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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I want to ask, how do you all groom your dogs' bellies, especially for those dogs that do not feel comfortable laying on their back or side for grooming?

Enzo and I have been working very hard on cooperative care with his brush. I am at the same time learning how to care for a drop coat. It's been hard balancing the need to groom his fur vs. going at a pace where he is tolerating the groom. We've gotten to a decent point now where I can brush a lot of his fur to the skin around his sides, I work a little slower with his face and paws and rump since those are his more sensitive areas. He lays on his tummy since I am still not able to get him to comfortably lay on his side, though I'd like to get him there one day. In any case, his tummy is out of reach when I groom him like this, so often I have to hold him up to get it since he's never been comfortable laying on his back for a groom. Is there a better position to hold them so you can see what you are doing while you are doing it? I can't help but think I'm not getting to all of his fur this way, and that I'm making him super uncomfortable :/

I've been told a few times that I shouldn't let him "get away" with refusing a groom or struggling, but I'm conflicted a bit because I value things like cooperative care so much, and I don't ever want Enzo to feel scared or helpless during a groom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a grooming table where I groom my dogs. This has been one of the best purchases I have ever made. There are certain tasks like paw pad trimming that I feel are impossible without a grooming table.
Did you have to desensitize your pups to the grooming noose? I want a full size grooming table for myself, I know it will be an important investment for us.
 

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Did you have to desensitize your pups to the grooming noose? I want a full size grooming table for myself, I know it will be an important investment for us.
My dogs are 14 so I have had it a long time. I don’t recall any particular desensitization being needed for the loop. However, Mia absolutely hated grooming and I hate to desensitize her for everything! All it took was some treats which she still gets every time she goes on the table. In fact she actually runs to the table to be groomed as long as she knows treats are waiting for her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My dogs are 14 so I have had it a long time. I don’t recall any particular desensitization being needed for the loop. However, Mia absolutely hated grooming and I hate to desensitize her for everything! All it took was some treats which she still gets every time she goes on the table. In fact she actually runs to the table to be groomed as long as she knows treats are waiting for her.
That's good to hear. Enzo gets excited for grooming too since he knows he gets treats! He doesn't like the brushing, but he knows he has good stuff coming, which I think really helps him to relax. Giving him directions helps too, he has to think about what he should be doing in order to get rewarded. I let him leave and choose to come back when he gets a little overwhelmed, and he always comes back when I give him a few seconds to think about it. I'm hoping he's ok with the noose, since it will give me the opportunity to have both hands free for the more difficult groom areas.
 

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With any puppy that you even THINK you might want to show, you NEED to have a grooming table, or at least a grooming “station” on the counter or somewhere of a reasonable height and nice and sturdy. Put a memory foam bath mat on it. Attach a grooming arm. Feed him EVERY meal there. That is the beginning of your desensitization. In the beginning, just let him stand there and eat his meal while you gently stroke him with a brush. Then start hand feeding him with his head in the grooming loop. (I HATE the word “noose”!) Now you have a dog who is happy to be up on the table and will stand in the grooming loop and you can GENTLY work on his belly! ;)

I do NOT pull on mats on the belly. A judge can’t see under there anyway. I gently cut them out with my peanut trimmers as long as they cannot be seen, ESPECIALLY on a young puppy.

AT THE SAME TIME, you really NEED to be working SEPARATELY on getting him to lie on both sides. Do NOT do this in the context of grooming yet. You may need to use some (gentle) force to get him down in the beginning, then treat, treat treat and let him right up. Then do it again later in the day. And the next day. And the next. If you are going to keep an adult dog in a full show coat, you are GOING to need to get at his underside and groom him. Lots of dogs feel very vulnerable on their backs. Most of them are relatively comfortable lying on their sides and will eventually accept lying on both sides and letting you access their belly on a grooming table so that you can gently groom them. But the position has to be trained first, without trying to groom them at the same time.

