Older Dog problem - Havanese Forum : Havanese Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-07-2012, 11:51 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
nancyf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Little Elm
Posts: 403
Submit Photo: 0
Photo Submissions 3 Times in 3 Posts
Older Dog problem

Dani is 11 and has been healthy. We got their yearly check up a couple days ago and the blood tests showed some elevated liver levels.

She's been tired and is drinking more, but she's 11 and I thought the heat was causing her to be more thirsty.

Our vet put her on antibiotics to cover any infection that may be causing the liver problem. And then put her on a liver vitamin to strengthen it.

I did some searches on elderly dogs and liver problems. I realize this can be serious but the vet said that the levels were high but not in the thousands like serious conditions will show.

She didn't act like I thought she would if she was sick. She loves to eat and jumps around so much I have to try and keep her still. She wags her tail and is happy. She doesn't like to go on a walk, but in the three and a half years we've had her, she never did love a walk.

I'm doing more research on older dogs and what to watch for and what to expect to be able to help Dani as much as I can.
nancyf is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-07-2012, 02:02 PM
Sena
 
El Bueno Habanero's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 372
Submit Photo: 2
Photo Submissions 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hi Nancy, I don't know anything about liver problems in dogs, but I just wanted to tell you I'll keep you and your sweet Dani in my prayers, hoping that it is nothing serious. Give Dani a big hug :-).

El Bueno Habanero is offline  
post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-07-2012, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
nancyf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Little Elm
Posts: 403
Submit Photo: 0
Photo Submissions 3 Times in 3 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Bueno Habanero View Post
Hi Nancy, I don't know anything about liver problems in dogs, but I just wanted to tell you I'll keep you and your sweet Dani in my prayers, hoping that it is nothing serious. Give Dani a big hug :-).
Thank you for your kindness! We spent three weeks in The Netherlands several years ago and thought it was a lovely country--especially since our visit was in Spring when the tulip fields looked like a patch quilt. Absolutely lovely country. Thank you again.
nancyf is offline  
 
post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-07-2012, 05:18 PM
Dave T
 
davetgabby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 10,729
Submit Photo: 3
Photo Submissions 112 Times in 110 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by nancyf View Post
Dani is 11 and has been healthy. We got their yearly check up a couple days ago and the blood tests showed some elevated liver levels.

She's been tired and is drinking more, but she's 11 and I thought the heat was causing her to be more thirsty.

Our vet put her on antibiotics to cover any infection that may be causing the liver problem. And then put her on a liver vitamin to strengthen it.

I did some searches on elderly dogs and liver problems. I realize this can be serious but the vet said that the levels were high but not in the thousands like serious conditions will show.

She didn't act like I thought she would if she was sick. She loves to eat and jumps around so much I have to try and keep her still. She wags her tail and is happy. She doesn't like to go on a walk, but in the three and a half years we've had her, she never did love a walk.

I'm doing more research on older dogs and what to watch for and what to expect to be able to help Dani as much as I can.
Careful what you read Nancy. What are you feeding?

Dave and Molly
Ian Dunbar was awarded the Outstanding Achievement Award from I.P.D.T.A. Here's a picture of me accepting the award on his behalf.
Member of IAABC ,International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants , Member of Pet Professional Guild
davetgabby is offline  
post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-08-2012, 08:48 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
nancyf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Little Elm
Posts: 403
Submit Photo: 0
Photo Submissions 3 Times in 3 Posts
Dani was on Wellness Simple Salmon canned but we couldn't find it easily so a few weeks ago I did a gradual switch to Natural Balance LID fish/sweet potato.
nancyf is offline  
post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-08-2012, 10:21 AM
Connie Field
 
harborhavanese's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 10
Submit Photo: 0
Photo Submissions 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hello Nancy!

The fact that Dani is eleven years old and this has recently surfaced can be viewed as positive. I would begin thinking about Dani's environment. Could he have come in contact with grass treated with pesticides along his daily walks? Have you recently treated any areas he comes in contact? Take a really close look at everything in his environment. Also, a vitamin deficiency maybe something to explore. Vitamin E or K, and there are several others. This would correlate with his age as some of the weight management foods are deficient for these vitamins.

Just some things to think about.

Best to Dani and you!

Please keep us posted and hugs to all!

Connie

Harbor Havanese

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act, but a habit.”

-Aristotle
harborhavanese is offline  
post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-08-2012, 12:05 PM
Dave T
 
davetgabby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 10,729
Submit Photo: 3
Photo Submissions 112 Times in 110 Posts
good points Connie. This always a guessing game. At least you are feeding canned. If the vet doesn't identify the cause and only works on symtoms, that is frustrating. Here is a quote from Sabine on the importance of water in our animals food.
"Dogs who eat mostly canned food or a home prepared diet automatically take in more moisture
than dogs eating kibble, so they do not need to compensate as much by drinking. Contrary to
what many people think and pet food companies claim, dogs (and cats even moreso) do not
instinctively know how much extra water they have to drink to make up for what is lacking in dry
food.
A greater incidence of bladder diseases and stones/crystals in pets since dry food has become
the prevalent method of feeding is one result. An increasing number of American Veterinary
Medical Association members, including board-certified veterinary nutritionists, are now strongly
recommending the feeding of canned food instead of dry kibble to cats, but the issue is sadly still
widely ignored in dogs."

I'll give her a dingle and see if she might recommend something.

