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Metrowest, MA
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@krandall @mudpuppymama thanks for sharing! I just looked at the butter combs and there are SO many! Any particular ones that you really like or are more all-purpose, or do you really need the specific ones? I already spend (way) more on Charlie’s haircuts each year than mine (and about to double that…), so seems fitting that the same would go for brushes and combs! 🤣
Here is the feet and face comb I would order:


Here is the Buttercomb I would order:


I don’t usually bother with the colored ones because they are more expensive, but that seems to be all that is available in the face and foot one right now.

DO NOT order from Amazon right now… Their prices on CC stuff is ridiculous!!! Cherrybrook still has the regular prices… which is already plenty expensive!
 
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For Perry in a puppy cut I almost exclusively use the CC 006 all over his body (which, since he's in a short cut, is mostly head/ face/ legs/ tail). I love it because it is a shorter comb so is easy to maneuver around a small dog who doesn't really like his face being combed :)

I have a CC oblong pin brush but really only use it when he's a little itchy and needs a full body "scratch" - so I use the pin brush to give him a massage/ scratch... I sometimes use it on his tail as well, but the comb works better overall.
 

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One interesting thing about Mia. When she was in a puppy cut, she HATED me combing or brushing her legs. She was okay with all else but forget the legs! Now that her hair is longer, she does not mind me doing anything to her legs!
 

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Metrowest, MA
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One interesting thing about Mia. When she was in a puppy cut, she HATED me combing or brushing her legs. She was okay with all else but forget the legs! Now that her hair is longer, she does not mind me doing anything to her legs!
Huh! That's interesting!!! Pixel HATES getting any mats on her legs!!!
 

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Perry doesn't mind me doing his back legs and feet, but anything to do with touching his front legs - especially the feet - is EVIL and must be avoided at all costs!
Mia has always disliked me brushing or combing her legs, especially the front legs. That is one reason I always kept her very short because I feared her legs would become a matted mess. However, to my surprise as her hair has gotten longer she does not mind me brushing or combing them! She actually loves to be groomed, even her legs! I have to admit this was a total shocker for me! So far at the length she is at, she has not gotten any mats. I am not sure if she will start matting if I continue to let her hair grow.
 

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Fascinating about Mia… maybe there’s hope for Charlie yet!! Appreciate all the specifics on the CC brushes and combs. Going to try them on Charlie and see what he thinks 😊
Good luck! Note that I give Mia part of her daily food ration as treats during grooming! So that is most likely what she likes best about grooming! And a trainer once told me they had never ever seen a more food motivated dog than Mia!
 

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Perry doesn't mind me doing his back legs and feet, but anything to do with touching his front legs - especially the feet - is EVIL and must be avoided at all costs!
Sundance used to hate all of his feet and legs being touched but the last year or so I’ve really worked on it and he is really good about his back legs now. I’m not especially hopefully about his tolerance improving on his front legs. I try to just go fast and do them last.
 

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One thing I have found helpful for front leg “phobia” is to try to avoid approaching my dogs from the front. If I approach my yorkie’s legs from the front he becomes a prancing pony. However, if I approach from either the back or the side he is much better. Surprisingly, I can do a very thorough job on the front legs without approaching from the front, although I do feel a bit contorted!!!
 

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Sundance used to hate all of his feet and legs being touched but the last year or so I’ve really worked on it and he is really good about his back legs now. I’m not especially hopefully about his tolerance improving on his front legs. I try to just go fast and do them last.
Yep, that's how we do it. All of the rest of the body gets done and then we move to the front legs. I will put him on my lap to comb the legs, but then to do the feet I often have to put him on his back lengthwise on my legs so I can get a good grip (and can see) his feet. Since it will be a while until he can get properly groomed, the pads of his feet were seriously overgrown so I grabbed the tiny clippers the other day, flipped him over and did his pads. He barely squirmed for the back feet but the minute I touched his right front foot the squirming began. I have to say he was actually better than he's ever been (I wonder if it was because there wasn't a full grooming right before that so his patience level was better), and I only had to do the right because the left is still in the "cast".

I've been working on desensitizing his feet for the whole time I've had him... often just touching them without doing anything throughout the day. Any time you try he wants to pull it away and, if possible, tucks them under his body so you can't touch them. It's mostly the feet. He's still not happy about the legs, but they're slightly easier than trying to do anything with the feet. And heaven forbid there is a matt - even a slight tug will get you a piercing whimper that makes it sound like you were actually trying to cut off his feet not just comb them! (Of course he doesn't realize that if he wasn't fighting me so much and I had to hold the foot with one hand and if I could actually use 2 hands on the matt it wouldn't pull so much!)
 

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One thing I have found helpful for front leg “phobia” is to try to avoid approaching my dogs from the front. If I approach my yorkie’s legs from the front he becomes a prancing pony. However, if I approach from either the back or the side he is much better. Surprisingly, I can do a very thorough job on the front legs without approaching from the front, although I do feel a bit contorted!!!
Front, back, side, upside down... front feet are no bueno :) even casually, lightly touching them when he's sitting beside me on the couch or on my lap, nope. There's no aggression or anything, just serious avoidance strategies (including quickly tucking them under the body and putting the head down over them for good measure!)
 

