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post #1 of 37 (permalink) Old 07-26-2019, 06:26 AM Thread Starter
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Using indoor electronic fencing to gate an area

Has anyone used indoor electronic fencing to keep your dog out of certain areas of the house? It is similar to outdoor invisible fencing. I am researching this because I have an open floor plan and the large open floor plan cannot be blocked off with a gate. I have new rugs and furnishings that I would like to protect. The area is blocked by placing a wire under the area rug. The wire, which is hidden, sends a signal that the puppy learns to avoid when wearing a special device on his collar. Training is provided by the company. Has anyone used this and was it successful? What was the result?
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post #2 of 37 (permalink) Old 07-26-2019, 09:55 AM
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Is there a reason why you canít use an ex pen of some kind to contain the puppy to a smaller area? I also have an open floor plan and itís way too much space for a puppy anyway, it will encourage roaming to pee everywhere and get into mischief.

I didnít open access to my whole downstairs until at least a year old and itís all hard floors and relatively kid friendly. I donít have furniture I need to protect at all and I still found an ex pen to be the best tool. I do have one wood gate that controls access to the upstairs, which is carpeted. I spent a lot of time retrofitting it to fit the doorway since itís in the entryway.
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post #3 of 37 (permalink) Old 07-26-2019, 07:55 PM Thread Starter
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I think by ex pen you mean a play pen? I thought that a play pen would be too confining to keep my dog in when I am home. I do plan to keep my dog in a gated area or play pen while I am out. But while home I do not want to restrict my dog's movement except from a few areas that have good rugs and furnishings. Isn't it true that even when a dog is house broken, accidents still happen? I do not mind an occasional accident if it can be easily cleaned up like on a tile floor. But for areas with rugs and a good sofa that cannot be gated off, I was thinking of using an electronic fence to deter my dog from wandering into the space. Has anyone used the electronic fence method in their home?? How has it worked out?
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post #4 of 37 (permalink) Old 07-26-2019, 11:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Nora View Post
I think by ex pen you mean a play pen? I thought that a play pen would be too confining to keep my dog in when I am home. I do plan to keep my dog in a gated area or play pen while I am out. But while home I do not want to restrict my dog's movement except from a few areas that have good rugs and furnishings. Isn't it true that even when a dog is house broken, accidents still happen? I do not mind an occasional accident if it can be easily cleaned up like on a tile floor. But for areas with rugs and a good sofa that cannot be gated off, I was thinking of using an electronic fence to deter my dog from wandering into the space. Has anyone used the electronic fence method in their home?? How has it worked out?
Can’t answer to the electric fence but I do know that for a puppy you DO want them confined to a small space like an exercise pen until they are older and pretty reliable for housebreaking except when you can directly supervise every move they make. And aside from that, puppies eat stuff they shouldn’t. So I don’t think simply being home is enough to let a young pup run around most of your home free. Even my 7 month old gets placed in his pen sometimes for nipping at people/ playing all wild w the kids at dinner time or even when I can’t watch him
And Legos are out. (Tiny pieces to choke on) I have no experience for the fence when perhaps your dog is older though
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post #5 of 37 (permalink) Old 07-27-2019, 06:08 AM Thread Starter
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I think by ex pen you mean a play pen? I thought that a play pen would be too confining to keep my dog in when I am home. I do plan to keep my dog in a gated area or play pen while I am out. But while home I do not want to restrict my dog's movement except from a few areas that have good rugs and furnishings. Isn't it true that even when a dog is house broken, accidents still happen? I do not mind an occasional accident if it can be easily cleaned up like on a tile floor. But for areas with rugs and a good sofa that cannot be gated off, I was thinking of using an electronic fence to deter my dog from wandering into the space. Has anyone used the electronic fence method in their home?? How has it worked out?
Can’t answer to the electric fence but I do know that for a puppy you DO want them confined to a small space like an exercise pen until they are older and pretty reliable for housebreaking except when you can directly supervise every move they make. And aside from that, puppies eat stuff they shouldn’t. So I don’t think simply being home is enough to let a young pup run around most of your home free. Even my 7 month old gets placed in his pen sometimes for nipping at people/ playing all wild w the kids at dinner time or even when I can’t watch him
And Legos are out. (Tiny pieces to choke on) I have no experience for the fence when perhaps your dog is older though
Just to clarify, I was referring to when my dog is older and house broken. Yes, I agree that a puppy should be in a pen most of the time. I am thinking ahead for what to do to protect rugs because I think there are still accidents even as an adult dog.
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post #6 of 37 (permalink) Old 07-27-2019, 08:20 AM
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Puppies and young dogs (for as long as it takes, that can be for their first year or even more, depending on the dog, the training they got before leaving the breeder and the effectiveness of the training from the new family) need to be confined to whatever space they can be successful in.

