Havanese Forum banner
21 - 29 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I wrote a negative review of the place we bought the puppy and the owner reached out the next day. Turns out my instincts were right! The breeders had health issues. The wife, who was always the one to care for the puppies fell ill so it was on the husband, who also had to care for his wife. Our puppy spent her first 10 weeks with little socialization or training. The owner took responsibility and offered to take the puppy and have their trainer work with her. She also specializes in behavioral therapy/training. Our puppy ended up staying a month. She came back much better. Not as skittish, better behaved. My husband does also remain her favorite chew toy. I'm trying to get him to be better about not allowing that. Husbands need training too LOL. She's drawn blood from me a few times. But overall she is better. I do think it's a combination of the training and the fact she is a month older. When everyone says give it time, I do believe they are right. We now use the zummies to get her energy out... which she has a lot of! She's five months now. Before when we tried to pick her up she ran away and when we did get her she would twirl like a tornado and try to bite our faces. Now she loves being picked up and she cuddles and doesn't try to bite our faces. I think the training really helped with that. When she tries to jump and bite you, try a sharp "NO" or make a loud sound. That helped with ours. The trainer said a big part of the training was to teach her she is not the boss. Hope this helps. I know it can be frustrating and tiresome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
This is a great report Dana. Thank you. Yes, we experience picking her up and having her try to bite our faces like a little tornado too. That's a perfect description. I read to make a sharp high pitch loud sound when she bites, but she just thinks I'm playing with her and comes back for more. Maybe my husband actually likes to get bitten ;-) She keeps breaking his skin, but not mine. I'm so glad that you have your dog back. I am exhausted! ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
My Jasper is 9 months old and my first Havanese. When he had his puppy teeth one thing that helped was to have toys close by all the time. When friends or family visited I made them all hold a toy so that Jasper could bite it instead of their hands. Just giving him a chew toys did not always work as well as holding it in my hand. Even now I sometimes hold the end of antler while he chews on the other end. Once he lost his baby teeth it was much better.

In addition to walks we play a lot of indoor fetch with stuffed toys. (I don't have a fenced yard). I don't know how common it is but fetch seemed to come naturally to him. When the energy level is getting to be too much for me, a few minutes of fetch really helps.

Jasper is very vocal. He barks for lots of reasons. I'm still learning his different barks and which ones I find acceptable. He's not alone very often but the amount of howling and barking when left alone has decreased over time. The first couple times he was left alone for a couple hours he even threw up. That doesn't happen any more.

We took a puppy class when he was younger. I needed training as much as he did. I found the class gave me some structure. I was able to focus on a few skills rather than getting overwhelmed with all the tings I want him to learn. Jasper did not experience any trauma before coming home with me but I know the trainer would have let me know if he needed any special training. Soon we will start another series of classes. Partly for the training, partly for the socialization in a controlled environment. I hope you can find help closer to home that allows you to participate in Lexi's training all along the way. I wish you luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Most of what you are describing sounds like normal puppy behavior to me. The Zoomies, backing away when you try to pick her up are just puppy games, and totally normal, IMHO. Puppies need to be walked and need playtime to burn off the energy. I initiate the Zoomies, just for the fun we share. The walks also help with the potty training. Be patient, they grow up to be dogs all to soon. :)
Thank you. I have Lucy Jo, just over a year. It's all great. But if the zoomies happen and she has run outside without her leash it's impossible to get her back. Any suggestions? I know its a game and I am in a very small rural community. I have her on a leash most times. But 3 or 4 times she has scared me. Otherwise everything has gone really well with my havanese. Thank you.
 

·
Metrowest, MA
Joined
·
32,278 Posts
Thank you. I have Lucy Jo, just over a year. It's all great. But if the zoomies happen and she has run outside without her leash it's impossible to get her back. Any suggestions? I know its a game and I am in a very small rural community. I have her on a leash most times. But 3 or 4 times she has scared me. Otherwise everything has gone really well with my havanese. Thank you.

First, put a gate across, inside, so she can't get to your door when you answer it!

Second, if, even in spite of this safety measure she STILL gets out, DO NOT CHASE her!!! EVER!!! As you've found, it quickly turns into a game, and dogs love it!!! (and they ALWAYS win!)

