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I was considering the flat Pet Awesome dog tray with grate that I’ve seen recommended on here, but I want something with sides for better containment of poo/pee. What do people think about getting this and having the puppy walk directly onto litter? Or will the litter end up all over the floor? Dimensions of each are almost identical.

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I was considering the flat Pet Awesome dog tray with grate that I’ve seen recommended on here, but I want something with sides for better containment of poo/pee. What do people think about getting this and having the puppy walk directly onto litter? Or will the litter end up all over the floor? Dimensions of each are almost identical.

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Depends on the puppy I’m afraid! Mine would try to eat the litter, or dig in it as a fun game, so we needed the grate. That said, I like the idea of something tall bc it lessens the chance they’ll get it halfway on the tray, which definitely can happen!
 

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Metrowest, MA
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I was considering the flat Pet Awesome dog tray with grate that I’ve seen recommended on here, but I want something with sides for better containment of poo/pee. What do people think about getting this and having the puppy walk directly onto litter? Or will the litter end up all over the floor? Dimensions of each are almost identical.

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It’s totally up to you. Some people are perfectly happy with open litter boxes. I am not. I walk around my house often in socks or bare fett. Stepping on pellets HURTS!!! I also have one dog with IBS, and when he has tummy problems, he will eat litter. That, I admit, is not a common problem.
I CAN tell you that I don’t find any advantage to “higher sides”. I have both kinds, and have had no more “misses” with the flat ones than with the ones with sides.

If anything, the biggest difference is size when it comes to poop. When kodi (my first litter trained Havanese got a little older, and I THOUGHT he was pretty well trained, suddenly I started finding poop near but not IN the litter box. I watched him, and realized that he always made a “circle as he prepared to poop. He had gotten big enough that he could no longer make his circle and remain in his box. If the “moment it” when his circle took him out of the box, that was where the poop happened. I got him a bigger box, and he never had another accident! We weren’t using the Pet Awesome trays at that time (they weren’t made then, and the ones that WERE made then, aren’t made now!) but the Pet Awesome trayws, being flat, can be butted up against each other, making a nice big space if necessary.
 

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Depends on the puppy I’m afraid! Mine would try to eat the litter, or dig in it as a fun game, so we needed the grate. That said, I like the idea of something tall bc it lessens the chance they’ll get it halfway on the tray, which definitely can happen!
Boys are perfecty capable of only getting their front feet into a box with sides too, believe me. ;) This is simply developmental. It just takes time for boys to figure out that what’s going on “back there”… matters!:ROFLMAO:
 

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I was concerned about the sides being high enough when I wanted to add a litter box upstairs where I had to place in on carpet. I bought one with 4” or so sides and I intended to place it on some kind of waterproof mat. It ended up being fine on it’s own. I checked with a light a few times to make sure there wasn’t any tiny pee spatter getting on the carpet and it was really completely contained. However in retrospect I think it’s possible that litter box was too small when Sundance stopped using it. Krandall mentioned it once, and i realized he had another tray in the basement that was the same size but flat, and he kept using it and didn’t miss the box. I think the higher sides made the smaller size more uncomfortable. For that reason I would go with a larger flat litter box (or 2 flat trays like Krandall mentioned) vs. a taller litter box. To me they’re less visually disruptive, since they are difficult to hide in my open floor plan.
 

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Thanks all - I found a much larger box with high sides so will give that a go first. If it doesn’t work, it can become toy storage. :)
Make sure it has a low opening on one side, though, for the puppy to get in and out, right?
 

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I don't understand why people are talking about litter boxes - it's a dog, not a cat! If you don't want to walk your dog (a basic requirement for a dog) then get something else! SMH.
Very true, they are not cats (though I think my younger one things she is sometimes the way she balances on the back of the couch!) But litter box training can be super helpful for a variety of reasons…. If you live in an apartment, for example, it’s not safe to take an not-yet-vaccinated puppy out onto the street to do their business. We raised our first pup in an apartment, but had a tiny shared yard that was safe to use. The tray (we used a grate-covered tray so he couldn’t chew the pads) was still super helpful late at night or early in the morning, so our downstairs neighbors didn’t have to hear us right outside their bedroom window when they were trying to sleep! We live in a very temperate climate, but I know a lot of people use in the winter too—- if you’re in the middle of a snowstorm, it can be hard to find a spot for a small dog to do their business. And having it can also be really helpful if you have to leave your dog, so they have somewhere to go (I know a lot of people have doggy doors, but that’s not safe for a small dog, at least where we are, because of coyotes and hawks). I think everyone just needs to do what works for their situation, and indoor training can be a helpful supplement to walks and outings outdoors!
 

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I don't understand why people are talking about litter boxes - it's a dog, not a cat! If you don't want to walk your dog (a basic requirement for a dog) then get something else! SMH.
Also, who is the adorable pup in your profile pic? We’d love to see more pics and get to know you and your dog!
 

