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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear Havanese family,
Thank you all so so much for all your tips and suggestions in the previous post.
We are 8 weeks closer to bringing Cookie home and we just can’t wait. 😍🥳
A few more queries regarding puppy supplies-
1. As suggested I’m looking into getting
Is the size Medium a good one for a 4 month old puppy to start off with and grow into? Planning to use this in the car and when traveling. Is it safe for car ride?
2. We have a donut bed for her and planning to get another one. Any tried and tested ones please!
Is this any good or just overrated ?
3. Is this stainless steel bowl with a mat useful for the puppies?
4. What are the Must have grooming tools I must need for a puppy. We will mostly keep Cookie in a puppy cut. Actual names and links would be very helpful. ♥🙏
5. Please suggest a great puppy cam that we could set up near her expen, so we could keep an eye if we are out.

I’m so grateful for this forum and all the lovely people who take time to respectfully and patiently answer every query. You guys are the best! 💜
This is Cookie at 10 weeks ♥🐾 Isn’t she a beauty ♥🤗
 

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1. As suggested I’m looking into getting
Is the size Medium a good one for a 4 month old puppy to start off with and grow into? Planning to use this in the car and when traveling. Is it safe for car ride?
We use this model Sherpa for Ricky in the large size (black). We use it for airline travel for about 6 years now. Ricky is 15 pounds and it is a snug fit but it does do the job.

For auto travel, we use a "crash tested" harness (Kurgo) attached to a seatbelt. We think it is safer for auto travel than a Sherpa carrier. Ricky is comfortable in it, but most of the time he is bored.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
We use this model Sherpa for Ricky in the large size (black). We use it for airline travel for about 6 years now. Ricky is 15 pounds and it is a snug fit but it does do the job.

For auto travel, we use a "crash tested" harness (Kurgo) attached to a seatbelt. We think it is safer for auto travel than a Sherpa carrier. Ricky is comfortable in it, but most of the time he is bored.
Thank you DogFather.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

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Cookie is adorable! Re: grooming supplies, after years of using inexpensive brushes/combs on my grooming-averse older Hav, I finally invested in the Chris Christensen ones and they are fantastic. I use the 006 face and feet comb on the puppy (and to get eye boogers off my older dog) and the 000 buttercomb on my older dog. I use the tiny tot wooden pin brush as well (I got the small size to try it out before investing in the big one, and both dogs actually enjoy that one, even if the puppy wants to eat it 😊)
 

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Cookie is adorable! Re: grooming supplies, after years of using inexpensive brushes/combs on my grooming-averse older Hav, I finally invested in the Chris Christensen ones and they are fantastic. I use the 006 face and feet comb on the puppy (and to get eye boogers off my older dog) and the 000 buttercomb on my older dog. I use the tiny tot wooden pin brush as well (I got the small size to try it out before investing in the big one, and both dogs actually enjoy that one, even if the puppy wants to eat it 😊)
I try SO HARD to convince people to buy good tools the first time rather than thinking that cheaper ones will be “good enough” only to spend MORE money having to buy the good ones later!
 

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There are very few people who have bought CC combs after buying a different brand and didn’t love them and see an improvement. I think it’s because some of the other brands are able to price lower because the quality control isn’t as high. So there are people who do end up with a good version of another brand of comb, but a lot of people don’t, and there’s not really a way to know which one you’ll get. Often we aren’t the ones that can tell a difference, because if it’s decent quality is going to feel smooth to comb with but it’s not going to feel as comfortable, especially the shape of the tines. The difference also might not be as noticeable with a shorter, easy coat. I can still tell the difference when mine has a short coat, though. If I had to choose, i would rather have one good CC comb than a combination of other less expensive combs and brushes. Brushes are nice, but I could groom with a comb alone if I needed do, I couldn’t groom with only a brush.

