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I have a wonderful, happy go lucky super friendly and well behaved 12 year old Havanese. Today l was passing by a pet store selling puppies. I thought that it was outlawed so I went in just to see how the puppies were being treated. A lot of various small breeds yapping and jumping, but there was one 8 month old but tiny black and white Havanese sitting quietly bewildered. I was told he away beng rehomed because he owners were too busy to take care of him. I can’t stop thinking about that puppy. My head said no , but. Really fell for him.
I am elderly so I worry he will outlive me. Any advice?
 

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Metrowest, MA
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DON'T BUY HIM!!!

Buying puppies from pet stores only leads to more puppies being bred for pet stores and NO reputable breeder will sell their puppies to a pet store. 😢

If you want a Havanese, there is probably a way. Do you think you are up to raising a puppy? It's a LOT of work! But if you are up to it, the next thing to think about is to arrange for some one who will take your pet if, God forbid, something were to happen to you during his lifetime. ALL of us, regardless of our age, should really think that through, so you are not alone!!!

Once you have thought through those issues, if you have good answers to both, you are all set to approach some good, REPUTABLE breeders, looking for either a puppy, if that's what you want, or perhaps a retired adult breeding dog who is looking for their forever home. Those dogs are often PERFECT for an older person, because they are past their crazy puppy antics, generally potty trained, leash trained, and looking for nothing more than their own "person" to love!
 

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I have a friend who was 82 years old a couple years ago and in good health. She really wanted to raise another puppy. She talked with her family and her son and daughter-in-law agreed take in the new dog when my friend gets to a point that she is no longer able to care for him. This is the only way she was comfortable moving forward with getting her new puppy. The puppy is now 2 years old and doing great and keeps my friend active and happy. He also loves people and helps her stay social with her neighbors. Don’t purchase the puppy from the pet store. I know it is difficult not to feel sorry for the individual puppy but every purchase of a puppy from a pet store provides incentive for them to continue supporting puppy mills. You have a lot to think through.
 

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Thirteen years ago I made two big mistakes. I thought Mia needed a “buddy” (mistake #1) and I went into a pet store to get one for her (mistake #2). Back then I was clueless about everything dogwise. Anyway, my second dog is an amazing dog so I lucked out in that respect . However, the main point is that in doing so I helped support unethical breeders and for that I am truly sorry. If there is a next dog, it will be from a reputable breeder.

There will likely not be a next dog in my future because I don’t have anyone that can take them should something happen to us. I have someone who will take Mia and Bear if necessary, however they are even older than I am. I know someone who has no one to take her dogs and she has some sort of arrangement with an organization where they will take your dogs and find homes for them. I am not sure exactly how this works but it may be worth investigating. This woman is someone who provides very excellent care for her dogs and I would think she checked this out thoroughly. She also had two parrots who live very long lives. She gave the parrots to some sort of sanctuary and donated thousands of dollars to them to build some sort of giant cage for them. She did this while still living so she could see that this happened and know they will be cared for.
 

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There are a couple of issues here - some pet stores are not "selling" puppies but are showcasing rescues - so the "don't buy him" for me would depend on which it was. I also would probably have a hard time not getting the one being rehomed - even though it does mean supporting pet stores / selling puppies, the reality as we all know is that older dogs have a harder time being sold especially when puppies are there.

As for getting one as an older person - I wouldn't say don't do it, but make sure you have a plan and someone who is committing to taking them if anything were to happen to you.
 

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About being too old...I am old, single with no family at all in the US. I worry about what will happen to my dog should something happen to me even if it is a short term thing. Right now, my plan is that my brother would come from Canada and he would get my dog. Short term. he would have to be boarded until my brother arrives. Then he would have the journey back with a very carsick, motion sick dog. He is not getting any younger either.
There is a home for small dogs in my city that takes in small dogs to live out their lives if no one wants them. Right now, Shadow is young(5), healthy despite his car sickness and a very nice, friendly, housetrained dog. He would be a very easy dog to place but in 10 years maybe not so easy.
My ex-FIL adopted a 13 year old dog who was blind and diabetic from this place. He was about 80 then. Both of them are alive and enjoying life 3 years later.
Having a plan is a good thing.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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There are a couple of issues here - some pet stores are not "selling" puppies but are showcasing rescues - so the "don't buy him" for me would depend on which it was. I also would probably have a hard time not getting the one being rehomed - even though it does mean supporting pet stores / selling puppies, the reality as we all know is that older dogs have a harder time being sold especially when puppies are there.

As for getting one as an older person - I wouldn't say don't do it, but make sure you have a plan and someone who is committing to taking them if anything were to happen to you.
Most of the pet store I know that “showcase” rescues, do not keep them in the store, but bring them in for organized adoption days, so that the dogs have better quality of life the rest of the time. In places where they are only allowing stores to sell “rescues” they have developed a whole new cottage industry in breeding and procuring snd selling mixed breed dogs. Buyer beware…
 

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Metrowest, MA
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About being too old...I am old, single with no family at all in the US. I worry about what will happen to my dog should something happen to me even if it is a short term thing. Right now, my plan is that my brother would come from Canada and he would get my dog. Short term. he would have to be boarded until my brother arrives. Then he would have the journey back with a very carsick, motion sick dog. He is not getting any younger either.
There is a home for small dogs in my city that takes in small dogs to live out their lives if no one wants them. Right now, Shadow is young(5), healthy despite his car sickness and a very nice, friendly, housetrained dog. He would be a very easy dog to place but in 10 years maybe not so easy.
My ex-FIL adopted a 13 year old dog who was blind and diabetic from this place. He was about 80 then. Both of them are alive and enjoying life 3 years later.
Having a plan is a good thing.
The nice thing with Havanese is that we have Havanese Rescue. And Havanese with nice temperaments are SNAPPED up quickly. There are never enough to go around. So never forget that as an option!
 

