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· Metrowest, MA
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This is a great post but there are a few things I am surprised about. Now, my corgi, Foxy, absolutely loved tomatoes. We used to actually give her tomatoes as a treat. Am I mistaken about tomatoes?

Raw eggs? I thought raw eggs would be good as long as they were without the shell. Or is it the same concern with dogs as with humans about raw eggs (salmonella)?

I'm assuming that no corn on the cob because they may ingest the cob. Corn would be ok though, wouldn't it?

Now, I wouldn't think salt would be good, but I've seen homemade dog treat recipes that call for a small amount of salt (I omit it though).

Thanks, Dave, for this post.
Yes, many dogs can tolerate small amounts of tomato... Kodi LOVES the little grape tomatoes and gets one every time we have a salad. But too many is VERY acid and can cause problems for that reason.

I would guess the same as you on raw eggs... probably a salmonella issue. Both mine adore eggs... I scramble them in the microwave for them.

Yes, corn without the cob is OK, though it is a fairly allergenic food,so some dogs might not tolerate it well.

Small amounts of salt, or even a bit of ham or bacon now and then won't hurt your healthy dog, but dogs (and we!) don't need all that salt, so it's best to avoid too much.
 

· Dave T
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Discussion Starter · #62 · (Edited)
This is a great post but there are a few things I am surprised about. Now, my corgi, Foxy, absolutely loved tomatoes. We used to actually give her tomatoes as a treat. Am I mistaken about tomatoes?

Raw eggs? I thought raw eggs would be good as long as they were without the shell. Or is it the same concern with dogs as with humans about raw eggs (salmonella)?

I'm assuming that no corn on the cob because they may ingest the cob. Corn would be ok though, wouldn't it?

Now, I wouldn't think salt would be good, but I've seen homemade dog treat recipes that call for a small amount of salt (I omit it though).

Thanks, Dave, for this post.
yeah with some things on these sort of lists they try to list anything that has a remote chance of being toxic. An example of one item that gets listed is garlic yet it is in many dog foods. And garlic within limits can be beneficial to dogs as Jean and Diana mention http://petfooddiva.com/garlic-is-it-safe-for-your-pet/
I think the same can be argued for raw eggs.
 

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We have a large wisteria around our deck. I didn't know it was a problem until I sent a picture of Scout when he was a puppy to his breeder. Since then we have trimmed it so the furry ones can't reach it.
 

· Metrowest, MA
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What is a "sticky"? How does it work? Thanks from a newbie.
Stickies are threads that stay at the top of a section of the forum. Only moderators can make a thread a sticky.
 

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Havanese are no different than other dogs in terms of food toxicity.
Thank you. My wife Sue taught kindergarten and had students that were so deathly allergic to peanuts they would carry a pen-looking device with a drug in it for emergency treatment. All peanut products were banned from her classroom and no peanut butter was allowed in the cafeteria.

I understand that isn't poison, but to some people an allergy can be worse than a poison.

Thanks again, Jeff
 

· Metrowest, MA
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Thank you. My wife Sue taught kindergarten and had students that were so deathly allergic to peanuts they would carry a pen-looking device with a drug in it for emergency treatment. All peanut products were banned from her classroom and no peanut butter was allowed in the cafeteria.

I understand that isn't poison, but to some people an allergy can be worse than a poison.

Thanks again, Jeff
Oh, certainly! And dogs CAN have severe allergies to certain things. THOSE are COMPLETELY individual, as are allergies in people.
 

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When we had our corgi, we didn't know that grapes were a no no. We would share our grapes with her plus we had a grape arbor. Lots of grapes would fall on the ground and she happily grazed on them. She hate grapes to her heart's content. Never had a problem. Of course, once I learned that grapes were on the do not feed list, she never got any more. I've since heard that some dogs tolerate grapes. Fortunately for us and her, she must have been one of them.
 

· Metrowest, MA
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When we had our corgi, we didn't know that grapes were a no no. We would share our grapes with her plus we had a grape arbor. Lots of grapes would fall on the ground and she happily grazed on them. She hate grapes to her heart's content. Never had a problem. Of course, once I learned that grapes were on the do not feed list, she never got any more. I've since heard that some dogs tolerate grapes. Fortunately for us and her, she must have been one of them.
Probably more dogs tolerate them than don't. The problem is, you never know WHICH dogs will tolerate them, and even a dog that has tolerated them well in the past can suddenly get sick from them. They don't even know for sure WHAT about them makes dogs sick... a toxic chemical sprayed on them? Mildew? They aren't sure. And a Chihuahua can eat a whole bunch and not get sick, while a Great Dance can die from eating a handful. As a result, they feel that each case needs to be treated as an emergency.

The ODDS are that your dog will not get sick from eating grapes, but if your dog IS one who gets sick, they can be deadly.
 

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My wife gets intense migraines from anything with grapes in it - even if just a little juice in it. Same thing with artificial sweeteners. I don't know if she is allergic to any drugs. But she is allergic to certain fillers found in drugs. One drug that causes her a problem might be fine if she switches manufacturers or switches from generic to brand/label.

