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Okay, but tell me then why I can live with two Havanese who sleep with me, but half an hour in a house with a golden retriever and I am wheezing, sneezing and needing to leave?
 

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Dave T
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Okay, but tell me then why I can live with two Havanese who sleep with me, but half an hour in a house with a golden retriever and I am wheezing, sneezing and needing to leave?
Not sure , you should ask these people? But here's one explanation. ...."If a person is allergic, they may be best able to tolerate a specific dog, possibly of one of the hypoallergenic breeds. Dr. Thomas A. Platts-Mills, head of the Asthma and Allergic Disease Center at the University of Virginia, explained that there are cases in which a specific dog (not breed) might be better tolerated by a specific person, for unknown reasons. "We think there really are differences in protein production between dogs that may help one patient and not another," Dr. Platts-Mills said
 

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Elissa's and Ceylon's Mom
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I took Cey to the bank a week or so ago (as I always do if I can, when I have to go to the bank - everybody there just LOVES him) and when I was done, the teller I had been talking to offered to help the next lady in line. The lady refused, and said that she was very allergic to dogs, and that she wanted to wait for the other teller. I wanted to speak up and tell her that Cey was 100% Havanese and hypoallergenic, but I didn't - I will next time something like this happens though! I too have very bad allergies, but I've never noticed any allergy symptoms from Cey...
 

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Metrowest, MA
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Not sure , you should ask these people? But here's one explanation. ...."If a person is allergic, they may be best able to tolerate a specific dog, possibly of one of the hypoallergenic breeds. Dr. Thomas A. Platts-Mills, head of the Asthma and Allergic Disease Center at the University of Virginia, explained that there are cases in which a specific dog (not breed) might be better tolerated by a specific person, for unknown reasons. "We think there really are differences in protein production between dogs that may help one patient and not another," Dr. Platts-Mills said
That's very true, but it's also true that some breeds are worse culprits for a particular person than other breeds are. For me, all the oily coated out door hunting or water dogs are the worst. This can be SOMEWHAT alleviated by frequent bathing. (which those dogs typically don't get, just because of their size) My brother has a rescue hound from Kentucky. He's a neatnik, and that dog gets bathed weekly, just as most of us who have Havs and allergies do with our dogs. I'm LESS allergic to him than most hounds, but still more allergic to him by far than I am to any of the (many) Havs that I've handled.

Also, if it were specific to one dog, I would hae had more trouble when I went to pick Kodi up. We spent 2 days with his breeder (including sleeping there) and 11 or 12 Havs. If Havs were going to be a problem for me, I would have seen it there.

Allergy testing and studies like this can be useful in moving forward the body of knowledge we have about allergies IN GENERAL. I have found (living in a very allergic family) that they have less implication on an individual level. My so, who has severe (anaphylaxis which lands him in the hospital several times a year) allergies TESTS as being highly allergic to peanut butter. But he can and does eat that with impunity. With all their fancy tests, they can't tell us for sure what sends him into anaphylaxis.

As far as the early exposure helping... maybe for some people, but not for me. I was born into a house with a Pug, and that breed is one of the worst offenders for me in terms of allergies. It IS true that my body tends to adjust to specific animals I'm around all the time, if the allergy wasn't too severe to start with. For instance, I am less allergic to our own cat than I am to other people's cats. And this has been true of a long string of cats.:)

Allergies are a VERY individual thing, and from what I've seen, all generalizations about allergies are suspect.:)
 

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Metrowest, MA
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I took Cey to the bank a week or so ago (as I always do if I can, when I have to go to the bank - everybody there just LOVES him) and when I was done, the teller I had been talking to offered to help the next lady in line. The lady refused, and said that she was very allergic to dogs, and that she wanted to wait for the other teller. I wanted to speak up and tell her that Cey was 100% Havanese and hypoallergenic, but I didn't - I will next time something like this happens though! I too have very bad allergies, but I've never noticed any allergy symptoms from Cey...
Be very careful with that thinking. People can be allergic to other PEOPLE. So just because Havanese seem to cause less allergy problems than other breeds doesn't AT ALL mean that there aren't SOME people allergic to them.

Poodles are also considered a "hypoallergenic breed"... probably the first that had that tag attached. When I was in second grade, a woman brought her daughter's Poodle in to our class for show and tell. I told her and my teacher that I was allergic to dogs, but they lady said, "Oh, don't worry about it... no one is allergic to Poodles! The girl's desk was right next to mine, in the front row, so the dog was very close to me. Well, I ended up in the hospital that afternoon and was there for 2 days.

