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I am also really picky about rugs and chemicals... Have you tried putting your Hook and Loom rug in the washing machine? How did it do?
I have not put them in the washer yet. One of them is too big for my washer. It is 10x12. The others should fit in there but they are fairly new and I have just been vacuuming them so far. I love the Hook and Loom Company’s transparency about their rugs and chemicals. They are working well at our entrances to trap dirt and the dirt vacuums out easily.
 

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Some of them you're just not going to stop. Nike was jumping on, and off furniture when she was 12 weeks old. She was jumping sideways over her littermates when she was 6 weeks old.

Birdy is named that because she spends a high percentage of her time airborne. Gates are not even an inconvenience to her.

Ruby jumped over a 2' gate, both ways, when she had puppies. She came and went as she saw fit. All the others we've had to let them in and out. One of her Daughters is named Spring, not for the season, but for the spring in her legs.

None of them have ever had an injury. All our floors are wood, or smooth.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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Some of them you're just not going to stop. Nike was jumping on, and off furniture when she was 12 weeks old. She was jumping sideways over her littermates when she was 6 weeks old.

Birdy is named that because she spends a high percentage of her time airborne. Gates are not even an inconvenience to her.

Ruby jumped over a 2' gate, both ways, when she had puppies. She came and went as she saw fit. All the others we've had to let them in and out. One of her Daughters is named Spring, not for the season, but for the spring in her legs.

None of them have ever had an injury. All our floors are wood, or smooth.
Yes, there are those... Robin is one. She has been "flying" in and out of Elinor's puppy pen. ;) Fortunately, Nora has just about given up on mothering, other than quick check-ins, and is perfectly happy letting "Auntie Robin" entertain the kids! LOL!

Ducky is close behind, though OUR gates are 30" and he can't fly those. He spends ALL too much time on my desk, however, and typing on my keyboard! Elinor and I have talked about a possible future match between Robin and Ducky, but then we think... between those brains and those springs... will we need to put lead shoes on them to keep them on earth? :ROFLMAO:
 

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Yes, there are those... Robin is one. She has been "flying" in and out of Elinor's puppy pen. ;) Fortunately, Nora has just about given up on mothering, other than quick check-ins, and is perfectly happy letting "Auntie Robin" entertain the kids! LOL!

Ducky is close behind, though OUR gates are 30" and he can't fly those. He spends ALL too much time on my desk, however, and typing on my keyboard! Elinor and I have talked about a possible future match between Robin and Ducky, but then we think... between those brains and those springs... will we need to put lead shoes on them to keep them on earth? :ROFLMAO:
 

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I bought some pet stairs for our sofa but Hugo rarely uses them and jumps on and off the sofa at different ends-a waste of money unless I can train him to use them but that is difficult. We have also put gym mats around our bed. It spoils the decor of our room but it does work because if Hugo jumps off he has a softer landing. However I try to carry him before he jumps off the bed but at least the gym mats are there if I cannot do so in time. I would hate it if he couldn’t be on our bed at all because of this. His loves to sit on our bed when I get ready in the mornings and some nights we allow him to sleep on top of the bed. Perhaps I should be thinking twice about this but I love it when he cuddles up to me on the sofa and bed . I suffer with fibromyalgia and I have to rest a lot. One of the reasons I got Hugo is because I suffer with chronic pain and I heard that dogs were good for people who suffer pain. Through my own experience this is definitely correct.
 

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I bought some pet stairs for our sofa but Hugo rarely uses them and jumps on and off the sofa at different ends-a waste of money unless I can train him to use them but that is difficult. We have also put gym mats around our bed. It spoils the decor of our room but it does work because if Hugo jumps off he has a softer landing. However I try to carry him before he jumps off the bed but at least the gym mats are there if I cannot do so in time. I would hate it if he couldn’t be on our bed at all because of this. His loves to sit on our bed when I get ready in the mornings and some nights we allow him to sleep on top of the bed. Perhaps I should be thinking twice about this but I love it when he cuddles up to me on the sofa and bed . I suffer with fibromyalgia and I have to rest a lot. One of the reasons I got Hugo is because I suffer with chronic pain and I heard that dogs were good for people who suffer pain. Through my own experience this is definitely correct.
It is absolutely possible to teach a dog not to jump down, but it takes 100% commitment and attention. Sort of like potty training. Most people don’t have the will to stick to it, because it is not as important to them as potty training! when Kodi injured his shoulder, and it became absolutely essential that he NEVER jump off the bed, we started keeping him on a leash EVERY TIME he was on the bed. It took a year, but he no longer even tries. He ALWAYS waits to be lifted down, even if he doesn’t have a leash on. But few people are willing to leash a dog EVERY time they are on the bed for that length of time unless they are dealing with an injury…
 
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... But few people are willing to leash a dog EVERY time they are on the bed for that length of time unless they are dealing with an injury…
Sometimes it's not willingness but being able to do it :) I know that for us it would be almost impossible - the last year has been an anomaly with me being home/ with Perry every day - but normally I would be at work during the day and travel for work at times, and during that time preventing jumping would mean keeping him crated (or in an expen if I could trust him not to try to jump out of it!) because it is unrealistic to expect my housekeeper (at the time in Uganda) to monitor him that closely (because it's jumping on/ off furniture too). Even when he is leashed with me he will still try to jump on/ off things (when he had his CCL surgery while still leashed with about 3 feet of leash he tried to jump onto the couch! and when he's on the bed with me, I have to keep the leash super short because he still wants to jump with it on :) )
 

