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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I have a YouTube cannel, but it is NOT an organized "training" channel or anything... it is simply a place I dump "all the things". From stuff about my vivariums and aquariums, to family stuff, my horse's retirement, you name it! But you are welcome to poke around!: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbECzh2xq4HUJyREDzDfVEQ

Dogs are dogs, no matter what the size. I know these methods work on Bullmastiffs, and they aren't THAT different, temperamentally from English Mastiffs. ;) (they both drool too much for me, but teaching them to heel is (initially) easier on the back!!!)

I've had Havanese for 13+ years now, and they were my down-size training animals after a life-time of training hunters, jumpers and dressage horses due to Rheumatoid Arthritis. Havanese are a lot easier on the joints!!! Kodi, my old guy, was trained through Utility level, titled in Agility, Obedience and Rally and is STILL the highest ranked Havanese in World Cynosport Rally after 6 years, and the only one to ever achieve his ARCHMX in that sport. Unfortunately, a combination of a bad injury, Covid lay-off, and now failing eye sight have caused me to have to retire him, but he is still my "best boy"! This photo as taken when he was about 6, I believe, and is only a small portion of his life-time winnings.

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Except for the bottom row, which is Panda's, every ribbon in this room was won by him. And that doesn't really include the flats... Those are just all bunched together in big tassels on that post in front of the ribbon wall. Nobody could ask for a better "Novice A" dog!!! 💕
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WOW. That is so amazing -especially the high titles and ranking that still stands. I used to train horses as well my last was a Lipizzaner I was traing from a young colt and into 1st level dressage. I had a terrible car accident and a wonderful girl rode him for a year leased him and when I realized I would not be well enough soon or never she purchased him and went to college w him to train towards the Olympics. What noble and smart honest horses!
Part of the reason I downsized dogs as well. I researched so many breeds and feel so lucky I found these little guys.
I guess I was correct when I thought u handled your dog so well but I had no idea!!!!
Thanks so much for sharing and all the info.
Your dogs are superstars but then u r too !! They didn’t do it alone. That’s a lot of ribbons!
 

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No, the "spotting gene" determines how much white Havanese will have on them. I don't believe ANY Havanese have NO "Sp" gene, which is why even "almost solid" Havanese tend to have a couple of white toes, or a chin or chest spot. The ones with two genes tend to be the loud partis.

Now THIS is a supposition on my part, based on what I know from horse color genetics. But the other piece of how white color is laid down in horses is that it is "switched "on" and "off" by conditions within the womb. That is why you can get horses that are cloned, as is often done with polo ponies, that have markings that are not "identical". They will be in the same general areas of the body, but while one may have a white marking that ends at the pastern, another may have one that goes up to the knee.

I strongly suspect that that is exactly what we saw with the King's identical twin puppies in the spring, who shared a placenta. They HAD to be identical twins, yet one had much more white than the other. But the one with more white, was also much larger than Ruffin at birth. My GUESS is that that puppy got more placental support, which also somehow affected how the white marking gene turned "on" and "off" leaving him with more white than Ruffin has. I thought that seeing these two confirmed twins and being able to watch their development was extremely interesting from the color perspective as well as everything else!

They have not completely untangled the Belton gene yet, and we do not have a DNA test for it yet. We know that it is related to the "roaning" gene, but this gene is not on the same locus in all breeds, so it will take more work to nap it down for Havanese. It will be a good one to nail down, because in its extreme, it IS one that many breeders would rather avoid. (but that is another question... what are the modifiers? a little is fine! LOL!)
Fascinating! Yes, I’d imagine that breeders woud want to detect that one if at all possible. Even though Jolene’s Belton spots are pretty mild, it’s still a very different look than the pure white with symmetrical black spots that she had as a little pup.
 
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