Dave and Molly
Ian Dunbar was awarded the Outstanding Achievement Award from I.P.D.T.A. Here's a picture of me accepting the award on his behalf.
Member of IAABC ,International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants , Member of Pet Professional Guild

Last edited by davetgabby; 09-08-2012 at 12:07 PM.
davetgabby is offline  
post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-08-2012, 12:21 PM
Connie Field
 
harborhavanese's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 10
Submit Photo: 0
Photo Submissions 0 Times in 0 Posts
I love the information on water and feeding. A few more thoughts...canned food is considerably lower in protein. When we look at appropriate levels of protein it is based on a dry matter basis. When you remove all the water, you have too little protein in most canned foods. Some times this can work for you depending on what issues you are trying to address. For example, Luna, a Havanese I bred and loved infinitely with severe liver anomalies (Nancy, please don't let Luna scare you. Luna was a rare situation and I am so pleased if it had to happen, it happened to me. She was only on this Earth for less than three years and I wouldn't trade one of those days for anything) I digress. She was placed on a special diet for Hepatic issues. We tried them all. She wouldn't eat them. For better or for worse, it doesn't do much good if the dog won't eat it. My specialist finally recommended feeding a good quality canned diet because canned food is lower in protein. Of course, there is much more to it and it wasn't optimal, but at least she was eating a lower protein diet.
I do agree adding water to the diet is important. There is a lot of information on the subject. It's better for kidneys as well if you have a breed prone to bloat (greyhounds) it's also a great idea. I add a few tablespoons of canned food to my kibble and then add warm water as well supplements. Just another take on a great idea.

Warm regards.

Again, this forum is awesome. It is so great to commune and pass along information! Thanks for the opportunity Havanese Forum

Connie

Harbor Havanese

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act, but a habit.”

-Aristotle
harborhavanese is offline  
post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-08-2012, 12:39 PM
Dave T
 
davetgabby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 10,729
Submit Photo: 3
Photo Submissions 112 Times in 110 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by harborhavanese View Post
I love the information on water and feeding. A few more thoughts...canned food is considerably lower in protein. When we look at appropriate levels of protein it is based on a dry matter basis. When you remove all the water, you have too little protein in most canned foods. Some times this can work for you depending on what issues you are trying to address. For example, Luna, a Havanese I bred and loved infinitely with severe liver anomalies (Nancy, please don't let Luna scare you. Luna was a rare situation and I am so pleased if it had to happen, it happened to me. She was only on this Earth for less than three years and I wouldn't trade one of those days for anything) I digress. She was placed on a special diet for Hepatic issues. We tried them all. She wouldn't eat them. For better or for worse, it doesn't do much good if the dog won't eat it. My specialist finally recommended feeding a good quality canned diet because canned food is lower in protein. Of course, there is much more to it and it wasn't optimal, but at least she was eating a lower protein diet.
I do agree adding water to the diet is important. There is a lot of information on the subject. It's better for kidneys as well if you have a breed prone to bloat (greyhounds) it's also a great idea. I add a few tablespoons of canned food to my kibble and then add warm water as well supplements. Just another take on a great idea.

Warm regards.

Again, this forum is awesome. It is so great to commune and pass along information! Thanks for the opportunity Havanese Forum
I have to disagree with your statement that canned has less protein. I posted a two part article on this a while ago. Besides ,generally speaking if a dog is healthy with no issues. ,there's no such thing as too much protein. Here's part one of the two part article.
http://www.havaneseforum.com/showthr...ghlight=versus
here's part two if you're interested http://www.havaneseforum.com/showthr...ghlight=versus

Dave and Molly
Ian Dunbar was awarded the Outstanding Achievement Award from I.P.D.T.A. Here's a picture of me accepting the award on his behalf.
Member of IAABC ,International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants , Member of Pet Professional Guild

Last edited by davetgabby; 09-08-2012 at 12:52 PM.
davetgabby is offline  
post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 09-08-2012, 01:08 PM
Dave T
 
davetgabby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 10,729
Submit Photo: 3
Photo Submissions 112 Times in 110 Posts
here is another quote from Sabine on this topic...
"There is no such thing as "too much protein".
http://www.dogfoodproject.com/index....e=protein_myth
Case in point, the NRC publication gives a "safe upper limit" for things like fat, vitamin A, vitamin D and some other nutrients, but there is none listed for protein. Dogs are carnivorous animals with dentition and a digestive tract that are best suited for eating meat, fat and bone. Carbohydrates can be digested, but only if they are fed in a usable form - which means with their plant cell walls broken down already. Hand a dog a sheaf of grain or a sack of raw potatoes and he couldn't get much nutrition out of that. Cook them and they become digestible. What are examples when a dog should not have too much protein. ? There are very few actually.

One thing that comes to mind immediately is a dog where kidney failure has progressed to the point where the dog is actually uremic, generally meaning lab work shows BUN over 80 mg/dl and creatinine over 4.0 mg/dl. This is where it actually makes sense to restrict protein to reduce the work load of the kidneys. I have attached a file that you might find of interest in regards to protein and kidney disease - mainly because most vets still follow long outdated information.

The other is chronic pancreatitis, because it's not only the fat content of the diet that stimulates the pancreas, protein also does."

Dave and Molly
Ian Dunbar was awarded the Outstanding Achievement Award from I.P.D.T.A. Here's a picture of me accepting the award on his behalf.
Member of IAABC ,International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants , Member of Pet Professional Guild
davetgabby is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Havanese Forum : Havanese Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome