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Hello,

If anyone can help me, I would sooo appreciate it. I am going insane. My dog is 3-years-old and was pretty much potty trained outside and at night with pee pads. He NEVER peed on furniture. All of a sudden he is peeing everywhere and anywhere he pleases. I took him to the vet and got a urine sample - he has crystals in his urine but no infection. He is now on prescription food. The peeing inside has subsided but still back. We have kept him in our study now overnight b/c we can't take the peeing everywhere. For example, we got him out last night and 10:30 pm - took away his water at 8:30 pm, and got him outside at 7 am. He came upstairs in our bedroom after and at 9:30 am I found a huge pee in our bedroom. I took him out again around 11 - and he came inside and peed in our living room on a floor vase.

What am I doing wrong - please help? I love my dog, but this is making me furious!

Thank you!
Julianne
 

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Tucker 2007-2020
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He needs to see the vet. It sounds like he may have a UTI, which is painful as you probably know, and there is nothing he can do to help his accidents.
 

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Arf! Arf!
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Our Vet says crystals in the urine can be the result from some kibble food that are not properly balanced. I am surprised he didn't make some recommendations to you. I know you are now on prescription food. Have you tried SLOWLY (two to four weeks) changing his diet to another food? I would start potty training all over again - take him outside every 30 minutes for no more than 5 minutes each time. AND I would get a second opinion from another Vet. It sure sounds like he has a UTI that, if true, can be cleared up quickly with antibiotics.

Ricky's Popi
 
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Owned by a Havallon
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My understanding is that stones can cause frequent urination even if he does not have a UTI. Did you ask the vet if this could be the cause? Wondering too if the stones can be addressed somehow? Not sure if you are feeding dry food but my understanding is that dry food can increase chances of stones. If you do feed kibble, please add water to it.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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A sudden change of behavior like this has to come from SOMEWHERE. On the other hand, there is no reason that you need to allow him to pee all over the place either. You can understand that he has a problem, while still confining him to an area like the kitchen, with a pee pad or litter box where his accidents are easier to clean up when they happen until you figure out what is going on. But getting mad at him is NOT going to solve the problem. He can't solve this on his own.
 

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I would take him back to the vet and be persistent. In humans, kidney stones, as well as other problems in the bladder and kidney, can cause UTI symptoms to come and go, and urine cultures can come back negative. UTI’s can even clear on their own under some circumstances but then return. Trust your instincts that something is off.

I hate to say this, but an acquaintance had a major potty training regression and she realized after a couple of visits the vet assumed the dog wasn’t really well potty trained. I don’t remember what the diagnosis ended up being, it came up in reference to a vet to avoid and a recommendation for a veterinary specialist hospital, but the diagnosis wasn’t urinary related at all. Any medical problem can cause a change in potty habits, not just UTI, and vets sometimes do things like prescribe antibiotics when there isn’t a clear answer, because every once in a while the shot in the dark works. Definitely follow up and let the vet know there’s an ongoing problem.
 

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I would take him back to the vet and be persistent. In humans, kidney stones, as well as other problems in the bladder and kidney, can cause UTI symptoms to come and go, and urine cultures can come back negative. UTI’s can even clear on their own under some circumstances but then return. Trust your instincts that something is off.
We also got an antibiotic just in case... never missed a dose for 10 days.
[/QUOTE
Go back or at least take another urine sample in to be tested. One thing is that with the Urinary food, it encourages the dog to drink more water. More water=more peeing. He needs lots of water to flush out the bladder, do not restrict his water. His bladder is irritated by the cyrstals so he is peeing inappropriately trying to flush out his bladder.
Are you sure he actually swallowed the antibiotic? These little ones are very sly.
Stones can hide on xrays, if I remember right. I think he needs to go in again.
I had a dog with crystals. Had to take in urine samples after treatment maybe 4 times, every week or two. He later developed stones and had surgery. You don't want to go there.
 

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I’m giving up trying to quote part of what Tere said! I’ll figure the new stuff out eventually, I just get impatient with change.

I had kidney stones that did not show up on imaging and my symptoms came and went, and when they figured out what it was, I was also told not to restrict water intake. Lucky me, no accidents ;) But it is interesting to hear very similar advice was given regarding Tere’s dog, and even though it could be something completely different, it’s worth following up because there are other explanations for sudden accidents aside from UTI.

DS has kidney disease and it makes me curious about how they handle urine cultures in dogs. Sometimes dip tests for humans have low enough numbers they can have false negatives. I think there are other explanations for false negatives, too. If an infection is suspected they might treat anyway, because if the same urine test is sent to a lab for culture and antibiotic resistance, the small infection with a false negative could grow. However, In humans there usually isn’t reason to do this unless it’s a complicated UTI. Instead of sending it to the lab, they’ll give an antibiotic and say to come back if symptoms don’t improve. Still doesn’t necessarily mean UTI, but I’m curious how it’s handled since dogs can’t exactly communicate UTI symptoms, aside from accidents or problems.
 

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I’m giving up trying to quote part of what Tere said! I’ll figure the new stuff out eventually, I just get impatient with change.

I had kidney stones that did not show up on imaging and my symptoms came and went, and when they figured out what it was, I was also told not to restrict water intake. Lucky me, no accidents ;) But it is interesting to hear very similar advice was given regarding Tere’s dog, and even though it could be something completely different, it’s worth following up because there are other explanations for sudden accidents aside from UTI.

DS has kidney disease and it makes me curious about how they handle urine cultures in dogs. Sometimes dip tests for humans have low enough numbers they can have false negatives. I think there are other explanations for false negatives, too. If an infection is suspected they might treat anyway, because if the same urine test is sent to a lab for culture and antibiotic resistance, the small infection with a false negative could grow. However, In humans there usually isn’t reason to do this unless it’s a complicated UTI. Instead of sending it to the lab, they’ll give an antibiotic and say to come back if symptoms don’t improve. Still doesn’t necessarily mean UTI, but I’m curious how it’s handled since dogs can’t exactly communicate UTI symptoms, aside from accidents or problems.
I did want to say in my previous post that I agreed with you! I can't figure out this New Crap! Or how to edit, or how not to quote!
 

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Hello,

If anyone can help me, I would sooo appreciate it. I am going insane. My dog is 3-years-old and was pretty much potty trained outside and at night with pee pads. He NEVER peed on furniture. All of a sudden he is peeing everywhere and anywhere he pleases. I took him to the vet and got a urine sample - he has crystals in his urine but no infection. He is now on prescription food. The peeing inside has subsided but still back. We have kept him in our study now overnight b/c we can't take the peeing everywhere. For example, we got him out last night and 10:30 pm - took away his water at 8:30 pm, and got him outside at 7 am. He came upstairs in our bedroom after and at 9:30 am I found a huge pee in our bedroom. I took him out again around 11 - and he came inside and peed in our living room on a floor vase.

What am I doing wrong - please help? I love my dog, but this is making me furious!

Thank you!
Julianne
Right now you need to crate your dog, place in him in an ex-pen or have him on a leash with you. Don't withhold water. Don't allow him to have freedom to roam. Place a potty pad in the crate and ex-pen (or a potty tray with the pad under the grate). A dog is not housebroken if they are "pretty much housebroken," unless you are saying your dog is indoor-housebroken to a potty pad but doesn't sound like he is.

If he doesn't have any medical issues causing this problem, you'll need to go back to retraining him. My guess he's peeing during the daytime and you haven't noticed - yet.

Until you figure this out you must confine your Lovely!
 
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