The other nice thing about the CC combs is they last so much longer. I don’t know why but I think of kitchen whisks when I think of combs now! The spots they develop are cosmetic, I know it’s fine to cook with them, but it drives me crazy. I replaced my whisks with stainless steel over ten years ago, mainly because I was tired of replacing cheap ones and I had a gift card! They are still in perfect condition. I was surprised at how much better they actually feel to use. DH is the cook at our house, but even when I’m mixing up hot cocoa for my kids, it’s comfortable, works much better, and I throw them in the dishwasher. The difference with the combs is those little spots that develop do have a little micro texturing so it can cause more pulling so then they have to be replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Completely agree with all of you.
I would prefer the CC tools - even if pricy as they will be better for Cookie and last longer for us.
I’m looking at the 000 and the wooden brush ( size?)
Any other brushes I would need? I was reading about a slicker on another post.

I try SO HARD to convince people to buy good tools the first time rather than thinking that cheaper ones will be “good enough” only to spend MORE money having to buy the good ones later!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I love a good whisk too 😄♥
There are very few people who have bought CC combs after buying a different brand and didn’t love them and see an improvement. I think it’s because some of the other brands are able to price lower because the quality control isn’t as high. So there are people who do end up with a good version of another brand of comb, but a lot of people don’t, and there’s not really a way to know which one you’ll get. Often we aren’t the ones that can tell a difference, because if it’s decent quality is going to feel smooth to comb with but it’s not going to feel as comfortable, especially the shape of the tines. The difference also might not be as noticeable with a shorter, easy coat. I can still tell the difference when mine has a short coat, though. If I had to choose, i would rather have one good CC comb than a combination of other less expensive combs and brushes. Brushes are nice, but I could groom with a comb alone if I needed do, I couldn’t groom with only a brush.

The other nice thing about the CC combs is they last so much longer. I don’t know why but I think of kitchen whisks when I think of combs now! The spots they develop are cosmetic, I know it’s fine to cook with them, but it drives me crazy. I replaced my whisks with stainless steel over ten years ago, mainly because I was tired of replacing cheap ones and I had a gift card! They are still in perfect condition. I was surprised at how much better they actually feel to use. DH is the cook at our house, but even when I’m mixing up hot cocoa for my kids, it’s comfortable, works much better, and I throw them in the dishwasher. The difference with the combs is those little spots that develop do have a little micro texturing so it can cause more pulling so then they have to be replaced.
 

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Completely agree with all of you.
I would prefer the CC tools - even if pricy as they will be better for Cookie and last longer for us.
I’m looking at the 000 and the wooden brush ( size?)
Any other brushes I would need? I was reading about a slicker on another post.
I am a HUGE fan of the Ice Slip brush on mature coats, but you certainly wouldn’t use that during their first 9 months or so.

Also, a Dremel for nails, and a Resco clipper (the smallest one) for dew claws.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I am a HUGE fan of the Ice Slip brush on mature coats, but you certainly wouldn’t use that during their first 9 months or so.

Also, a Dremel for nails, and a Resco clipper (the smallest one) for dew claws.
Thank you Karen. For now I have decided on the
006 and 000. Then for 8 months + the 005 & ice slip brush. Any wooden or fusion brushed from CC you would suggest?
Sorry this is all new to me and hence the many questions 🙈
Is this the one
And could you link the dremel you would suggest.
Many many thanks 🙏
 

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We use this model Sherpa for Ricky in the large size (black). We use it for airline travel for about 6 years now. Ricky is 15 pounds and it is a snug fit but it does do the job.

For auto travel, we use a "crash tested" harness (Kurgo) attached to a seatbelt. We think it is safer for auto travel than a Sherpa carrier. Ricky is comfortable in it, but most of the time he is bored.
I think this is going to come down to personal preference. I, personally, think it's safer for them to travel in the sherpa than in a harness/ seatbelt - but neither is a bad choice. In the car Perry travels in a sherpa bag (I think the medium but not positive on that!) - he's 11 pounds and fits perfectly well. Lately he's been traveling in a crate instead of the sherpa because we've been going back and forth to the vet so much with his leg - and the larger crate is easier to put him in than the sherpa. I do think the sherpa is probably a bit safer, but the crate is safe enough. The added bonus of the crate (for us) is that he doesn't seem to get as car sick in it.