After that, can accidents happen? Well, of course. They can with human children and human adult too. But not often. Giving your dogs an indoor potty option (just as we have an indoor toilet to use as needed) goes a long way toward preventing "accidents" which are, more often than not, "accidents" of humans not letting the dog out when it really needs to go. And we don't put up electric shock wires to keep either humans or animals out of areas of the house. We don't use them outdoors either.

My dogs are 10, 4 and 3. I can't remember the last time there was an accident in my house. An adult dog who s "having accidents" unless they are ill, is not a house trained dog.

I do gate the dogs out of specific areas for a couple of reasons. They are gated out of the front entry, because otherwise they sit there in the windows and hurl insults at the turkey flock.They are gated out of the upstairs (where the bedrooms are) because the youngest believes she is "Goldilocks" and must "try every bed" (and un-make it in the process) if given unsupervised access. But I would never use an electric fence as a way of keeping her downstairs. I don't want her to be afraid to go upstairs other times. If I minded having a gate across the stairs, I'd ask people to keep bedroom doors closed. If they didn't, their problem if their bed got rumpled.

Oh, and they are gated IN my office whenever we are not home. That is our alternative to crating. They are happy and comfortable there, with a couch and their beds, water and a litter box. And more room to move around than they would in a crate. _WE_ know that in case of an emergency, they are in a contained space, where they are easy for someone to find and get them out of the house.
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post #7 of 37 (permalink) Old 07-27-2019, 09:06 AM Thread Starter
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My house is not very large, one level, and very difficult to section off. There is limited space for a play pen. The downstairs living room, dining room and kitchen are all one open room with furniture and rugs in most of it. I have a small den off of the entryway but it is too small for a play pen. As my puppy gets older, I do not think that while I am home, my dog will be happy in a small play pen while we are home. I think my young dog will want to move around the house to be near us. So how else can I make sure that my young dog does not wander onto my good rugs or jump onto my good sofa, and have an accidental potty event, or even be sick? I can't keep an eye on my dog 100% of the time while I am home. When I am out of the house, I always confine my dog and that is another matter entirely.
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post #8 of 37 (permalink) Old 07-27-2019, 12:51 PM
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I don't know much about electric fences, if the shock level is controllable etc. I try to be open minded, have even researched E- collars, but I just don't see this being a good idea. For example, if you are in a forbidden area and your puppy comes running to you. Does she associate the shock with entering the forbidden area or does she associate it with running to you? I would never want a pup to be punished for coming to me!

We also have an open floor plan single story home. The formal sitting/dining portion is furnished with very expensive oriental carpets and high end furniture. We have secured it from possible accidents with the "leave it" command. Whenever Skye would venture into that area he immediately would hear "Leave It !!" and was herded out of the area. Immediate praise as soon as he stepped over the invisible line into a "free" area. He never goes in there now, even if both of us are there.
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post #9 of 37 (permalink) Old 07-27-2019, 01:49 PM
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I am not a fan of electric fences or shocking devices, indoors or out.
My house is open concept, single story. I use a 12 wide play pen stretched out like a fence across the opening to 1/2 of the house and another across the other half so only the large kitchen & laundry is accessable. My boy stays in there while I am outside. If I leave for hours, he stays in his crate. When I am indoors, he stays with me while I go from room to room. He doesn't venture to other rooms but he could when I am home. He was 10 months and not housebroken when I got him. He has not had an accident since his first month.
My previous dogs always stayed in the kitchen/family room while I was there. They did not wander into the other rooms unless I went too.
I have never had a dog who had accidents after housetraining. A couple of times in my 18 year old's final days(kitchen) and following bladder surgery of my 10 year old. But those are not really accidents.
Take every opportunity to train your dog to stay with you in the house. These are very smart little dogs but very stubborn at times!
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post #10 of 37 (permalink) Old 07-27-2019, 02:50 PM
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Careful training and supervision can minimize the risk of a damaged rug or furniture, but will not eliminate the risk. I figure that the possibility of some puppy accidents (or, for that matter, an adult with an occasional upset stomach, or a senior dog accident) is something one willingly accepts as part of dog ownership. If that is not an acceptable risk, perhaps dog ownership should be thought through very carefully. And, Nora, please, please do not take offense at this comment. I myself had to do a lot of thinking things through before I decided I wanted a dog; I did not want to find out too late dog ownership wasnít right for me and have to re-home a dog.
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