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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this topic has been covered in other post. So forgive me for asking again.

Due to his age and medical conditions, Boo’s vet took him off Trifexis, and recommended Sentinel Spectrum for heart worm/flea control. Boo has tolerated it without any problems. However, apparently, this product does not kill adult fleas, as the groomer found a few live fleas on him today (but no flea dirt).

Am unsure, where he picked up the fleas, as 95% of the time, he spends indoors or in his own backyard. We do have a large grassy yard but no real wildlife other than an occasional squirrel or possum.

Til the past year, Boo groomed every week. So fleas were never an issue. However, now, he can only tolerate a groom twice a month, So, I can’t rely on groomer to fix everything.


Is there a non toxic product that we can use, which will kill the adult fleas. I wash his bedding and clean his room frequently, and have never seen evidence of fleas. Boo is not scratching or irritating his skin.

Never had a flea problem in all these years. So this is new for me. Plus, I never learned much about grooming, even though I have all the tools, still in the boxes.

Any advice is much appreciated.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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Unfortunately, squirrels and possums can definitely carry them into your yard. :(

I would look into the Wondercide product line and see if there is something you could spray on his bedding, maybe?

The other thing you can DEFINITELY use is diatomaceous earth. Sprinkle that UNDER his beading. It will kill any fleas that walk through it. The dust is like tiny pieces of glass. You can also sprinkle it in your rugs, rub it in, wait half an hour or so, and vacuum it back out. Wear an N95 or KN95 mask when sprinkling it though. It is harmless on surfaces, but you don't want to be breathing it in. It can be very irritating to the lungs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Unfortunately, squirrels and possums can definitely carry them into your yard. :(

I would look into the Wondercide product line and see if there is something you could spray on his bedding, maybe?

The other thing you can DEFINITELY use is diatomaceous earth. Sprinkle that UNDER his beading. It will kill any fleas that walk through it. The dust is like tiny pieces of glass. You can also sprinkle it in your rugs, rub it in, wait half an hour or so, and vacuum it back out. Wear an N95 or KN95 mask when sprinkling it though. It is harmless on surfaces, but you don't want to be breathing it in. It can be very irritating to the lungs.
Thanks for suggestions. I ordered some of the indoor spray (Wondercide) for around his bedding.
 

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Owned by a Havallon
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I believe Wondercide also makes some lawn treatments so you could try that as well. This will get to the source of the problem before they get on him and into your house.

As long as you are seeing fleas, I would vacuum daily making sure you thoroughly vacuum every single spot where Boo lays. If he lays on the furniture, it is important to vacuum all the cushions, under them and all nooks and crannies. If his bedding cannot be vacuumed, I would wash it twice a week.

Boo’s hair is pretty short so you could run a fine face comb or flea comb through his fur daily. Focus around the tail area and behind the ears. Even if you don’t find fleas you are getting the eggs off. Most of the eggs will fall off around the house and that is why vacuuming is critical. You want to vacuum up the eggs before they hatch. A flea comb is a very underrated and effective tool. No need to panic over a few fleas. These simple things will avoid an infestation.
 

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Very good suggestions above. I would also mention that if you have other dogs visiting or around Boo at any time to make sure that they are treated or on preventative of some kind (flea free). Fleas can jump from one animal to another and they need a host. Or they can drop off an animal and the next one that comes along they jump onto. It only takes one flea to start the cycle. I haven't had a flea/tick problem in 20 years (knock on wood) and don't do any preventative except when I take my dogs to our beach cottage where ticks are a huge problem and also if I'm taking them to an event where other dogs are going to be which isn't often these days. If I have dog visitors come to my house (occasionally dog sit or have company that bring their pets), I ask that their pets be flea free before they come. I know these suggestions are just preventative measures. It sounds like you've caught the few fleas early so it shouldn't be too hard to get under control. Also as a side note, if you have a force dryer on hand you can blow it on his hair and it will give you an easy view down to the skin to check for fleas or flea dirt. The force of the air will part the hair for you. Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
IBD is a real disease, but it can only be definitively DX'd with an intestinal biopsy. Many dog owners are reluctant to do that if they can get the symptoms under control with medical management. Kodi is one of those dogs.

