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How often do you bathe your Havanese

  • Once a week

    Votes: 8 24.2%
  • Once every two weeks

    Votes: 10 30.3%
  • Once every 3 to 4 weeks

    Votes: 8 24.2%
  • Once every 1+ to 3 months

    Votes: 8 24.2%
  • Once every 3+ to 6 months

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Once every 6+ months or more

    Votes: 1 3.0%
  • As needed, it varies greatly

    Votes: 3 9.1%
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Metrowest, MA
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I use a long scissors with a rounded tip and sort of lay the scissors flat in between the pads. No pointing of scissors down into the pad area. However, Mia stands like a statue. Otherwise, I would not do it. I have never cut her in all these years.
It isnot the point of the scissors that worries me. It is the blades themselves that are razor sharp. A sideways slip could leave a real slice. I MIGHT be able to do it on Panda, because, Like Mia, she is VERY compliant during grooming. Forget about the other wigglers!
 

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Owned by a Havallon
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2,534 Posts
It isnot the point of the scissors that worries me. It is the blades themselves that are razor sharp. A sideways slip could leave a real slice. I MIGHT be able to do it on Panda, because, Like Mia, she is VERY compliant during grooming. Forget about the other wigglers!
Definitely not for wigglers. I guess I am so used to it I don’t think of it as dangerous but I am very careful. I say if the clippers work, use those. But if I use those on Mia she will need chiropractic adjustments at the least. I am really fearful she will get hurt she hates it so much and is a super wiggler!!! Night and day!!!
 

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Metrowest, MA
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28,498 Posts
Definitely not for wigglers. I guess I am so used to it I don’t think of it as dangerous but I am very careful. I say if the clippers work, use those. But if I use those on Mia she will need chiropractic adjustments at the least. I am really fearful she will get hurt she hates it so much and is a super wiggler!!! Night and day!!!
Definitely use what works! And the best way is to get them used to things when they are very young! That‘s why Ducky got his nails Dremeled for the first time today! LOL! A little fussing and struggling initially, then he just sat in my lap, as relaxed as he normally is about clipping. Of course he got MEGA rewarded!!! STEAK!!! LOL!
 

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Owned by a Havallon
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Definitely use what works! And the best way is to get them used to things when they are very young! That‘s why Ducky got his nails Dremeled for the first time today! LOL! A little fussing and struggling initially, then he just sat in my lap, as relaxed as he normally is about clipping. Of course he got MEGA rewarded!!! STEAK!!! LOL!
Definitely best to start conditioning them as young as possible. However, for those who did not, know that there is hope. Mia has made a complete turnaround, although it took quite awhile and lots of treats, along with the right tools and a more experienced dog groomer mom.
 

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I can understand why you would feel this way. Mia stands perfectly still for me to do her paw pads with scissors and I make sure not to go to deep between the pads. However, when I try to use clippers she becomes a bucking bronco. I am actually more fearful of her hurting a joint or muscle when using clippers vs. the scissors. Mia is so amazingly good for paw pad trimming with scissors I am giving in to her on this one. I also prefer not to shave them because I believe a little bit of hair acts as protection for digging dogs which I have. I am not sure why she is so good for paw pad trimming because she is not as good for nail trimming. It may be because I am obsessed about paw pads and so I do them really often.
In terms of staying still, I might be able to do Perry's back feet but he hates hates hates anything touching his front feet (even just lightly touching them let alone actually doing anything to them) so I would never touch them with scissors even if I was confident. He's been like this since I got him - despite years of regularly just touching them, treats, etc. to try to de-sensitize him from it. The groomer does them with scissors though and while he does pull for her she's so much faster and confident.

To groom his pads (and do his nails) I have to flip him on his back and put him on (sometimes between) my legs while I'm sitting on the ground - it's the only way I can do it without worrying about him pulling / pulling a muscle or something.
 

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Owned by a Havallon
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In terms of staying still, I might be able to do Perry's back feet but he hates hates hates anything touching his front feet (even just lightly touching them let alone actually doing anything to them) so I would never touch them with scissors even if I was confident. He's been like this since I got him - despite years of regularly just touching them, treats, etc. to try to de-sensitize him from it. The groomer does them with scissors though and while he does pull for her she's so much faster and confident.

To groom his pads (and do his nails) I have to flip him on his back and put him on (sometimes between) my legs while I'm sitting on the ground - it's the only way I can do it without worrying about him pulling / pulling a muscle or something.
Some dogs may just be more phobic about foot touching no matter what you do. For example, my yorkie is still phobic but much better. Mia is a dream. Both have same owner. Luckily the yorkie has little or no hair between the pads so I lucked out there!
 

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Some dogs may just be more phobic about foot touching no matter what you do. For example, my yorkie is still phobic but much better. Mia is a dream. Both have same owner. Luckily the yorkie has little or no hair between the pads so I lucked out there!
That's why it's a good idea to make a point to handle a puppy's feet - spread the toes, massage the feet, touch their nails, etc. I was taught that way back when I took puppy classes with my corgi.
 

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That's why it's a good idea to make a point to handle a puppy's feet - spread the toes, massage the feet, touch their nails, etc. I was taught that way back when I took puppy classes with my corgi.
Absolutely - one (more) of the challenges of having a rescue :). I definitely tried to do that when I got Perry, but he was already 8 months old.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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Absolutely - one (more) of the challenges of having a rescue :). I definitely tried to do that when I got Perry, but he was already 8 months old.

And that's WAAAAYYY too late. Ideally, it should be started when they are almost newborn.
 

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In terms of staying still, I might be able to do Perry's back feet but he hates hates hates anything touching his front feet (even just lightly touching them let alone actually doing anything to them) so I would never touch them with scissors even if I was confident. He's been like this since I got him - despite years of regularly just touching them, treats, etc. to try to de-sensitize him from it. The groomer does them with scissors though and while he does pull for her she's so much faster and confident.

To groom his pads (and do his nails) I have to flip him on his back and put him on (sometimes between) my legs while I'm sitting on the ground - it's the only way I can do it without worrying about him pulling / pulling a muscle or something.
This is exactly what I do with Flo too!!!! If we are having a good foot day then I can leave her on my lap as opposed to in between my legs. If we are having a bad foot day she tries to kick me off with her back feet. Like Perry Flo doesn’t seem to mind her back feet being done quite as much as her front. I’ve also noticed her back claws seem to be a little softer too so I don’t have to spend as much time having paw tug of war🐾
 
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