I prefer the term "low allergy" for this group of dogs rather than "hypoallergenic", because I don't think there is ANYTHING that NOONE can get allergic to... certainly not in the animal world.:)
 

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What the article didn't mention is sebum....skin oils are also a huge allergen... My belief is that havs are generally well tolerated because they produce less sebum. Of course it also means they are often itchy. (poor neezers) I can not go near a poodle. I did a lot of research and trials with a borrowed Hav before we got our boys.

I can occasionally be in a house of a dog I should be allergic to for longer than normal and not react. And I equate that to the individual dog. But I can be with 20 different Havanese (and all at once...lol) and as long as they are kept relatively clean I have no problem.

The biggest of all pet allergens is urine! People with allergies should be prepared to be allergic to their Havanese puppy until they are house trained and have more control so the urine does not run down the leg.

Also, the pet allergens are not the only culprit. Don't forget even in a puppy cut, your Hav is bringing in all sorts of pollen, dust, mold, animal waste, grasses, you name it every time they come in, even if you don't see it.

But to anyone going into getting a hav because you heard they were hypoallergenic, do not go into it lightly, my sister is allergic to my neezers. Try to find a Hav to borrow in your home for at least a week. Do it again, as allergies are often culmulative. And if you cannot find a Hav to borrow...at least find one to visit with hours at a time.

I believe most allergist (and therefore this study) really feel that a home with no pets is the best for an allergic person. And I don't disagree... If you are talking pure allergy health. My house is so much dustier than before the boys..let alone the animal and outdoor allergens...but the other health and mood benefits they provide, along with their lower allergen load a very good trade off.
 

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Dave T
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Discussion Starter #8
yeah I don't know what to believe of this . I'm sure more studies will come out.
 

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Tucker 2007-2020
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Allergy testing and studies like this can be useful in moving forward the body of knowledge we have about allergies IN GENERAL. I have found (living in a very allergic family) that they have less implication on an individual level. My so, who has severe (anaphylaxis which lands him in the hospital several times a year) allergies TESTS as being highly allergic to peanut butter. But he can and does eat that with impunity. With all their fancy tests, they can't tell us for sure what sends him into anaphylaxis.
Karen, two of my boys had severe food allergies. The doctor I finally found real help from was an MD that finally got tired of just treating symptoms and went into homeopathic medicine. He explained something to me that might help explain this ability for your son to eat peanuts. Analogy: picture our immune system as a barrel. Each person is able to control the amount of allergies they have as long as those allergens remain within the barrel. If your barrel fills up with the maximum amount of allergens it can cope with, the moment even a single drop of excess allergen drops in to make the barrel over-flow, it is THEN than the immune system goes into overdrive and symptoms set in. Every person's barrel is a different size. So, even if you are terribly allergic to peanuts, your body might be able to cope until you've reached your "barrel's" limit. Then, even a whiff of something you are mildly allergic to can push you over into the allergic reaction.

Anyway, it helped a lot with raising two boys that were allergic to many foods, and to allow them their occasional treats by watching their diets. Now, for my son that was allergic to peanuts (off-the-charts!) he never was able to enjoy that food. As you say, it is very much an individual thing, huh?
 

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Metrowest, MA
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What the article didn't mention is sebum....skin oils are also a huge allergen... My belief is that havs are generally well tolerated because they produce less sebum. Of course it also means they are often itchy. (poor neezers).
That would go along with my experience with hunting dogs... all of which have oily, weather resistant coats. I am highly allergic to the northern breeds too... I get itchy if I touch them.

The biggest of all pet allergens is urine! People with allergies should be prepared to be allergic to their Havanese puppy until they are house trained and have more control so the urine does not run down the leg.

Also, the pet allergens are not the only culprit. Don't forget even in a puppy cut, your Hav is bringing in all sorts of pollen, dust, mold, animal waste, grasses, you name it every time they come in, even if you don't see it.
Yes! And what they are washed in! The one time I was "allergic" to Kodi was when I tried another shampoo from our usual one. Now if I experiment, I do it at a time that I know, if I HAVE to, I can re-wash him!:biggrin1:
 

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Metrowest, MA
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Karen, two of my boys had severe food allergies. The doctor I finally found real help from was an MD that finally got tired of just treating symptoms and went into homeopathic medicine. He explained something to me that might help explain this ability for your son to eat peanuts. Analogy: picture our immune system as a barrel. Each person is able to control the amount of allergies they have as long as those allergens remain within the barrel. If your barrel fills up with the maximum amount of allergens it can cope with, the moment even a single drop of excess allergen drops in to make the barrel over-flow, it is THEN than the immune system goes into overdrive and symptoms set in. Every person's barrel is a different size. So, even if you are terribly allergic to peanuts, your body might be able to cope until you've reached your "barrel's" limit. Then, even a whiff of something you are mildly allergic to can push you over into the allergic reaction.

