Parvo /socialization - Havanese Forum : Havanese Forums
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post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 09-30-2016, 11:36 AM Thread Starter
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Parvo /socialization

can't overemphasize the importance of socialization. Unfortunately there are still many over cautious breeders and vets that want to isolate our pups. Far too many people getting their pups over 10 weeks of age in my opinion too. 12 weeks is all you have to work with for primary socialization. http://www.dogstardaily.com/blogs/dr...ine-parvovirus
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post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 09-30-2016, 12:59 PM
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The fear of Canine Parvovirus (CPV) over socialization is a crucial topic. Some breeds are particularly susceptible to contracting parvo, such as Alaskan Sled Dogs, Doberman Pinschers, German Shepherd Dogs, Labrador Retrievers, Rottweilers, and American Staffordshire Terriers; however, Havanese are NOT on the list.

When I was a kid, our Samoyed puppy contracted CPV. When she got sick we took her to the vet right away and she survived with no long-term effects. She contracted it at the breeder, who we later determined was a Back Yard Breeder, so was not reputable. This has been the case in similar situations with friends’ puppies that got sick; the origin of the virus (and/or parasites) was the breeder (BYB).

My recommendation is instead of worrying about the possibility of parvo after you bring a puppy home, an owner should spend more time selecting a good breeder that doesn’t breed multiple breeds, and especially the ones listed above. When you decide to get a puppy, you get excited and want one right away but that’s not the best approach. You MUST take your time and do your research on the breeder and the dam & sire. Doing that will greatly reduce a variety of health risks.

And as soon as you bring your puppy home you MUST sign it up for puppy classes right away, do not wait, and start socializing your puppy in the world daily.

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Last edited by MarinaGirl; 09-30-2016 at 01:36 PM.
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post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 09-30-2016, 02:19 PM Thread Starter
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Letter from R.K. Anderson to vets.

A Letter on Puppy Socialization from Dr. R.K. Anderson, DVM, Diplomat, American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine and Diplomat of American College of Veterinary Behaviorists
TO: My Colleagues in Veterinary Medicine:
Common questions I receive from puppy owners, dog trainers and veterinarians concern: 1) what is the most favorable age or period of time when puppies learn best? 2) what are the health implications of my advice that veterinarians and trainers should offer socialization programs for puppies starting at 8 to 9 weeks of age.
Puppies begin learning at birth and their brains appear to be particularly responsive to learning and retaining experiences that are encountered during the first 13 to 16 weeks after birth [Dr. Anderson is saying that the prime time for puppy socialization stops somewhere between 13 and 16 weeks, although more socialization occurs after that time]. This means that breeders, new puppy owners, veterinarians, trainers and behaviorists have a responsibility to assist in providing these learning/socialization experiences with other puppies/dogs, with children/adults and with various environmental situations during this optimal period from birth to 16 weeks.
Many veterinarians are making this early socialization and learning program part of a total wellness plan for breeders and new owners of puppies during the first 16 weeks of a puppy’s life -- the first 7-8 weeks with the breeder and the next 8 weeks with the new owners. This socialization program should enroll puppies from 8 to 12 weeks of age as a key part of any preventive medicine program to improve the bond between pets and their people and keep dogs as valued members of the family for 12 to 18 years.
To take full advantage of this early special learning period, many veterinarians recommend that new owners take their puppies to puppy socialization classes, beginning at 8 to 9 weeks of age. At this age they should have (and can be required to have) received a minimum of their first series of vaccines for protection against infectious diseases. This provides the basis for increasing immunity by further repeated exposure to these antigens either through natural exposure in small doses or artificial exposure with vaccines during the next 8 to 12 weeks. In addition the owner and people offering puppy socialization should take precautions to have the environment and the participating puppies as free of natural exposure as possible by good hygiene and caring by careful instructors and owners.
Experience and epidemiologic data support the relative safety and lack of transmission of disease in these puppy socialization classes over the past 10 years in many parts of the United States. In fact; the risk of a dog dying because of infection with distemper or parvo disease is far less than the much higher risk of a dog dying (euthanasia) because of a behavior problem. Many veterinarians are now offering new puppy owners puppy socialization classes in their hospitals or nearby training facilities in conjunction with
trainers and behaviorists because they want socialization and training to be very important parts of a wellness plan for every puppy. We need to recognize that this special sensitive period for learning is the best opportunity we have to influence behavior for dogs and the most important and longest lasting part of a total wellness plan.
Are there risks? Yes. But 10 years of good experience and data, with few exceptions, offers veterinarians the opportunity to generally recommend early socialization and training classes, beginning when puppies are 8 to 9 weeks of age. However, we always follow a veterinarian’s professional judgment, in individual cases or situations, where special circumstances warrant further immunization for a special puppy before starting such classes. During any period of delay for puppy classes, owners should begin a program of socialization with children and adults, outside their family, to take advantage of this special period in a puppy’s life.
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post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 09-30-2016, 04:07 PM
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I'd like to add another important reason to start puppy socialization at 8-9 weeks for our breed, and possibly even a bit younger for larger breeds. Large breed puppies that are likely to bowl our smaller breed puppies over with enthusiasm at 10-12 weeks are just too uncoordinated and lacking in development to be the physical danger to smaller pups at 8 weeks old. If, during those 2 weeks between 18-10 weeks, the larger breed puppies are exposed to littler breeds, by the time they COULD hurt them unintentionally, most have learned to "pull their punches" and play appropriately with small breeds.

I've seen with each of mine that very often the larger dogs they have been attracted to were dogs who were slow moving and very babyish at the beginning of the class. A couple of weeks later, when they are already friends, those large breed puppies roll over on their backs and welcome gentle play with the little guys. Not that you son't need to watch carefully, and be ready to intervene when there is a big mis-match in size, but it's amazing to see how well large and small breeds can play together when started REALLY young.
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post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 09-30-2016, 05:18 PM
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Just want to add that visitors both with and without dogs who come into your home, including even repairmen, are part of socialization. In other words, you can socialize them in other ways as well.
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post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 09-30-2016, 08:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoe093014 View Post
Just want to add that visitors both with and without dogs who come into your home, including even repairmen, are part of socialization. In other words, you can socialize them in other ways as well.
Of course, but even in a pretty busy household, the people and dogs that visit are not anywhere near enough to properly socialize a puppy. ...and puppy/puppy interactions are really more important than puppy meeting adult dog. Adult dogs often allow puppies to get away with murder, so the puppy doesn't learn good social skills that way.
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