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Very true, they are not cats (though I think my younger one things she is sometimes the way she balances on the back of the couch!) But litter box training can be super helpful for a variety of reasons…. If you live in an apartment, for example, it’s not safe to take an not-yet-vaccinated puppy out onto the street to do their business. We raised our first pup in an apartment, but had a tiny shared yard that was safe to use. The tray (we used a grate-covered tray so he couldn’t chew the pads) was still super helpful late at night or early in the morning, so our downstairs neighbors didn’t have to hear us right outside their bedroom window when they were trying to sleep! We live in a very temperate climate, but I know a lot of people use in the winter too—- if you’re in the middle of a snowstorm, it can be hard to find a spot for a small dog to do their business. And having it can also be really helpful if you have to leave your dog, so they have somewhere to go (I know a lot of people have doggy doors, but that’s not safe for a small dog, at least where we are, because of coyotes and hawks). I think everyone just needs to do what works for their situation, and indoor training can be a helpful supplement to walks and outings outdoors!
Not only ALL of what you have written, but MANY larger breed breeders are now discovering the joys of litter box training for their litters of puppies! So for someone to come on and act like this is something “not done” in the rest of the dog world… they are simply not keeping up with the times. MANY small breeds use litter boxes for the same reasons we do. There is no reason to restrict yourself to one or the other. And being open minded about a new method that makes life easier (and has never caused a single blockage in HUNDREDS of puppies I know of) seems only sensible to me. ;)
 
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I'm using washable pee pads now since Nikko tears up regular pee pads and eats the litter. I ended up using the litter boxes I purchase as a small bed and a toy chest. They are great for both. Indoor options are a must for me and I wish more breeders used them.
 

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I'm using washable pee pads now since Nikko tears up regular pee pads and eats the litter. I ended up using the litter boxes I purchase as a small bed and a toy chest. They are great for both. Indoor options are a must for me and I wish more breeders used them.
Be aware that washable pee pads often lead to puppies turning into dogs who can never differentiate between pee pads and other items made of cloth left on the floor. (like small scatter rugs, or a towel unintentionally dropped on the floor) This has become a long-term problem for SO many people I know who have used washable pee pads that I ONLY use them for whelping pen bedding.

It is very easy to use boxes that have grated tops so that a puppy cannot access the pellets, so they can't eat them. These are the trays I use, but I am sure there are others with adeqauate space under the grate also:

 

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If you are trying to repurpose something as a litter box you might want to try using pine pellets. An enormous bag is under $10 and they last forever. I’d be hesistant to do cloth because of my experience with paper. My breeder paper trained and I think it works for most families but it didn’t work out for us to continue. We aren’t total slobs but I think we’re messier than our breeder, who is very organized and probably never has stray paper around her puppies. I’d love to say we’re carefree but that probably makes it sound a little cuter than we are :) My kids do homework on the floor (they do have desks they don’t ever use), and both of them like to have Sundance keep them company while they work on homework. Multiple times Sundance proudly peed on homework. He also peed if mail fell on the floor in the kitchen, with perfect aim. He occasionally peed on stray paper after we switched to pine pellets but we finally got in the habit of keeping paper off the floor. In fact, the only accidents he was having involved paper, and they didn’t really seem accidental! The association was so clear, I wouldn’t dare create an association with cloth. We have carpet and rugs, but also my husband is notorious for leaving clothes next to the hamper instead of in it. Sundance also has an association with sawdust from pine pellets, but this is harmless because no one has sawdust lying around in their house. However I work a lot with wood in my garage and Sundance has peed on sawdust before. His aim is spot on, too. This tells me that litter box training is powerful and it works, but pine pellets are the best liner for us, and I keep the sawdust in my garage cleaned up. Which is actually a lot easier than keeping random papers off of the floor!

I make us sound terribly messy, but I think we’re pretty normal. I used to be kind of neurotic about cleaning and organizing and it wasn’t good for me. A few years ago I decided if I was going to stay up late it wasn’t going to be to wash the dishes, I was going to do something fun to relax, and clean in the morning.
 

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Be aware that washable pee pads often lead to puppies turning into dogs who can never differentiate between pee pads and other items made of cloth left on the floor. (like small scatter rugs, or a towel unintentionally dropped on the floor) This has become a long-term problem for SO many people I know who have used washable pee pads that I ONLY use them for whelping pen bedding.

It is very easy to use boxes that have grated tops so that a puppy cannot access the pellets, so they can't eat them. These are the trays I use, but I am sure there are others with adeqauate space under the grate also:

Yes that is definitely the downside. I use the pads in one room in the house and that seems to keep the area rugs and shower maps clean.
 

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I don't understand why people are talking about litter boxes - it's a dog, not a cat! If you don't want to walk your dog (a basic requirement for a dog) then get something else! SMH.
If you don't want to use one, then don't use one. Using a litter box does not mean that people don't walk their dogs or that their dogs don't go outside. It's an alternative - and one I wish I had when it's monsoon-like rain outside or 30 below windchill (or when we're traveling and Perry does NOT want to use a pee pad in the middle of a 20+ hour travel/ flight time with no access to the outside).
 
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