Anyway, it helped a lot with raising two boys that were allergic to many foods, and to allow them their occasional treats by watching their diets. Now, for my son that was allergic to peanuts (off-the-charts!) he never was able to enjoy that food. As you say, it is very much an individual thing, huh?
Unfortunately, T's allergist has given him that exact same lecture. But he's 18, and I have little control. This all started when he was 14, and it was already hard to really control his diet. And the one thing we KNOW triggers anaphylaxis is latex... If any one, anywhere in the food processing industry has touched his food with latex gloves, down he goes. We've had it happen even in places where he has eaten many times before and since, with foods that should be completely safe. It's LESS likely to happen at home, with minimally processed food that I cook, but we've even had occasional problems there.

At least now, the first thing he does when he goes into any restaurant is ask them to bring the BOX of gloves they use out for him to read, and make sure they aren't latex. He doesn't take any chances.:) (and it's amazing, in this day and age, when SO many people have at least mild latex allergies, how many restaurants still use latex gloves)
 

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Tucker 2007-2020
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Wow. That level of latex allergy is huge! But, so good your son is willing to go out to eat when he needs to take the responsibility to check for himself the safety issue of gloves.

Just in case you haven't used it, did you know that Buffered Vitamin C Powder is a natural antihistamine? It did help with my boys--so much so that my (then) 16 year old MALE would get himself a dose when needed, without my saying anything about it. For your son and his extreme reactions it might not do much, but if it even took the edge off it would be worth knowing about. Use 1-tsp stirred into any quantity of liquid, like water or juice, stir and drink. It is water soluble so if the body doesn't need it it washes out in the urine, no build up for toxic levels or such. It works within 10 minutes or so.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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Wow. That level of latex allergy is huge! But, so good your son is willing to go out to eat when he needs to take the responsibility to check for himself the safety issue of gloves.

Just in case you haven't used it, did you know that Buffered Vitamin C Powder is a natural antihistamine? It did help with my boys--so much so that my (then) 16 year old MALE would get himself a dose when needed, without my saying anything about it. For your son and his extreme reactions it might not do much, but if it even took the edge off it would be worth knowing about. Use 1-tsp stirred into any quantity of liquid, like water or juice, stir and drink. It is water soluble so if the body doesn't need it it washes out in the urine, no build up for toxic levels or such. It works within 10 minutes or so.
Hmmm. I'll look into it. But if you can taste it, he won't drink it. (he's also got all kinds of SI issues...)
 

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Tucker 2007-2020
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Karen,
It has very little taste, I've used it myself, it has a smidgeon of tang to it, like a drop of lemon juice might give. So, in orange juice it is tasteless, and added no texture at all. My son just put it it a small glass of water. His allergies hindered mental acuity and had many of the same symptoms as ADHD, and he'd get himself a dose at times when studying. For a teenaged BOY I think that is a pretty impressive testimonial.

It helped almost everyone we've told about it, at least those that had real significant allergic reactions. We had a teenager come over once that (we found out after he was already showing signs) was quite allergic to cats. (We had one.) I gave him a glass, with his mom's okay, and we continued visiting. After about 15 minutes I asked him how he was doing, and he had forgotten all about it and wasn't showing hardly any sign of the allergy.

If it does help, it seems to work within 10-15 minutes. I'd love to hear if it helps any of you--
 

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Metrowest, MA
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Cool! I don't know if I'll be able to get him to drink it... he doesn't do fruit or fruit juice. But _I'd_ like to try it!

My allergies were MUCH worse when I was younger, but I think that, in some ways, habituated me to them... it was just part of life.:) Now, when I DON'T have a lot of trouble most of the year, I am miserable when the right (wrong!) things bloom in the spring. Zyrtec and that sort of thing don't work very well for me, and while Benadryl will help with the allergies, it also puts me to sleep for the day!
 

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Flynn of Sir Winston fame
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Karen, what shampoo do you use on Kodi that works for you?
 

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"I AM the Brute Squad"
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wow... I don't know what I can add to the thread.

I do know that when we discuss the 'hypoallergenic' properties of Siberian cats, we alway say that hypoallergenic means that they have a lower count of the enzyme/protein which most people react to. So if a person just gets itchy eyes and the sniffles, probably they won't react. However, we strongly suggest they visit a Siberian cat. If the person's reactions are more severe than itchy eyes, we require a visit and will send fur samples first.

As for food allergies... been there, done that...
Lent sucks for me. That no meat on Friday means clam chowder which I adore but if I have any other shellfish during the week... my hands swell! so not fair.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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Metrowest, MA
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I can't find that anywhere around here--I've looked. Bummer.
I buy it online from Cherrybrook. I buy it by the gallon and it lasts a LONG time... And I bathe Kodi weekly.
 
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