Thank you Karen. For now I have decided on the
006 and 000. Then for 8 months + the 005 & ice slip brush. Any wooden or fusion brushed from CC you would suggest?
Sorry this is all new to me and hence the many questions 🙈
Is this the one
And could you link the dremel you would suggest.
Many many thanks 🙏
If you're keeping her in a puppy cut, I would start with fewer tools and then get more if you feel you need them. With Perry in a puppy cut all I generally use is 006 butter comb and a pin brush (we have the oblong 20mm but any would be good I think). I use the brush more for a back "massage" than for actually needing to brush except when the puppy cut gets too long (like right now when he's about 18 weeks without getting cut) and use the 006 for his whole body. I don't even know if I would buy a brush if I were re-doing it, but it's nice to have around.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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Thank you Karen. For now I have decided on the
006 and 000. Then for 8 months + the 005 & ice slip brush. Any wooden or fusion brushed from CC you would suggest?
Sorry this is all new to me and hence the many questions 🙈
Is this the one
And could you link the dremel you would suggest.
Many many thanks 🙏
That’s not the right Resco clipper. Here it is:https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B0013LWGF2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

This is the Dremel I use. It’s pretty much the same as the all purpose Dremel, it just comes with fewer attachments: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B003TU0XG4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I would suggest that you also get a spare battery. The batteries last a relatively long time, but as they get older, the charge does start wearing down faster and I find it very annoying to get started on nails, just to have it stop on me in the middle.
 
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I think this is going to come down to personal preference. I, personally, think it's safer for them to travel in the sherpa than in a harness/ seatbelt - but neither is a bad choice. In the car Perry travels in a sherpa bag (I think the medium but not positive on that!) - he's 11 pounds and fits perfectly well. Lately he's been traveling in a crate instead of the sherpa because we've been going back and forth to the vet so much with his leg - and the larger crate is easier to put him in than the sherpa. I do think the sherpa is probably a bit safer, but the crate is safe enough. The added bonus of the crate (for us) is that he doesn't seem to get as car sick in it.
I agree with Melissa, if you watch a video of “safety testing” for car harnesses, the criteria they use is that the harness doesn’t break, and that the dog-dummy stays in the harness. If you watch the video CRITICALLY, there is no way that that the cervical spine of the animal could survive a crash intact. A properly fitted crate (meaning not too large, so that the dog is not thrown around inside it) annd made of materials that can withstand a crash safely. (And there are a number that do well at that these days) is a safer option.

Having had a friend die in an accident on the highway with is dogs, I am acutely aware of head to head restraint options in at least one crash. His larger dog was in a crate in the back, and survived with minor soft tissue injuries. His Papillon was in the back seat, which should be ones of the safest places in the car, in a safety approved car harness. The dog’s neck was broken in the crash. He survived the crash, but had to be euthanized at the vet’s office later in the afternoon.

Now, this was a VERY bad crash, and my friend did not survive either. But it was the icing on the cake of other (extens research I had done independently. Kodi USED to ride in a car harness, and I, too, thought I was doing my best to keep him safe. My dogs now ride in crates. In my case, because we deal in “quantities” of dogs, and they are in the car on a daily basis, the soft sided carriers are not the best option for US. But I think they are a GREAT option for people with a single dog who will be in the car on an occasional basis, and I think they are very safe Id properly strapped into the car’s seat belt system, in the back seat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thank you Melissa.
we are getting the sherpa in Medium for now as that’s what would work best for us with a puppy and children in my car.
And yes I think it’s best to start with a few CC products and then build on.
I think this is going to come down to personal preference. I, personally, think it's safer for them to travel in the sherpa than in a harness/ seatbelt - but neither is a bad choice. In the car Perry travels in a sherpa bag (I think the medium but not positive on that!) - he's 11 pounds and fits perfectly well. Lately he's been traveling in a crate instead of the sherpa because we've been going back and forth to the vet so much with his leg - and the larger crate is easier to put him in than the sherpa. I do think the sherpa is probably a bit safer, but the crate is safe enough. The added bonus of the crate (for us) is that he doesn't seem to get as car sick in it.