And both need to be done on a grooming surface of an appropriate height. I now use a grooming table, and have for years. But when I only had Kodi, I groomed him on top of our washing mashine, and that worked quite well for several years
Dog Carnivore Dog breed Companion dog Dog supply


This is my grooming set-up now:
Window Wood Flooring Floor Luggage and bags
 

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That's good to hear. Enzo gets excited for grooming too since he knows he gets treats! He doesn't like the brushing, but he knows he has good stuff coming, which I think really helps him to relax. Giving him directions helps too, he has to think about what he should be doing in order to get rewarded. I let him leave and choose to come back when he gets a little overwhelmed, and he always comes back when I give him a few seconds to think about it. I'm hoping he's ok with the noose, since it will give me the opportunity to have both hands free for the more difficult groom areas.
I think he will be fine with the noose. The noose will make YOU more comfortable and if you are more at ease, he will be too! It may help to do a bit of grooming at a time vs. a long dragged out session. I try to avoid long grooming sessions myself.
 

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That's good to hear. Enzo gets excited for grooming too since he knows he gets treats! He doesn't like the brushing, but he knows he has good stuff coming, which I think really helps him to relax. Giving him directions helps too, he has to think about what he should be doing in order to get rewarded. I let him leave and choose to come back when he gets a little overwhelmed, and he always comes back when I give him a few seconds to think about it. I'm hoping he's ok with the noose, since it will give me the opportunity to have both hands free for the more difficult groom areas.
I am a big believer in cooperative care when possible. But I also believe that with both animals and children that you do them no favors giving them a “choice” to leave when something HAS to be done that is unpleasant. You have not reached that point yet with Enzo, but you will. When he starts to blow coat, youjust can’t let him leave when he is matted and opts out. It is your responsibility to de-mat him. As gently as possible, but prolonging the agony is not going to make it easier for either of you. Being a Havanese in full coat means needing to learn to stay still and quiet while mats are worked out. The sooner he learns that, the less uncomfortable his life will be. This is a place where a little “tough love” is really a kindness.

Otherwise, you will end up needing to have him cut him down. THAT’S not the end of the world either of course. But I guarantee you, that the groomer is not going to let him opt out. She will hold him still and get the job done. ;)
 

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This is interesting. I have managed to groom Mia without ever having her lie on her sides, even when her hair was long! However, I have had to become a bit of a contortionist at times.
You have not had a boy peeing on his belly hair. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you Karen! I needed to hear that. I know this is a learning process for both Enzo and I. Thankfully his fur hasn't grown too long that it's unmanageable. I am learning to use tough love when I have to. I am a bit of a softie but I know it's not worth it if it ends in my dog getting covered in matts.

Is there a thread here or some sort of video/article I could read on which types of brushes to use when? I invested in the CC buttercomb and I think it works very nicely for matts and generally when brushing to the skin. My next brush is probably the oblong wood pin brush since it is so heavily recommend here. I have a feet/face comb that is a generic brand that I use sometimes. I'd love to get a chance to see a video or read through someone's process so I know I'm doing it right and using the right tools at the right time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
With any puppy that you even THINK you might want to show, you NEED to have a grooming table, or at least a grooming “station” on the counter or somewhere of a reasonable height and nice and sturdy. Put a memory foam bath mat on it. Attach a grooming arm. Feed him EVERY meal there. That is the beginning of your desensitization. In the beginning, just let him stand there and eat his meal while you gently stroke him with a brush. Then start hand feeding him with his head in the grooming loop. (I HATE the word “noose”!) Now you have a dog who is happy to be up on the table and will stand in the grooming loop and you can GENTLY work on his belly! ;)

I do NOT pull on mats on the belly. A judge can’t see under there anyway. I gently cut them out with my peanut trimmers as long as they cannot be seen, ESPECIALLY on a young puppy.

AT THE SAME TIME, you really NEED to be working SEPARATELY on getting him to lie on both sides. Do NOT do this in the context of grooming yet. You may need to use some (gentle) force to get him down in the beginning, then treat, treat treat and let him right up. Then do it again later in the day. And the next day. And the next. If you are going to keep an adult dog in a full show coat, you are GOING to need to get at his underside and groom him. Lots of dogs feel very vulnerable on their backs. Most of them are relatively comfortable lying on their sides and will eventually accept lying on both sides and letting you access their belly on a grooming table so that you can gently groom them. But the position has to be trained first, without trying to groom them at the same time.

