Dogs Don't Like Kisses - Havanese Forum : Havanese Forums
 
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post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 11-12-2015, 09:00 AM Thread Starter
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Dogs Don't Like Kisses

thought this deserved a repeat Doggone Safe: Dogs Don't like Hugs and Kisses

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post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 11-12-2015, 10:10 AM Thread Starter
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AVSAB WARNS of THE DANGERS ONE CHILDREN’S BOOK POSES TO KIDS and THEIR PETS.

While kids are frequently seen to have a special bond with pets, children under the age of 10 are among those most commonly bitten by the dogs.

Many factors can contribute to dog bites in children, and one such factor is hugging and kissing by kids. Consequently, the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior (AVSAB) strongly advises that parents avoid purchasing the recently released children’s book Smooch Your Pooch for their kids. The book recommends that children “Smooch your pooch to show that you care. Give him a hug anytime, anywhere.” This information can cause children to be bitten.

Says one AVSAB member, Dr. Ilana Reisner, whose area of research is dog bites and children, “Although some dogs are not reactive about being kissed and hugged, these types of interactions are potentially provocative, leading to bites.”

In a study published by Reisner and her colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, records of bites to 111 children were examined. Says Reisner, “We looked at dogs that had bitten children and found that most children had been bitten by dogs that had no history of biting. Most important here,” says Reisner, “familiar children were bitten most often in the contexts of "nice" interactions—such as kissing and hugging —with their own dogs or dogs that they knew.”

The study also found that in addition to biting when they are hugged, kissed, bent over or sometimes simply petted, dogs are reactive when they are approached/touched while resting, when they have anything they consider "high value" (food, toys, a favorite blanket, or even the parent), and when they are hurt or frightened. These are the types of situations where children who have read Smooch Your Pooch may seek to interact with their dogs.

AVSAB recommends that children play with dogs in a more productive way such as by playing fetch or training tricks. We also recommend children avoid approaching or interacting with dogs who are lying down, resting or sleeping. Children, should instead interact with the dog only when the dog approaches willingly. Families with children are encouraged to train their dogs to come to them to be petted by have treats ready to reward the dog for approaching.
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The 3 Most Important Things to Teach Your Kids
Dogs Don’t Like Hugs and Kisses – Teach your kids not to hug or kiss a dog on the face. Hugging the family dog or face-to-face contact are common causes of bites to the face. Instead, teach kids to scratch the dog on the chest or the side of the neck.

Be a Tree if a Strange Dog Approaches – Teach kids to stand still, like a tree. Trees are boring and the dog will eventually go away. This works for strange dogs and anytime the family dog gets too frisky or becomes aggressive.

Never Tease a Dog – and never disturb a dog that’s sleeping, eating or protecting something . From Doggone Safe

Dave and Molly
Ian Dunbar was awarded the Outstanding Achievement Award from I.P.D.T.A. Here's a picture of me accepting the award on his behalf.
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post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 11-12-2015, 04:41 PM
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This is very good advice and definitely something to consider if you have young children. I often see little kids hugging pets (dogs, cats, whatever) a little too enthusiastically.
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post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 11-13-2015, 03:35 PM
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Unfortunately little ones often don't hug, they strangle. You see dogs struggling to get free and the children literally have a strangle hold on them. Parents need to teach interaction at a very young age. The parents too often think this is cute and it is absolutely not cute and it is teaching children bad habits in dog interaction.







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post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 11-14-2015, 12:59 PM
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I had a scary incident with my corgi, Foxy when we were camping. My husband and I were sitting outside reading and Foxy was asleep next to me in her bed. All of a sudden this little boy, probably around 3 or 4, is diving on top of peacefully sleeping Foxy. I did not see this kid coming and it startled both me, my husband and Foxy. Foxy had never shown aggression to any human, but I was surprised that she didn't at least growl, being so suddenly startled awake like that. She didn't though. Just looked up at me like she was saying "help". I kind of lectured the mom and little boy and told them that they were lucky Foxy was such a gentle soul. If it was some other dog, it could have ended badly.



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