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post #1 of 4 (permalink) Old 05-06-2011, 12:52 AM Thread Starter
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Our Babys heritage:)

I found this while I was trying to resurch Zoeys background It is a fun read.

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I am a member of the Independent Havanese Club and The Keeshond Club of America. I abide by each clubs code of ethics.
All dogs owned by Palmkees Keeshonden and Palmbrese Havanese that are to be bred have at least the following tests: OFA test for hips, CERF test for eyes, Michigan State full panel thyroid test, Baer (Havanese), heart and stifels tested by Vet. All tests must come back good or my dogs are not used for breeding.

A lot of Havanese can trace their origins to Cuba. Thanks to the efforts of Dorothy & Bert Goodale of Colorado, and their 11 foundation Havanese who kept the breed going. It is quite possible the Havanese breed would no longer exist as their numbers had diminished to a small number, world wide by the late 1960's.

Dorothy & Bert Goodale were looking for a toy dog to breed. They began hearing stories that referred to the silky white dogs that had accompanied a few families exiled from Cuba during the revolution of the 1950's and 1960's. Years of investigation had led nowhere, then they came upon an ad in a Florida paper. Through this ad they were able to acquire six pedigreed Havanese from the Perez & Fantasio families. These included an adult female, and a litter of four female pups sired by Silver Tiger and out of Rags Girl named Show Girl, Inky Doll, Dark Lady, & Buttons 'n Bows. Also in this purchase was a male named Silver Promise, a Rags Girl grandson.

They began placing ads in Latin papers, throughout the Miami area, offering to purchase more of the these Cuban dogs. A Florida man contacted them, telling of a friend of his that had five Havanese he wished to sell. Ezekiel Barba had fled from Cuba to Costa Rica at the time of the revolution. Now elderly, and in failing health, he had decided to move to Texas to live with his daughter and could no longer care for his Havanese. The Goodales were able to purchase his five dogs, four females, and one male. They included: Nieve & Querido, littermates. Dulce & Sorpresa who were also littermates and shared a sire with Nieve and Querido, and finally another male, Jefe Pequeno. The Goodales bred Jefe Pequeno with Nieve, to produce one of their favorite and most consistant sires, Tigre Luna.

Both groups of dogs were similar in appearance and temperament. With their foundation stock in place, the Goodales began breeding the dogs using the existing 1963 FCI Breed Standard as a reference. In 1974 their first litter was whelped...and with it the rebirth of the Havanese breed.

In 1979, just five years after that first litter arrived, the Havanese Club of America was founded. The handful of breeders and Havanese sponsors at that time also established the HCA breed registry. Through their efforts, the breed continued to grow in size.

In 1991, the Havanese breed was recognized by the UKC and also in that same year The Bichon Habanero Club discovered 15 purebred Havanese in Cuba and designated them as foundation stock for the rebirth of the Havanese breed in Cuba.

In February 1996, the breed received Miscellaneous Class status under the AKC.

On January 1, 1999 the Havanese breed became a member of the AKC's Toy Group.

In 2001, the Canadian Kennel Club recognized the Havanese breed.

It is now believed that nearly all Havanese in the world, other than those in Cuba itself, can be traced back to the Goodale's eleven dogs.


History of the Havanese

The Havanese is the National dog of Cuba and the only breed native to the island. The Cuban love of the charming little Bichon Havanese is evident in their use of his likeness on a 1992 souvenir issue postage stamp.

Sadly, the actual origin of the Havanese breed is foggy at best. Century's of conjecture and mystery have blurred the specifics and left much of the early development of the little breed to a patchwork of fact and fiction.

Most historians seem to agree the roots of today's Havanese dog appear to have originated in the western Mediterranean area. Early ship's logs from the sixteenth century speak of dogs that traveled with the families of Spanish aristocracy to Cuba. At that time the Bichon breeds were quite popular in Europe as lapdogs. The enchanting little dogs were quite small and easily carried. They were quick to learn, adept at performing tricks and games, and were all around charmers. They became a favorite lapdog of the Cuban Aristocracy, making their homes on the vast sugar plantations owned by these wealthy patrons of the breed. Litters were never offered for commercial sale. Instead they were planned for the express purpose of sharing with intimate friends and family members. The little dogs were rarely seen outdoors, other than with their mistresses during promenades.