And both need to be done on a grooming surface of an appropriate height. I now use a grooming table, and have for years. But when I only had Kodi, I groomed him on top of our washing mashine, and that worked quite well for several years View attachment 179477

This is my grooming set-up now:
View attachment 179478
The word loop is so much better! It just wasn't coming to me, lol. Enzo thankfully is very comfortable on tall surfaces. I don't think he will mind being up on a table or on the machine, but I will make sure to desensitize him anyway.
 

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Thank you Karen! I needed to hear that. I know this is a learning process for both Enzo and I. Thankfully his fur hasn't grown too long that it's unmanageable. I am learning to use tough love when I have to. I am a bit of a softie but I know it's not worth it if it ends in my dog getting covered in matts.

Is there a thread here or some sort of video/article I could read on which types of brushes to use when? I invested in the CC buttercomb and I think it works very nicely for matts and generally when brushing to the skin. My next brush is probably the oblong wood pin brush since it is so heavily recommend here. I have a feet/face comb that is a generic brand that I use sometimes. I'd love to get a chance to see a video or read through someone's process so I know I'm doing it right and using the right tools at the right time.
I would skip the wood pin brush for now if you plan to keep him in full coat. IMO, it is only useful for fluffing when you are drying him. Spend your money on a CC Ice Slip brush instead. This will do everything the wood pin brush will, it is more durable, and it will move through a full coat better. It doesn’t look like Enzo has much under coat yet, and a wood pin brush won’t even START to go through any undercoat.

For a slicker type brush, I do NOT like the CC brushes, so save some money there! The ones I like best are WICKED expensive and imported, (Le Pooche) so skip those. ALMOST as good is the Artero double sided slicker: https://smile.amazon.com/Artero-Small-Double-Sided-Slicker/dp/B06XPPM7B8/ref=sr_1_2?crid=3M5657R7E8H0F&keywords=artero+grooming+products&qid=1668738576&sprefix=Artero,aps,86&sr=8-2&th=1

Or if you want an even cheaper one, this one is not at all bad either: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B07B267...t-supplies&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9kZXRhaWw

In terms of what tool to use when, I think it is a matter of learning your own dog’s coat to some extent. I don’t always use the same tools on each dog. Their coats are all different. My go-to tool is ALWAYS a Buttercomb or Greyhound comb (they are more expensive) but when Kodi was in full coat and for Panda, I usually used the finer end.

For Ducky, his coat is SO dense, that I couldn’t possibly get the fine end through his coat until he is COMPLETELY combed out with with wide end. I’m guessing that you would use almost exclusively the fine end on Enzo, unless you hit a mat.

For Ducky, I start with him standing on the table in the grooming loop, and comb him all over, using Ice on Ice, starting on his shoulders, and chest and working back. First one side, then the other. I feel underneath for any “trouble spots”. If there is just something tiny that I can get with him standing “by feel”, I do it. If not, I get him out of the loop, lay him down and deal with it. FORTUNATELY, this happens less if I keep him really clean, and also as he matures. He is now 19 months old, and I have been REALLY lucky that he has never blown coat heavily. When he DOES have matting that needs to be addressed under there, I take him out of the loop and lay him down. I really douse the mats with Ice on Ice and VERY carefully tease them apart. (also, any mats in his groin or around his sheath I just remove with my Wahl Peanut trimmer. This counts as “sanitary area, and is FINE for you to clean up with trimming! Don’t hurt your dog de-matting these areas or in the arm pits!) I am SUPER careful not to pull on him him so he has no reason not to trust me when he is lying down! Cookies the MOMENT I’m done with that!!! After I comb him through, I use the slicker to fluff his feet, then the face comb on his mustache and beard. (Fine end of THAT in the corner of his eyes) Then I take his head out of the loop and ask him to put his head down on the table for me to do his head and neck. I comb his head, neck, and ears with the regular comb, then go back to the face comb to part his pony and put it up. AND… he’s done!

BTW, how are you trimming his nails and feet at this point if you aren’t using a grooming loop? I can’t imagine doing that with the dog loose. I actually do groom Panda loose for most things, but even she, as good as she is, is in the grooming loop for feet and nails!
 