I also do not agree that probiotics do not help in the presence of antibiotics. If this were the case, humans would not be told to start taking probiotics when they need to take antibiotics to prevent diarrhea. (and it works) Obviously you DO want to avoid antibiotics as much as possible, and use the mildest antibiotics possible if you HAVE to use them, but sometimes they re necessary, depending on the dog and the situation.

In Kodi's case, his IBD is partially aggravated by also having a number of food intolerances, so we needed to sort those out. Which we did with the help of Hemopet Nutriscan (interpreted by or vet). But even removing those things from his diet (which also helped with a bunch of itching problems he was having, he was still having AWFUL problems with Clostridium overgrowth, which, although it is a normal gut bacteria, when it gets out of control, causes blow-out diarrhea, with a distinctive HORRIBLE smell, and terrible, painful gas, which left him lying prone across my lap, crying in pain all night long, over and over again. Once he HAD the overgrowth, only Metronidazole would clear it. But that is a really heavy duty drug, and really not one you want a dog on very often. So instead, we put him on a very low dose of Tylan (Tylosyn) powder. This has worked very well for him to prevent the Clostridium overgrowth, but every time we have tried tp take him off it, it has recurred.

He is on a limited ingredient diet, and over the years, we have had to change proteins as he has sensitized to one protein after another. (typical with these dogs) He is now on lamb, after having started on turkey, then moved to duck. (he cannot eat beef, dairy chicken or fish at all) He is 13 now, and I can get his commercial, canned, limited ingredient food in both rabbit and bison. So we are pretty sure we will be able to get through his remaining life before we run out of options.

Anyone with a dog with TRUE IBD will tell you that it is a life-long balancing act. It is not a "sensitive stomach", nor is it s a "food sensitivity, though those things may also be true. You will spend a lot of time learning to recognize symptoms, when to call the vet, and how to manage things on your own.

Every IBD dog will need to be managed differently, but this is how we manage Kodi:

Limited ingredient diet
Treats only from his allowed proteins (or fruits, veggies or Charlee Bears)
Tylan Powder daily
Pancrea Powder Daily
Soil Based probiotics daily (Mud Puppy Mama caught that one, when he started having break-through problems at one point... the probiotics we were using were whey (dairy) based!!! You need to be SOOOO careful!!!)

For years we used Pepcid (5mg) 2x daily as needed for nausea. Now, he is on it 2x daily every day.
We keep Cerenia on hand for if things get bad, but I do not give it without talking to the vet first, as it can interfere with vomiting when vomiting can be a GOOD thing!
Gabapentin (can't remember the dose) daily we started giving this to him when he hurt his shoulder. Now we believe it his helping him with gut pain. But he clearly does better with it.

NOW comes the part I feel worst about. I am quite convinced that I caused his problems by over-vaccinating him as a puppy. He was my first dog, and I THOUGHT I was doing the right thing by allowing my local vet to stick him with every vaccine made. It makes me want to cry now. I also own his half sister, and know many of his close relatives. He is the ONLY one I know of with these problems, but also the only one who was over-vaccinated. His sister has a stomach like cast iron.

I am sure that not every dog with IBD was over-vaccinated, but most of the ones that I know personally, when we all compare stories... we find out that most have that in common. So those of you with puppies reading this... PLEASE don't do it!!! By all means, vaccinate your puppies and keep them safe, but do not OVER vaccinate!
Good idea about dryer. I have a CC Kool dryer thats still in box. Maybe, I need to pull it out.
 

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Good idea about dryer. I have a CC Kool dryer thats still in box. Maybe, I need to pull it out.
I must admit that I'm a little jealous of your CC Kool dryer. That's a fine piece of equipment. You should definitely pull it out of the box! But in all seriousness, when using a force dryer, you can really see down to the skin and notice if there are any red spots, flea dirt, fleas etc.
 
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