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Metrowest, MA
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I've often pondered scenarios where the dog may outlive me. What has given me peace of mind is speaking with friends who have agreed to take the dog in the event of such misfortune befalling me, and the creation of a will that further specifies this detail, along with a monetary sum for its' upkeep.
It is HIGHLY unlikely at this point, because the Rocky is now 16 years old, but quite a while ago, even though my brother is FAR from an old man, he asked me if I would look after his dog if anything happened to both him and his wife, if something happened to both of them. Of course I would have agreed anyway, but he also INSISTED on putting money in his will to support his dog should this eventuality arise.
 

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I have a wonderful, happy go lucky super friendly and well behaved 12 year old Havanese. Today l was passing by a pet store selling puppies. I thought that it was outlawed so I went in just to see how the puppies were being treated. A lot of various small breeds yapping and jumping, but there was one 8 month old but tiny black and white Havanese sitting quietly bewildered. I was told he away beng rehomed because he owners were too busy to take care of him. I can’t stop thinking about that puppy. My head said no , but. Really fell for him.
I am elderly so I worry he will outlive me. Any advice?
I think it's wonderful that you want to give this needy puppy a home. I know these puppy stores are a serious problem, BUT, there are dogs there that really need a good home. It's hard, I know, but I would have to opt on the side of getting that little dog. I feel for you....it's difficult. As far as your age, my husband and I are older. I am 69 and he is 77. We thought about this issue before we got our little puppy who is now almost 11 weeks old and talked to our son about it. He will gladly take her if/when we can no longer care for her. Elderly people can give these little velcro dogs some of the best homes because of having the luxury of spending so much time for them. Wishing the best for you in your decision.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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I think it's wonderful that you want to give this needy puppy a home. I know these puppy stores are a serious problem, BUT, there are dogs there that really need a good home. It's hard, I know, but I would have to opt on the side of getting that little dog. I feel for you....it's difficult. As far as your age, my husband and I are older. I am 69 and he is 77. We thought about this issue before we got our little puppy who is now almost 11 weeks old and talked to our son about it. He will gladly take her if/when we can no longer care for her. Elderly people can give these little velcro dogs some of the best homes because of having the luxury of spending so much time for them. Wishing the best for you in your decision.
Except here's another thing with buying pet store dogs. You are often buying a sick dog, and that it WHY they are so quiet. So you are buying "trouble". Even if they are not sick THEN, NONE of them are come from properly health tested parents, so you can end up with all sorts of helth problems down the line, when you really want a wonderful, loving companion to spend time with...
 

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Except here's another thing with buying pet store dogs. You are often buying a sick dog, and that it WHY they are so quiet. So you are buying "trouble". Even if they are not sick THEN, NONE of them are come from properly health tested parents, so you can end up with all sorts of helth problems down the line, when you really want a wonderful, loving companion to spend time with...
I do know this and it's a sad mess all the way around. People on one side being abusive to dogs for profit and then on the other side are people like us trying to help these poor animals. I wish all these people would be held accountable and stopped, but it will never happen, at least not completely, and so here we are....caught in this not knowing what to do when we see these animals. Breaks my heart.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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I do know this and it's a sad mess all the way around. People on one side being abusive to dogs for profit and then on the other side are people like us trying to help these poor animals. I wish all these people would be held accountable and stopped, but it will never happen, at least not completely, and so here we are....caught in this not knowing what to do when we see these animals. Breaks my heart.
In THIS case, the best thing is to never buy pet store puppies; to never patronize pet stores that SELL puppies, and to support local legislation that bans the sale of puppies IN pet stores.
 

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Something that has come up in my area is a storefront where breeders are technically selling their puppies and the store is ”staging” to provide screening of the puppies and buyers. There are a lot of problems with this, but strictly from a health perspective, all of these puppies of different breeds and from different places are coming together into one place, so there are many complaints of illness. It’s popular in our area for people to take their children to visit the puppies during special hours where they have staff to help with handling. Before we started learning about puppies and breeding we went often just to visit, but now that we know better it’s heartbreaking. I can’t go in at all because I’m sure I’d be in the same situation as you, I’d fall in love with a puppy, then be in a position where I feel it’s wrong to support the business but I couldn’t leave the puppy behind. If you can be strong and not do it, I will encourage you, but I genuinely won’t judge you if you can’t resist the puppy you’ve already met. It’s the hard way of learning to never going inside, but until you’re in the position it doesn’t seem like it will do any harm. I do think you have to look at it as a rescue if you choose to get him. If the thought of a puppy is too much, consider that this puppy likely has additional challenges related to rehoming that will need to be addressed. Regardless of age, whether someone can take on a rescue or a puppy at a particular time in life may change and only you know if it's something you can do right now. If this little puppy has gotten you thinking you might like another dog and you have a plan for him if something happened, maybe seeking an adult dog through reputable breeders would be something to consider. I wish my dad could have an adult Havanese because I’ve seen how much Sundance loves him and I think it would be great for my dad, but he’s not ready to accept retirement yet and I kind of think by time he’s ready his health might not be conducive to it - he’s the kind of person who will work until his body is worn out. I wouldn’t want my parents to miss out on the joy a dog can bring out of concern for what would happen to the dog if they couldnt take care of it anymore, so I would be their contingency in a heartbeat. But, not everyone feels this way about family pets, or would be able to take care of a dog even if they wanted to, so a plan is important.
 
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