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For getting him to le on his side or back, how does he feel on your lap? When I need Perry on his back I sit on the floor with my legs or in front of me and I gently put him on his back cradled on my legs, treating if needed. He's a lot more comfortable in my lap like they then he would be if I tried to por him on his back on a table. You could try it on your lap first and then transition to the grooming table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I would skip the wood pin brush for now if you plan to keep him in full coat. IMO, it is only useful for fluffing when you are drying him. Spend your money on a CC Ice Slip brush instead. This will do everything the wood pin brush will, it is more durable, and it will move through a full coat better. It doesn’t look like Enzo has much under coat yet, and a wood pin brush won’t even START to go through any undercoat.

For a slicker type brush, I do NOT like the CC brushes, so save some money there! The ones I like best are WICKED expensive and imported, (Le Pooche) so skip those. ALMOST as good is the Artero double sided slicker: https://smile.amazon.com/Artero-Small-Double-Sided-Slicker/dp/B06XPPM7B8/ref=sr_1_2?crid=3M5657R7E8H0F&keywords=artero+grooming+products&qid=1668738576&sprefix=Artero,aps,86&sr=8-2&th=1

Or if you want an even cheaper one, this one is not at all bad either: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B07B267...t-supplies&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9kZXRhaWw

In terms of what tool to use when, I think it is a matter of learning your own dog’s coat to some extent. I don’t always use the same tools on each dog. Their coats are all different. My go-to tool is ALWAYS a Buttercomb or Greyhound comb (they are more expensive) but when Kodi was in full coat and for Panda, I usually used the finer end.

For Ducky, his coat is SO dense, that I couldn’t possibly get the fine end through his coat until he is COMPLETELY combed out with with wide end. I’m guessing that you would use almost exclusively the fine end on Enzo, unless you hit a mat.

For Ducky, I start with him standing on the table in the grooming loop, and comb him all over, using Ice on Ice, starting on his shoulders, and chest and working back. First one side, then the other. I feel underneath for any “trouble spots”. If there is just something tiny that I can get with him standing “by feel”, I do it. If not, I get him out of the loop, lay him down and deal with it. FORTUNATELY, this happens less if I keep him really clean, and also as he matures. He is now 19 months old, and I have been REALLY lucky that he has never blown coat heavily. When he DOES have matting that needs to be addressed under there, I take him out of the loop and lay him down. I really douse the mats with Ice on Ice and VERY carefully tease them apart. (also, any mats in his groin or around his sheath I just remove with my Wahl Peanut trimmer. This counts as “sanitary area, and is FINE for you to clean up with trimming! Don’t hurt your dog de-matting these areas or in the arm pits!) I am SUPER careful not to pull on him him so he has no reason not to trust me when he is lying down! Cookies the MOMENT I’m done with that!!! After I comb him through, I use the slicker to fluff his feet, then the face comb on his mustache and beard. (Fine end of THAT in the corner of his eyes) Then I take his head out of the loop and ask him to put his head down on the table for me to do his head and neck. I comb his head, neck, and ears with the regular comb, then go back to the face comb to part his pony and put it up. AND… he’s done!

BTW, how are you trimming his nails and feet at this point if you aren’t using a grooming loop? I can’t imagine doing that with the dog loose. I actually do groom Panda loose for most things, but even she, as good as she is, is in the grooming loop for feet and nails!
Thank you for all of this! I am probably going to read through it a few times again to make sure I absorbed everything lol. I do need to order some Ice on Ice, do you use the detangler/finisher or dematting spray? I am using some puppy fur detangler I picked up at the store and I'm not a huge fan.

Also yes, Enzo is only 7 months and hasn't developed his undercoat or blown coat yet. I'm not looking forward to it. Hoping it won't be so bad that I have to shave him, but hair grows. It won't be the end of the world.

His groin definitely gets messier since he licks it after he pees (nice, right) so I'm wondering how one would use the peanut trimmer to clean up the area without trimming too much. I will likely order one since right now I just have some grooming sheers, and they aren't really great for matts.

As for his nails - I honestly usually have a helper either hold him or give him treats while I trim. He does better when he's hovering above the ground for a trim.

I didn't think this was super sustainable since I don't always have a helper, so I've been practicing every night with him and trimming 2 nails at a time very slowly and with care, and hopefully will work up to trimming more as he gets more comfortable with it. The grooming table will definitely help. His nails are not as short as they should be, I admit, but they are not nearly as long as most other pet dog nails I've seen 😅 I want to get them shorter over time, which I know is possible with a bit of diligence. I may also have to see if I can get a groomer to help out.