Instead, wander around slowly, keeping an eye on her out of the CORNER of your eye, without looking directly at her. Wait for her to slow down, while trying to maneuver yourself between her and anything dangerous, (like a busy street) When she slows down and stops actively running away, (she will) try squatting down on the ground and pretend to be INTENSELY interested in something on the ground. Start talking in a high pitched voice about how INTERESTING it is! Drop some treats on the ground there, and then pretend to start picking them up and eating them. There are few dogs who can resist this. They are EXTREMELY gullible!

NOW, it will be tempting to grab her as she comes close. It is REALLY important not to, if you want this to work more than once! Instead, when she comes over, continue your conversation, and companionably keep sharing the cookies you "found with her, and stroke her as you do. Sometime before the cookies run out (put more down if you need to) slip your finger in her collar, or scoop her up gently, and immediately tell her what a GOOD GIRL she is, and start feeding her even MORE cookies, NO MATTER HOW MAD YOU FEEL!!! This is really important! You want everything about coming back to you to be a positive experience so that she comes back faster the next time!

THEN start working more on recall training!!! ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Melissa Brill

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,472 Posts
First, put a gate across, inside, so she can't get to your door when you answer it!

Second, if, even in spite of this safety measure she STILL gets out, DO NOT CHASE her!!! EVER!!! As you've found, it quickly turns into a game, and dogs love it!!! (and they ALWAYS win!)

Instead, wander around slowly, keeping an eye on her out of the CORNER of your eye, without looking directly at her. Wait for her to slow down, while trying to maneuver yourself between her and anything dangerous, (like a busy street) When she slows down and stops actively running away, (she will) try squatting down on the ground and pretend to be INTENSELY interested in something on the ground. Start talking in a high pitched voice about how INTERESTING it is! Drop some treats on the ground there, and then pretend to start picking them up and eating them. There are few dogs who can resist this. They are EXTREMELY gullible!

NOW, it will be tempting to grab her as she comes close. It is REALLY important not to, if you want this to work more than once! Instead, when she comes over, continue your conversation, and companionably keep sharing the cookies you "found with her, and stroke her as you do. Sometime before the cookies run out (put more down if you need to) slip your finger in her collar, or scoop her up gently, and immediately tell her what a GOOD GIRL she is, and start feeding her even MORE cookies, NO MATTER HOW MAD YOU FEEL!!! This is really important! You want everything about coming back to you to be a positive experience so that she comes back faster the next time!

THEN start working more on recall training!!! ;)
All great advice. I find that the biggest "mistake" that people make when their dog gets loose is standing straight/ tall and calling for them. The way that is most likely to work is (like you mentioned) crouching down and either doing what you suggested OR if you need them to come back more quickly to try calling them in a high pitched excited voice while crouching down. I accidentally dropped Perry's leash when we were out walking one day (down the middle of our road) and he thought it was a great thing that he could go running (yes, his recall is not good at all)! Even though we have very little traffic I couldn't take the time to wait for him to slow down so I first did the usual standing there and calling him but he didn't come back so I crouched down to the ground with my arms out and called him very excitedly and he came running back.

Another thing that has been known to work (even if it makes you feel ridiculous) is to lie down on the ground - I think it's similar to Karen's recommendation to act like you've found something interesting - they just can't resist running back to figure out what's going on, why is Mom lying on the ground like that :)
 

·
Metrowest, MA
Joined
·
32,278 Posts
Another thing that has been known to work (even if it makes you feel ridiculous) is to lie down on the ground - I think it's similar to Karen's recommendation to act like you've found something interesting - they just can't resist running back to figure out what's going on, why is Mom lying on the ground like that :)
Yes! It can work even better if you act like you are hurt! They will come back to check on you! How do I know? Because at one show, I caught my foot on the ring gating and fell flat on my face. I let go of the leash, and Ducky scooted out of the way (thankfully) but then turned right back and came up to my face to check on me and make sure I was OK, even with a bunch of strangers rushing up to ALSO check on me.

(And yes, I was fine... Nothing hurt but my pride! It was in an indoor soccer facility, with a VERY forgiving floor! ;) )
 
  • Like
Reactions: Melissa Brill
21 - 29 of 29 Posts
Top