If you're keeping her in a puppy cut, I would start with fewer tools and then get more if you feel you need them. With Perry in a puppy cut all I generally use is 006 butter comb and a pin brush (we have the oblong 20mm but any would be good I think). I use the brush more for a back "massage" than for actually needing to brush except when the puppy cut gets too long (like right now when he's about 18 weeks without getting cut) and use the 006 for his whole body. I don't even know if I would buy a brush if I were re-doing it, but it's nice to have around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I agree with Melissa, if you watch a video of “safety testing” for car harnesses, the criteria they use is that the harness doesn’t break, and that the dog-dummy stays in the harness. If you watch the video CRITICALLY, there is no way that that the cervical spine of the animal could survive a crash intact. A properly fitted crate (meaning not too large, so that the dog is not thrown around inside it) annd made of materials that can withstand a crash safely. (And there are a number that do well at that these days) is a safer option.

Having had a friend die in an accident on the highway with is dogs, I am acutely aware of head to head restraint options in at least one crash. His larger dog was in a crate in the back, and survived with minor soft tissue injuries. His Papillon was in the back seat, which should be ones of the safest places in the car, in a safety approved car harness. The dog’s neck was broken in the crash. He survived the crash, but had to be euthanized at the vet’s office later in the afternoon.

Now, this was a VERY bad crash, and my friend did not survive either. But it was the icing on the cake of other (extens research I had done independently. Kodi USED to ride in a car harness, and I, too, thought I was doing my best to keep him safe. My dogs now ride in crates. In my case, because we deal in “quantities” of dogs, and they are in the car on a daily basis, the soft sided carriers are not the best option for US. But I think they are a GREAT option for people with a single dog who will be in the car on an occasional basis, and I think they are very safe Id properly strapped into the car’s seat belt system, in the back seat.
Thank
You Karen for the links.
I’m so sorry about your friend and his dog 😞
But like you said after extensive research we have decided the Sherpa would be the safest for Cookie.
 

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I agree with Melissa, if you watch a video of “safety testing” for car harnesses, the criteria they use is that the harness doesn’t break, and that the dog-dummy stays in the harness. If you watch the video CRITICALLY, there is no way that that the cervical spine of the animal could survive a crash intact. A properly fitted crate (meaning not too large, so that the dog is not thrown around inside it) annd made of materials that can withstand a crash safely. (And there are a number that do well at that these days) is a safer option.

Having had a friend die in an accident on the highway with is dogs, I am acutely aware of head to head restraint options in at least one crash. His larger dog was in a crate in the back, and survived with minor soft tissue injuries. His Papillon was in the back seat, which should be ones of the safest places in the car, in a safety approved car harness. The dog’s neck was broken in the crash. He survived the crash, but had to be euthanized at the vet’s office later in the afternoon.

Now, this was a VERY bad crash, and my friend did not survive either. But it was the icing on the cake of other (extens research I had done independently. Kodi USED to ride in a car harness, and I, too, thought I was doing my best to keep him safe. My dogs now ride in crates. In my case, because we deal in “quantities” of dogs, and they are in the car on a daily basis, the soft sided carriers are not the best option for US. But I think they are a GREAT option for people with a single dog who will be in the car on an occasional basis, and I think they are very safe Id properly strapped into the car’s seat belt system, in the back seat.
I do worry slightly about Perry being in the crate in the car instead of his sherpa bag - even with the crate hooked in with the seatbelt I don't think it's the safest. If, for some reason, we end up in the US long(er) term, I will probably look at some options for a safer crate that can just stay in the car (or hook into the back seat more securely, but for now I figure it's safe if not the safest option for us. I do like that he doesn't seem to get as car sick in it so may have to explore it more for that reason as well.
 
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