I admit I've made a lot of mistakes with him since he's my first puppy and my first experience with a drop coated dog. I really want to keep trying my best with him even if it means we have some hiccups along the way. I guess my biggest concern is turning him into a dog that tries to bite groomers, which might be silly since he has such a sweet and placid demeanor.

Although, I felt like tonight's grooming session went well. He squirmed just a little at first but relaxed after I encouraged him and went slow. He did have some matts in his armpits, where he usually gets them. If i knew it was ok to trim them out I probably would have done that but he did ok when I combed them out. He seemed to be somewhat more comfortable on my lap. If he knows he has to be brave for a groom he takes a deep breath and sighs out. He tries very hard because he gets liver treats for being a good boy. He's pretty tired tonight too. He had a lot of fun playtime today and yesterday with some doggy friends.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
For getting him to le on his side or back, how does he feel on your lap? When I need Perry on his back I sit on the floor with my legs or in front of me and I gently put him on his back cradled on my legs, treating if needed. He's a lot more comfortable in my lap like they then he would be if I tried to por him on his back on a table. You could try it on your lap first and then transition to the grooming table.
I wish he was comfortable this way, but no matter how I hold him on his back he finds it pretty uncomfortable. I know I can train him to be on his back, but it's just another thing to train..on my list of training things to do 😭 He's always been uncomfortable being held on his back, though he does love to sleep on his back lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I would skip the wood pin brush for now if you plan to keep him in full coat. IMO, it is only useful for fluffing when you are drying him. Spend your money on a CC Ice Slip brush instead. This will do everything the wood pin brush will, it is more durable, and it will move through a full coat better. It doesn’t look like Enzo has much under coat yet, and a wood pin brush won’t even START to go through any undercoat.

For a slicker type brush, I do NOT like the CC brushes, so save some money there! The ones I like best are WICKED expensive and imported, (Le Pooche) so skip those. ALMOST as good is the Artero double sided slicker: https://smile.amazon.com/Artero-Small-Double-Sided-Slicker/dp/B06XPPM7B8/ref=sr_1_2?crid=3M5657R7E8H0F&keywords=artero+grooming+products&qid=1668738576&sprefix=Artero,aps,86&sr=8-2&th=1

Or if you want an even cheaper one, this one is not at all bad either: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B07B267...t-supplies&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9kZXRhaWw

In terms of what tool to use when, I think it is a matter of learning your own dog’s coat to some extent. I don’t always use the same tools on each dog. Their coats are all different. My go-to tool is ALWAYS a Buttercomb or Greyhound comb (they are more expensive) but when Kodi was in full coat and for Panda, I usually used the finer end.

For Ducky, his coat is SO dense, that I couldn’t possibly get the fine end through his coat until he is COMPLETELY combed out with with wide end. I’m guessing that you would use almost exclusively the fine end on Enzo, unless you hit a mat.

For Ducky, I start with him standing on the table in the grooming loop, and comb him all over, using Ice on Ice, starting on his shoulders, and chest and working back. First one side, then the other. I feel underneath for any “trouble spots”. If there is just something tiny that I can get with him standing “by feel”, I do it. If not, I get him out of the loop, lay him down and deal with it. FORTUNATELY, this happens less if I keep him really clean, and also as he matures. He is now 19 months old, and I have been REALLY lucky that he has never blown coat heavily. When he DOES have matting that needs to be addressed under there, I take him out of the loop and lay him down. I really douse the mats with Ice on Ice and VERY carefully tease them apart. (also, any mats in his groin or around his sheath I just remove with my Wahl Peanut trimmer. This counts as “sanitary area, and is FINE for you to clean up with trimming! Don’t hurt your dog de-matting these areas or in the arm pits!) I am SUPER careful not to pull on him him so he has no reason not to trust me when he is lying down! Cookies the MOMENT I’m done with that!!! After I comb him through, I use the slicker to fluff his feet, then the face comb on his mustache and beard. (Fine end of THAT in the corner of his eyes) Then I take his head out of the loop and ask him to put his head down on the table for me to do his head and neck. I comb his head, neck, and ears with the regular comb, then go back to the face comb to part his pony and put it up. AND… he’s done!