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Metrowest, MA
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Sometimes it's not willingness but being able to do it :) I know that for us it would be almost impossible - the last year has been an anomaly with me being home/ with Perry every day - but normally I would be at work during the day and travel for work at times, and during that time preventing jumping would mean keeping him crated (or in an expen if I could trust him not to try to jump out of it!) because it is unrealistic to expect my housekeeper (at the time in Uganda) to monitor him that closely (because it's jumping on/ off furniture too). Even when he is leashed with me he will still try to jump on/ off things (when he had his CCL surgery while still leashed with about 3 feet of leash he tried to jump onto the couch! and when he's on the bed with me, I have to keep the leash super short because he still wants to jump with it on :) )
Oh, absolutely. But my point was that they CAN be taught not to do it, with enough time and effort applied. Luckily, in our case, the bed was the only problem piece of furniture, because he doesn’t have access to anything else he WANTS to jump up on when we are not supervising him. And he he can’t get on the bed without help, because it is so high. So we really did control the trainging environment!
 
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Oh, absolutely. But my point was that they CAN be taught not to do it, with enough time and effort applied. Luckily, in our case, the bed was the only problem piece of furniture, because he doesn’t have access to anything else he WANTS to jump up on when we are not supervising him. And he he can’t get on the bed without help, because it is so high. So we really did control the trainging environment!
They absolutely can - and for people with "normal" lives (and a dog who doesn't think he's part kangaroo) it is probably a lot easier (though still not easy) than it is for us. I do agree with Tom - some of them are just jumpers at heart - and I have one of them, wonky legs and all :).

Perry is in so many different environments... for example, when we're in many hotels the beds are too high for him to jump on - but because he wants to, he still thinks he can, so I have to keep him tightly tethered when we're there - and you're right it is completely possible, but it does take a lot of energy - you have to be extremely vigilant every minute which can be very tiring. And I will completely admit that I don't have the energy for it for him and our life (in addition to knowing that it would seriously lower his quality of life - very specific to Perry and our lifestyle.)
 

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They absolutely can - and for people with "normal" lives (and a dog who doesn't think he's part kangaroo) it is probably a lot easier (though still not easy) than it is for us. I do agree with Tom - some of them are just jumpers at heart - and I have one of them, wonky legs and all :).

Perry is in so many different environments... for example, when we're in many hotels the beds are too high for him to jump on - but because he wants to, he still thinks he can, so I have to keep him tightly tethered when we're there - and you're right it is completely possible, but it does take a lot of energy - you have to be extremely vigilant every minute which can be very tiring. And I will completely admit that I don't have the energy for it for him and our life (in addition to knowing that it would seriously lower his quality of life - very specific to Perry and our lifestyle.)
AND... In our case, we were working with an "older" dog, not a youngster. That makes a HUGE difference too... AND, for the first several months, there were HUGE "natural consequences" to him disobeying... he would land yelping and on 3 legs. So there was IMMEDIATE feed-back...

He STILL won't go down the steps to the back yard, and he COULD do that safely and without worry of injury... He can and does do steps of exactly the same length out the front of the house with no problem. But we finally installed his ramp, because he is so worried about getting hurt that he just won't go down those steps. I think, in Perry's case, he was able to keep that leg off the ground and avoid pain. Even MOVING cause Kodi pain, because it was in his shoulder.
 
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How do you leash the dog on the bed. Do you tie the end of leash to a part of the bed?
I keep the loop around my wrist. That way, if they start to go AWOL, I wake up and deal with it! LOL! I was VERY determined that he wasn't going to hurt himself, and at the same time, it would have broken my heart not to let my sweet old man up on the bed with us at his age! With a puppy, I probably would have just made the bed and off-limits place, and he never would have known the difference!

BTW, when Ducky got to "marking age" I started using the leash for the OPPOSITE reason... He would NEVER mark on the bed, but I didn't trust him not to mark elsewhere in our large bedroom, with a very large, very expensive antique oriental rug that was handed down fro a great aunt. The last time it was cleaned, CLEANING cost $800, and it is something we DON'T want to do because of "puppy accidents"! So Ducky is not allowed on the floor in the bedroom without "eyes on" supervision right now, and that is not something I can do while sleeping. So if he is allowed on the bed while we sleep in in the morning, he is on a leash! LOL!
 
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They absolutely can - and for people with "normal" lives (and a dog who doesn't think he's part kangaroo) it is probably a lot easier (though still not easy) than it is for us. I do agree with Tom - some of them are just jumpers at heart - and I have one of them, wonky legs and all :).

Perry is in so many different environments... for example, when we're in many hotels the beds are too high for him to jump on - but because he wants to, he still thinks he can, so I have to keep him tightly tethered when we're there - and you're right it is completely possible, but it does take a lot of energy - you have to be extremely vigilant every minute which can be very tiring. And I will completely admit that I don't have the energy for it for him and our life (in addition to knowing that it would seriously lower his quality of life - very specific to Perry and our lifestyle.)
I think traveling and being in many different environments, along with having an avid jumper, would make an anti-jumping regimen extremely challenging. A big part of it is setting up an anti-jumping environment which would be extremely difficult while traveling.
 

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How do you leash the dog on the bed. Do you tie the end of leash to a part of the bed?
Perry's not on the bed when we're sleeping, so when he's on movement restriction and is on the bed with me, I'm awake and monitoring him. I keep him leashed with the leash either on my wrist and/or wrapped around my foot (so I can keep it short) to control him.
 
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