The only thing I know I am allergic to is sulfa drugs - I get hives. And allergies change over your life time. You tend to collect more. But when I was in my 20's, I was sensitive to oral penicillin. It gave me severe diarrhea. Now I tolerate it fine. Onions and certain spices will give me a stomach ache, but I don't consider than to be an allergy.

So it might not be a good idea to think, if our pup can eat it now, it will always be safe for him/her. And they may be allergic to a filler in a food, not the food itself.

I had a Yorkie who the vet said was allergic to fleas. It didn't seem they had to bite him. Just get on him. He took prednisone during the summer months.


Oh, I almost forgot, I am allergic to many eye drops for glaucoma. So instead of taking generic common drops for $10 a bottle, I take the ones that are almost $100 bottle. But just thankful there IS the expensive one that works. Oh, and beta blockers can set off a depression.

Fortunately, so far, nothing seems to bother Benjy. (Except being separated from us. Leaving him with the right busy treat and toys seems to take care of that.)
Jeff
 

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The list of plants is slightly worrying to me. There are so many in our garden which is open to Lenny, our puppy, to run around in. He already displayed a liking for plants. I can't possibly check all the time what he is eating. Should I take up all the plants?we have hydrangea, honeysuckle, rhododendron, lots of bamboo, daffodils that will come out in spring, etc. Our garden would be half bare.
I can corner off some but not all.
 

· Metrowest, MA
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I just watched my guys when they were puppies. I saw that they usually totally avoided the dangerous ones. If not, I would have had to do some serious thinking on how to manage their safety. I am an avid gardener, and would not have been happy with a grass-only yard, so I probably would have fenced off a section with no plants for them. Fortunately, they leave the plants alone! (And they are never outdoors unsupervised anyway)
 

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Our backyard has a lot of plants on the bad list. We have lots of hydrangeas, camellias, azaleas and wisteria that have been there for years. Scout and Truffles have never been interested in any plant or flower. They are only allowed on the deck without supervision. Recently a coworkers beagle died after eating a mushroom in her backyard. Now I check the grass because frequently there are little mushrooms growing.
 

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I have some professional experience with plants and landscaping. We recently remodeled our fenced backyard with new drought tolerant landscaping. In general, I kept in mind the list of plants that are commonly thought to be toxic to dogs. The list serves as a good guideline for plants to avoid. But not all dogs react to those plants the same way. So much depends on their size, metabolism, physiology, genetics, amount ingested, type of plant, etc. Consequently, I used some plants from the list that I could justify as presenting only a minor risk.

Yes, I would urge you to take precautions against plants that may be toxic to your dog, however do not panic if your dog should ingest a small amount of something that is on the list. A trip to the Vet is justified if your dog should show any adverse change in behavior over the next couple of days.

There are even some plants that may be toxic to your dog that are not on the common lists. Most of these plants could cause stomach and intestinal upset if eaten in sufficient quantity, but certain death is not necessarily the common conclusion. We experiment with a lot of uncommon, exotic plants as a hobby and we have no idea about their toxicity to dogs. Therefore, we always supervise Ricky when he is outdoors in his yard. Yes, he does like to sniff plants, lick them, and sometimes chew a bit on them. We just distract him with some interaction rather than scolding him. We worry more about Ricky eating granular fertilizer or pesticides than eating the plants themselves. Snail bait pellets are one of the worst. We really don't like Ricky exploring other peoples yards because we have no idea what they have been using in their garden and often times they don't even know because they use an outside gardening service. When we use fertilizers we generally use fertilizer spikes driven way below ground level. If we find a plant that is prone to insects and requires pesticides, we just pull it out and plant something else.

Ricky really likes a lawn type ground cover! He rolls in it, buries his nose in it and breathes in deeply, licks it, chews on it, and is his "go to" place for potty and poop. It is his form of "catnip." In our remodel, we wanted Ricky to have his own safe "lawn." After much research, we planted Dutch White Clover from seed (Trifolium repens) for Ricky. It is more of a low growing ground cover about 6" high. It is relatively drought tolerant, requires little maintenance, no fertilizing because it "fixes" Nitrogen in the soil, is non-toxic, stands up to foot and paw traffic, and does not turn yellow from dog urine. The drawbacks are that it may attract bees when blooming and it is an aggressive grower so it needs to be contained within curbs or header boards.

Ricky likes being wherever his favorite people are, whether indoors or outdoors. He only wants to be outdoors when we are outdoors. Now Ricky has a safe yard where we can play with him and keep him out of trouble. We are confident that, with vigilance, no plants in our yard will harm him.

Ricky's Popi
 

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Flea / tick prevention

Has anyone used Nexgard of Bravecto with their Havanese? I'd love some feedback on how the breed tends to tolerate those oral, chewable flea and tick preventative meds. We live in CT where ticks are a concern so we want to have a plan in place before getting a Havanese pup:).
 

· Metrowest, MA
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Has anyone used Nexgard of Bravecto with their Havanese? I'd love some feedback on how the breed tends to tolerate those oral, chewable flea and tick preventative meds. We live in CT where ticks are a concern so we want to have a plan in place before getting a Havanese pup:).
I would;t use a feed-through on mine. I use Advantix II when I really have to for ticks. (like right now) but they usually don't get more than 3 doses a year. I usr interceptor for heart worm, ever six weeks, and only from June through Nov.
 
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