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Front, back, side, upside down... front feet are no bueno :) even casually, lightly touching them when he's sitting beside me on the couch or on my lap, nope. There's no aggression or anything, just serious avoidance strategies (including quickly tucking them under the body and putting the head down over them for good measure!)
Well the front feet have tended to be more of an “off limits” area than the entire front leg. However, approaching the legs from side and back has really helped the leg front leg phobia for my dogs. My yorkie still does not like the front feet touched but at least I can get his front legs done now without a fight.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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One thing I have found helpful for front leg “phobia” is to try to avoid approaching my dogs from the front. If I approach my yorkie’s legs from the front he becomes a prancing pony. However, if I approach from either the back or the side he is much better. Surprisingly, I can do a very thorough job on the front legs without approaching from the front, although I do feel a bit contorted!!!
While the program is MEANT for showing dogs in conformation, Jane Lindquist, who wrote Puppy Culture, has another, shorter program called "Killer Free Stacks" that would help people a LOT with this stuff as well as with other table/grooming handling. (like mouth handling for brushing teeth, etc. I am working through this program with Ducky, and he will now stand still as I handle and move any foot independently. Now, he is not hard to groom, but I can see how I could easily go from this to click/treating for allowing me to groom each leg. If people are having a really hard time, ESPECIALLY with a younger dog, I really suggest investing in this (quite inexpensive!) program. You can get it either on DVD or streaming.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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Well the front feet have tended to be more of an “off limits” area than the entire front leg. However, approaching the legs from side and back has really helped the leg front leg phobia for my dogs. My yorkie still does not like the front feet touched but at least I can get his front legs done now without a fight.
Approaching the front feet from the back for Dremeling (i.e. holding the foot as a farrier would, for trimming a hoof) was a game changer for me in learning to Dremel my dog's nails. Before that, I had had a horrifying experience, where I tried to Dremel Kodi's front nails, he got his (then long) mustache too close, got his mustache caught in the Dremel, flung his head up, which flung the Dremel across the room and tore out a chunk of mustache!!! It was over a year (and a lesson from a groomer friend where I learned the holding the foot backward trick) before I touched the Dremel again!!! LOL! I NOW know that the Dremel actually stops before it does any real harm if it gets caught in the coat, giving you time to unwind any caught hair... the harm was done by Kodi flinging his head. But it still traumatized both of us! LOL!
 

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Approaching the front feet from the back for Dremeling (i.e. holding the foot as a farrier would, for trimming a hoof) was a game changer for me in learning to Dremel my dog's nails. Before that, I had had a horrifying experience, where I tried to Dremel Kodi's front nails, he got his (then long) mustache too close, got his mustache caught in the Dremel, flung his head up, which flung the Dremel across the room and tore out a chunk of mustache!!! It was over a year (and a lesson from a groomer friend where I learned the holding the foot backward trick) before I touched the Dremel again!!! LOL! I NOW know that the Dremel actually stops before it does any real harm if it gets caught in the coat, giving you time to unwind any caught hair... the harm was done by Kodi flinging his head. But it still traumatized both of us! LOL!
Good analogy! I actually trim Mia’s paw pads using scissors from the back and she stands there perfectly still while I do it. There is something they prefer about approaching from the back! Mia prefers me using scissors too and is so good for it that I use that vs. the trimmer.
 

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Oh my goodness— these brushes are a miracle!!! I got the ice slip brush and the two combs you recommended, plus one of the tiny wooden ones. They arrived yesterday and I started with the wood one. He LOVED it. The same dog who usually tries to hide when he sees me getting grooming supplies laid on his side with a blissed out look on his face, and when I stopped looked at me like ‘excuse me, keep going!’ I’m going to introduce the new combs slowly (and when he doesn’t really need combing so he’s not tangled at all) so I build up a good association with them too. Thank you so much for the recs— my husband thought I had lost it when I told him I was ordering over $100 of grooming tools, but it’s so worth it if it makes for less stress for my guy and future pup.
 

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I just ordered a new comb after mine was missing for a week. I found it yesterday stuck in the actual leg of the sofa but the new one is coming so lucky me :) I knew the old one would turn up eventually so I got a face and feet comb even though I have both of those “pins per inch” or whatever as separate combs (somewhere anyway). I think I might like the dual sides but we’ll see.
 

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I just ordered a new comb after mine was missing for a week. I found it yesterday stuck in the actual leg of the sofa but the new one is coming so lucky me :) I knew the old one would turn up eventually so I got a face and feet comb even though I have both of those “pins per inch” or whatever as separate combs (somewhere anyway). I think I might like the dual sides but we’ll see.
I love the dual sides... I am constantly flipping it around to go from wider to narrower if I run into a tangle or just to get closer to the skin. It's the only comb I ever use and would definitely (personally) prefer it to having to switch combs.
 

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Mando loves the wood pin brush, too. I use the 006 on him to get any mats out. I ordered the 000 comb since he was getting big and I figured it might cut down on the grooming time. Now I’m wondering if I need the ice slip brush or fusion pin brush. What are they used for and do you think it’s needed if I keep Mando in a puppy cut? He hasn’t started blowing cost yet but I’m bracing for it.
 
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