So desired were the dogs, that stories abound of ships captains offering them as gifts to the affluent wives of Cuban businessmen in the hopes of garnering business for the sea merchants. These dogs most likely came from Tenerife, one of the few ports open to Cuba for trade at the time, which would have made the dogs accessible to the ships passing through. The Dog of Tenerife was able to develop with out much outside influence, becoming the common ancestor to all Bichon breeds.

Once on the Island of Cuba, the dogs seemed to acclimatize to the tropical island extremely well. They became quite heat-tolerant. They developed profuse silky coats, which protected them from the sun and heat, much as a sari protects the women of India. The coat's silk floss texture became one of its distinctive features. The coats were never clipped so as to allow the light airy layers to protect the dog from the tropical rays, and the hair was allowed to fall forward over the dog's eyes to protect them from the intense sunlight.

Even as the "Bichon Havanese" emerged as a favorite of Cuban Aristocracy, they also found their way to Europe. European Aristocracy vacationing in Havana became quite enchanted by the dogs, returning home with them at the end of their holidays.

The Havanese proceeded to find favor in the courts of Spain, France, and England. By the mid-eighteenth century, the little dog of Havana was quite trendy. Queen Victoria owned two and Charles Dickens owned one. During the dog's brief appearance in Europe, they could be found enchanting audiences both at dog shows, and performing in circus acts. Unfortunately, none are known to have survived the turbulence of the century in Europe.

Near the start of the twentieth century in Cuba, slavery was being replaced by mechanized equipment. The aristocratic families who had closely guarded the ownership of the dogs were disappearing, no longer able to maintain their vast sugar plantations without the cheap labor they were accustomed to. With the absence of their wealthy patrons, the Bichon Havanese were now free to win the hearts of the general public, ingratiating themselves into Cuban family life, and becoming the preferred dog of the common people.

Many wealthy Cubans migrated from the island of Cuba after the Socialist Revolution of the 1960's. By that time, the Havanese had virtually disappeared throughout the world, and the little dogs were on the verge of extinction. Three families are known to have smuggled their Bichon Havanese aboard ships with them. The Perez and Fantasio families immigrated to Florida, while Ezekial Barba went to Costa Rica. Once settled, these three families worked together to preserve the breed by combining their gene pools.

In the early 1970's, Dorothy and Bert Goodale in Colorado were able to acquire 11 dogs from the three families. All the Havanese in the world today, except for possibly some in "Iron Curtain" countries, and those remaining in Cuba, stem from the 11 dogs the Goodale's acquired from the Perez, Fantasio, and Barba lines.

In 1991, 15 purebred havanese were found in Cuba and a carefully supervised breeding program was put into place, using them as foundation stock with the Cuban Bichon Habanero Club overseeing their resurgence.


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post #2 of 4 (permalink) Old 05-06-2011, 09:34 AM
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It's always good to continue the research into our lovely breed. Dorothy Goodale's book and Zoila Portuando's books are wonderful resources for Havanese history.

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post #3 of 4 (permalink) Old 05-06-2011, 11:10 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pattie View Post
It's always good to continue the research into our lovely breed. Dorothy Goodale's book and Zoila Portuando's books are wonderful resources for Havanese history.
Thanks Pattie, I would like very much to get those books.
Also I have been looking up Zoeys bloodline and one of your Havanese has Ch Los Perritos Luigi Rom and so does Zoey! Our kids are related! I have to go back about 4 generations to find it. I bet our forum has a bunch of relatives!
Maybe it was not 4 generations I cant remember now I think It is from A Flaming Geyser one of Zoeys grandparents I lost track.

Maddie at 5mo old

Last edited by Suzi; 05-06-2011 at 11:21 AM.
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post #4 of 4 (permalink) Old 05-06-2011, 01:00 PM
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Yes, US Havanese having come from 11 dogs here in the US can trace their bloodlines back to those 11 dogs. If you want to see the first dogs in Zoey's pedigree got to Havanese Gallery, look up one of her earliest ancestors and go backward from there. It's fun.

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