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Owned by a Havallon
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That鈥檚 a really informative article thanks mudpuppymama馃槉. Especially useful in the last couple of paragraphs about joint supplements and chiropractic work being able to be used as a preventative measure in puppies!

Yes I was definitely jumping to conclusions because Perry was lucky enough to be rescued by Melissa but you鈥檙e right I don鈥檛 know his history.

But to any cruel breeders out there, I am wishing you the exact same treatment you give your animals. And of course I am wishing the nice breeders all the joy and love they give theirs馃槝
Trust me...the thought of a bad breeder can really get me going. I recall one sad story here where someone got a dog from a bad breeder and it had severe eye problems. She eventually had to have its eyes removed. Yikes. However, I also remind myself that an occasional bad thing can happen even with the best of breeders. For example, Stepsu鈥檚 dog has hip dysplasia. And blessings to all those like Melissa who take these less than perfect dogs under their wing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Maybe Perry was imagining that the blanket was his irresponsible breeder馃ぃ馃ぃ馃ぃ馃ぃ. Because that is what I would like to do to them right now on Perry鈥檚 behalf馃槨 either that or force them to have the same operations Perry is having to face馃が馃が. Sorry rant over (I think) it just breaks my heart that he is having to go through this because someone only cared about making money from him, rather than breeding him from healthy parents. I know with nature and health that nothing is guaranteed so I could be doing the breeder a disservice鈥ut I doubt it馃槧. Finishing on a nicer note lots of love to Perry that crate rest will be 2 months rather than 3. Xx
My understanding is that legs can grow in a twisted fashion if damage to the growth plates occurs before they have closed. This is why jumping from high places and other strenuous activities is discouraged when they are puppies until growth plates have closed. I am not trying to defend a bad breeder but this is another potential cause. Melissa rescued Perry and may not know his full history.

I think both things are possibly true. He definitely came from a puppy mill (reading between the lines that they were a "breeder that was going out of business" in West Virginia - though I think that the "going out of business" may have been a lie as well because I also came to suspect that the rescue I got him from is used as a way to get rid of pups that a puppy mill can't sell) - and given that both front legs are twisted I think it leans towards a genetic component. But it is also very possible that he had some damage to the leg/ growth plate before I got him at 8 months old, especially the left one that is so much more twisted. I first noticed the twist when I did his first grooming in Kampala at probably 10 months old and he was cut really short (a completely horrendous grooming job for sure!!) I was shocked by the twist.
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The left leg definitely became more bowed as he got older as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Thanks everyone for all the really nice things you've all said. He's doing well - definitely able to hobble around but still content to chill out in his crate. I decided to give him his pain meds first thing in the morning then wait a bit before taking him out - don't know if that worked or if he was in less pain this morning but he was ready to hobble around the yard to do his business (though I did pick him up to move him from his pee spot to his preferred pooping area :) ).

As much as you have all said that he's lucky to have gotten me, I feel incredibly fortunate to have the resources (and the foresight to get insurance :) ) to be able to do all of these things - not everyone is as lucky as I am to be able to cover these costs even if they wanted to.
 

Metrowest, MA
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Trust me...the thought of a bad breeder can really get me going. I recall one sad story here where someone got a dog from a bad breeder and it had severe eye problems. She eventually had to have its eyes removed. Yikes. However, I also remind myself that an occasional bad thing can happen even with the best of breeders. For example, Stepsu鈥檚 dog has hip dysplasia. And blessings to all those like Melissa who take these less than perfect dogs under their wing!
Just to bring you up to date, Stephu's dog does NOT have hip dysplasia. The X-rays were mis-read. The puppy had a soft tissue injury from too much leaping around. His hips are fine, and more than one vet has said that if sent to OFA, would probably be rated as "good". One problem with hip X-rays of small dogs is that if ANY excess pressure is put on the dog while it is being x-rayed, even because the pup is struggling a bit, or if the pup's spine is not aligned EXACTLY straight, you can MAKE a dog with perfectly good hips look really bad. And a vet who is not used to x-raying and evaluating hips on small dogs can draw the wrong conclusion.

I had a similar thing happen when Kodi was about 18 months old and was hospitalized because of a blockage caused by a "Greenie". (Never feed those... different story! LOL!). They did an "abdominal x-ray, and on a small dog, that's basically a "whole body x-ray". The ER vet cam back into the room and said, very casually to me, "I suppose you know that he has an enlarged heart?" WHAT?!?! Fortunately, I have a good friend who is a vet, and I sent the X-rays to her. She explained to me that most ER "vets" at the university hospital are interns, and have seen limited number of really small dogs. At the moment that the X-ray was taken, Kodi, who was probably yelling, had expelled all the air from his lungs, so his lungs were at their most deflated, making his heart look large in comparison. And the hearts of small dogs already ARE larger in comparison to the animal than those of larger dogs. There was absolutely NOTHING wrong with Kodi's heart, then or now. The staff cardiologist confirmed that the next day, but the ER doc took several years off my life that night!!!
 

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Just to bring you up to date, Stephu's dog does NOT have hip dysplasia. The X-rays were mis-read. The puppy had a soft tissue injury from too much leaping around. His hips are fine, and more than one vet has said that if sent to OFA, would probably be rated as "good". One problem with hip X-rays of small dogs is that if ANY excess pressure is put on the dog while it is being x-rayed, even because the pup is struggling a bit, or if the pup's spine is not aligned EXACTLY straight, you can MAKE a dog with perfectly good hips look really bad. And a vet who is not used to x-raying and evaluating hips on small dogs can draw the wrong conclusion.

I had a similar thing happen when Kodi was about 18 months old and was hospitalized because of a blockage caused by a "Greenie". (Never feed those... different story! LOL!). They did an "abdominal x-ray, and on a small dog, that's basically a "whole body x-ray". The ER vet cam back into the room and said, very casually to me, "I suppose you know that he has an enlarged heart?" WHAT?!?! Fortunately, I have a good friend who is a vet, and I sent the X-rays to her. She explained to me that most ER "vets" at the university hospital are interns, and have seen limited number of really small dogs. At the moment that the X-ray was taken, Kodi, who was probably yelling, had expelled all the air from his lungs, so his lungs were at their most deflated, making his heart look large in comparison. And the hearts of small dogs already ARE larger in comparison to the animal than those of larger dogs. There was absolutely NOTHING wrong with Kodi's heart, then or now. The staff cardiologist confirmed that the next day, but the ER doc took several years off my life that night!!!
Wow I am so glad to hear that Otto does not have hip dysplasia. I did not realize that. Anyway, I have the utmost respect for great reputable breeders, however I do believe something bad COULD occasionally happen and I am definitely not going to hold that against them. My nephew was born with an extremely rare birth defect. Sometimes things just happen.

I also think the fifteen or so years we provide care to our dogs is just as important as good genetics. However, great genetics definitely are a plus and there are limits to what can be overcome.
 

Metrowest, MA
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Wow I am so glad to hear that Otto does not have hip dysplasia. I did not realize that. Anyway, I have the utmost respect for great reputable breeders, however I do believe something bad COULD occasionally happen and I am definitely not going to hold that against them. My nephew was born with an extremely rare birth defect. Sometimes things just happen.

I also think the fifteen or so years we provide care to our dogs is just as important as good genetics. However, great genetics definitely are a plus and there are limits to what can be overcome.
Absolutely things can STILL go wrong any time you roll the genetc dice, no matter HOW careful a breeder is.
 
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