BTW, how are you trimming his nails and feet at this point if you aren’t using a grooming loop? I can’t imagine doing that with the dog loose. I actually do groom Panda loose for most things, but even she, as good as she is, is in the grooming loop for feet and nails!

Also, I meant to ask. Are you doing this process daily with Ducky? I try to brush Enzo daily but sometimes have to skip a day. It's not the end of the world but it helps keep sessions a bit shorter. I know dogs being shown need to be brushed and bathed frequently..Enzo I bathe weekly but I have heard show dogs are sometimes bathed 2 times a week.
 

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Thank you for all of this! I am probably going to read through it a few times again to make sure I absorbed everything lol. I do need to order some Ice on Ice, do you use the detangler/finisher or dematting spray? I am using some puppy fur detangler I picked up at the store and I'm not a huge fan.
I've tried a lot of different ones, and IMO, none are as good as Ice on Ice.

Also yes, Enzo is only 7 months and hasn't developed his undercoat or blown coat yet. I'm not looking forward to it. Hoping it won't be so bad that I have to shave him, but hair grows. It won't be the end of the world.
It's NOT the end of the world, but you can avoid it if you are diligent about the grooming, and a little more insistent on his behavior on the grooming table. Keep in mind that gentle insistence in this area, in the long run, is what is best for him. Cutting him down is FINE if your goal is a pet. It will NOT solve your problem if your goal is to show him. You NEED to teach him to behave for grooming, and that is MUCH better taught while he is young than to try to convince him when he is an adult and has already experienced the discomfort of matting.

His groin definitely gets messier since he licks it after he pees (nice, right) so I'm wondering how one would use the peanut trimmer to clean up the area without trimming too much. I will likely order one since right now I just have some grooming sheers, and they aren't really great for matts.
It really isn't safe using shears under there. One wrong move and you can slice him. Then he will lick and cause infections... then the dreaded cone... With the peanut trimmer, you can just lightly skate over the surface. I try not to trim right to the skin, which makes them itchy. But most of the little mats under there, I find are actually held a bit away from the skin on little single hairs and it is usually easy to scoop under them and remove them. It might help to have someone else hold his front feet up from behind, so you can get a good view of his underside from the front while you are doing it. I've gotten to the point that I can do it "Braille method". You CAN'T cut him with the clippers. (you can prove this against your own hand)

As for his nails - I honestly usually have a helper either hold him or give him treats while I trim. He does better when he's hovering above the ground for a trim.
That works for nails, and maybe even paw pads, though it means you always have to have a second person. It does NOT work for trimming feet. For a dog in coat, the feet have to be trimmed even with the ground... Meaning that the dog needs to be standing still on a level surface as you trim...

I admit I've made a lot of mistakes with him since he's my first puppy and my first experience with a drop coated dog. I really want to keep trying my best with him even if it means we have some hiccups along the way. I guess my biggest concern is turning him into a dog that tries to bite groomers, which might be silly since he has such a sweet and placid demeanor.
That is a good goal, but it is more likely that he will not tolerate a groomer if he is babied too much. He needs to accept that sometimes things will be done to him that he doesn't really want, and he needs to accept it anyway. You should expect that a groomer always handle him GENTLY, but a groomer should not have to baby him or put up with nonsense. ;)

Although, I felt like tonight's grooming session went well. He squirmed just a little at first but relaxed after I encouraged him and went slow. He did have some matts in his armpits, where he usually gets them. If i knew it was ok to trim them out I probably would have done that but he did ok when I combed them out. He seemed to be somewhat more comfortable on my lap. If he knows he has to be brave for a groom he takes a deep breath and sighs out. He tries very hard because he gets liver treats for being a good boy. He's pretty tired tonight too. He had a lot of fun playtime today and yesterday with some doggy friends.
I would REALLY stop the lap grooming. For two reasons. First, it will eventually make your lap an aversive place. Second, and MOST important, it will be absolutely impossible to groom him completely there once his coat really comes in, and ESPECIALLY while he is blowing coat. While you are trying to groom some parts, the parts in contact with your lap are going to rub other mats into him.
 
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Metrowest, MA
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I just posted a video of grooming Ducky for you. I started a different thread, since it isn't specifically about belly grooming! LOL!
 
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