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Discussion Starter #1
Help please! I've been told by several breeders in England (I live in London) that Havanese puppies mature slowly. At what age do you allow your litters to go to new homes? A breeder that I'm interested in doesn't allow her puppies to leave until they're 10 weeks. Since I live in a city, I will need to do a lot more socialization than the average owner which is why I'd like to pick up the pup at 8 or 9 weeks. With my other dog, I carried her all around London until she was able to be put down and she's now bomb proof with noises and strangers. I'd really like to do the same with the new puppy because it gives the dog a great foundation. Also, UK Havanese breeders only test the health of dog's eyes. Is there anything that I should look for as a visual clue to patella health in the dogs themselves (both parents and puppies)? Your help is really appreciated since the Havanese is very rare in Britain and information thin on the ground.
Thanks,
A.W. Edwards
 

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Mom to Dusty and Indie
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A couple of resources about puppy development that I came across while we were researching. One is a website I found and the other is a book our breeder recommended.

http://www.diamondsintheruff.com/DevelopmentalStages.html

How to Raise a Puppy You Can Live With by Clarice Rutherford and David Neil

These both talk about developmental stages and socialization. It sounds like you've done this before. When we were looking for a puppy, sending them to new homes at around 9 or 10 weeks seemed the norm. I don't remember any that would let them go sooner. I bet a good breeder will be willing to discuss this with you, since you and the breeder will be looking out for the best interests of the puppy.
 

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Kimberly
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My puppies stay with me until 10 weeks also. I let one go at 9 weeks last time, but that was a very unusual situation and I probably won't do that again.

Havanese are very social and need to learn dog manners from their mothers, so I prefer they stay with me (and their mother) for at least 10 weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info. I'm hoping to coax the breeder into letting me have the puppy at 9 weeks. You can socialize up to 16 weeks but, the best period ends at 12 weeks. London's fantastic for dogs (no leash laws in certain parks and loads of nice doggie friends) but, it does take some getting used to considering the noise and crowds. I'd still love some info from a breeder regarding hips and patellas, please.
 

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Quincy's Mom-Vinnie too!
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There is a great havanese book out there called "The Havanese"by Diane Klumb...it actually shows normal hips and dysplastic hips and discusses different abnormalities etc.in the breed.I would highly recommend you getting the book or perhaps trying to get it at your library.I did not get my guy till he was 16 weeks old,and it worked out great for us.He was slightly over 5 pounds and just like a sponge absorbing what we wanted from him.I think it is the norm for puppies to find homes (go home)I mean at 10-12 weeks.Havanese are very social by nature...I don't think you would have any trouble socializing your new pup to the environment,even if you waited.:D
 

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You can't tell by looking a young puppy if they will have bad hips and patella's. Quite honestly, you can't really tell on the adults either, unless they are lame. The only way to know for sure is doing xrays and have a vet check the patellas.
 

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Quincy's Mom-Vinnie too!
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Kathy,
Oh,I didn't mean to imply you could check your own pup......just simply that it shows pictures (X-rays) so you can actually see what they are talking about.I found the book very informable.
Thanks.
 

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Julie,
lol, I wasn't responding to your post, but rather giving in to awedwards when he asked: "I'd still love some info from a breeder regarding hips and patellas, please." He had said already that breeders in the UK don't do any other health testing other then CERF, so was trying to explain there really isn't a way to know if the puppy, sire, or dam have good or bad patellas or hips without testing.

Sorry, I wasn't very clear! Darn typewriter, it should know what I am trying to say, gosh darn it!!! lol
 

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Julie, I noticed that you got your puppy at 16 weeks. We may be getting one at 15-16 weeks. Do you, or anyone out there who can comment, think there is an advantage or disadvantage to getting a puppy at 16 weeks instead of the more normal 10 weeks? At 16 weeks, do you think there might be more separation, socialization or potty training issues? Just wondering...
 

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Kimberly
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Jan, in my opinion, you're at the advantage getting it later, assuming the breeder has invested time in training (including potty training).
 

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Quincy's Mom-Vinnie too!
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I couldn't say really one way or the other since Quincy is my only hav.For us though,it was great.Quincy had a very good breeder who was working with him as a show dog...he stacked at 16 weeks on the vet table,and still does,though I have never shown a dog before.He was completely housebroken at the breeders house,though at mine,I had to start over,but I didn't have near the problems or the length of time invested (I don't believe)had we got him younger.I would say it took another 3 months to housebreak him,and feel confident.I liked his size too.He was 5.3 lbs.and just a really nice size to work with.He leashed trained for me after just a walk or two......grooming was fabulous.He was used to it,never has fussed-ever.He really is just an all around great hav...and I'm not sure whether it was his age,or the breeder or most likely the combination of them both.For me,as cute as the little ones are-I wouldn't hestitate to take an older pup.:)
 

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Mom to Dusty and Indie
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I agree with Julie. There are advantages to an older puppy. We got Dusty at 7 months from her breeder who had kept her as a show prospect. She was housetrained to pee pads and outside, crate trained, ate her meals in her crate, was used to an ex-pen, and knew to sit for a treat. She was used to being handled and groomed, so we had an easy time learning to groom and do nails. This saved us a lot of headache and has made us feel like very competent dog owners! She also adjusted quickly to our house. She had only a couple of accidents and quickly figured out how to let us know when she wanted to go outside. We were concerned an older pup wouldn't bond well with our family, but that turned out to be worrying over nothing. She loves everyone. We'd go for an older puppy again in a heartbeat.
 

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Valentino's Mom, Vicki
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After reading your experiences and also others on the forum I will definitely get an older puppy next time. I do love puppies but not sure I want to go through all the hoops necessary to get them where they need to be. It's like having babies again!:eek: I like the fact that training has already begun esp. the housebreaking part! I was always concerned about the bonding part but sounds like that shouldn't be a problem either! Both of you have gorgeous havs! By the way since I am a novice in the area of show dogs....what does "stacking" mean?:confused: Vicki
 

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Quincy's Mom-Vinnie too!
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stacking( by my definition )is when they are kinda posed on a judges table at a dog show,or they are stacked on the floor(meaning their hind legs are kinda back alittle extra far and even with each other,the front is nicely lined up even with each other too.Next time you see a dog show or even on the AKC site you will notice what I mean.:)
 

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I got my first Havanese after 11 weeks . I think this was ideal . Logistics with the breeder made it impossible to get him sooner and they are supposed to have a fear period and they recommend they stay with the mother .
I got Cosmo at 9 weeks . It was OK but in retrospect I think it was really a little early . I think he would have benefited with more time with his litter mates and his mother .
 

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At about 8 weeks they really start to play rough. They learn a lot about how rough is too rough from their littermates and their Mom. That's the main reason we like to keep them until 10 weeks. Of course an experienced dog person can handle it, but I wouldn't want to place an 8 week old with a new dog family. Also it depends on the individual puppy's temperment. An omega would probably do fine. An alpha with a new timid owner-NO WAY.
 

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Thanks everyone...this forum is great for prospective havanese owners, very helpful. I've ordered the 2 books mentioned in a different thread about havanese that were recommended highly. We want to be as prepared as we can be for our new little project when it comes!
 

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I tend to agree I got Cosmo at 9 weeks and I think it was too early .. I got my first dog Asta at almost 12 weeks . He spent more time with his mommy and his litter and he seemed less anxious and insecure .
I always thought Cosmo missed his Mom & his litter mates when I first got him . They talk about this seperation anxiety at 8 weeks . I would say get the puppy a little later . I also found his digestive tract was so sensitive and it caused me concern as I did not have any of those problems with Asta .. . I think 11- 12 weeks may be ideal for a new owner but I do not know how it goes from a breeder prespective . Maybe they prefer to have them leave sooner ..
I found it was hard to wait when but now I know the first breeder did the right thing .. :)
 

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We don´t give our puppies to early to their new families. That means : After someone of (Zuchtwart, I don´t know the English name) our registered society
has seen the babies . ( for pedigree). He is coming when the puppies are 10 weeks old. When they are 8 weeks old, they get their vaccinations, the microchip and a medical examination by a vetarinarian. After that ,they have to stay here for 2 more weeks. (It is better for keeping a healthy immune system) That means moving not before they are 10 weeks old.
Some German breeders give their puppies away with 8 to 9 weeks. I think that is to early.
 

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Hiro 23.03.2007
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We had Hiro at 10 weeks.
That's normal in Germany.
In the Netherlands you can have your puppy with 8 weeks.
The vaccinations are a bit different.
But Hiro was wurth waiting for.
 
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