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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have lived a number of years in Denmark and there, desexing (as it’s translated to in English) is not as prevalent as it is in this country. The country does not have a big unwanted dog population and it really is a personal decision even for owners who aren’t going to breed. Many owners simply choose not to especially for their boy pups.

Thoughts? I am not breeding mine. So I would not choose to not fix him for that reason. It does alter their personalities and behavior. For good and bad. Thoughts?
 

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Metrowest, MA
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I have lived a number of years in Denmark and there, desexing (as it’s translated to in English) is not as prevalent as it is in this country. The country does not have a big unwanted dog population and it really is a personal decision even for owners who aren’t going to breed. Many owners simply choose not to especially for their boy pups.

Thoughts? I am not breeding mine. So I would not choose to not fix him for that reason. It does alter their personalities and behavior. For good and bad. Thoughts?
I think it is beming MORE acceptable in this country to make that decision, though you will still have others, even vets, who question your decision. If you are a responsible owner, who can and will make sure that your pet does not produce irresponsibly, and if you are willing to do the work to teach your young male dog that marking is not acceptable inside ANY building or on ANY person, (and it feels like you are starting all over again, JUST when you get done potty training them, because, in their mind, it really IS a completely different thing, even though both use urine) there is absolutely NO reason that you should feel pressured by society that you HAVE to desex your dog. My Panda is 6, and will be spayed this year, finally, ONLY because I don not want to have to deal with both her and her young, stud puppy son in the same house when she next comes into heat, and I do not intend to breed her again, so there is no good reason that she HAS to remain intact.

I have no intention of neutering my young male. Part of that is that he is a show dog for now and I hope to eventually use him as a stud. But part of it also is that I do not believe in juvenile spay/neuter, and I have no good reason, at this time, to desex him. OTOH, I GUARANTEE you that he will NEVER be allowed to produce an "accidental" litter. ;)
 

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Ricky Ricardo "Super Moderator"
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I have lived a number of years in Denmark and there, desexing (as it’s translated to in English) is not as prevalent as it is in this country. The country does not have a big unwanted dog population and it really is a personal decision even for owners who aren’t going to breed. Many owners simply choose not to especially for their boy pups.

Thoughts? I am not breeding mine. So I would not choose to not fix him for that reason. It does alter their personalities and behavior. For good and bad. Thoughts?
I found that neutering Ricky did not alter his personality, but certainly it can vary from dog to dog. Ricky is still everyone's favorite dog who meets him. I do not trust myself to make sure he would not impregnate a female...I'm just basically lazy. And besides now that he is neutered, I will sometimes look the other direction when he and a female are attracted to each other. It just depends on the situation. It was NOT acceptable to me when he started humping a Havanese female in front of a large crowd at the San Diego Meet the Breed show a couple of months ago. It was so embarrassing to me but Ricky was getting cheers!!!

So, I am in the camp of believing non-breeding males should be neutered.
 

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I have owned 5 male dogs in my adult life. 4 were neutered between 6-10 months. All 4 had wonderful little personalities. I can't imagine that they could have been better. They were active, friendly little dogs. No marking, no humping, no dominance.
The other dog was neutered at 2 years when I bought him from a family who didn't want him in their house. He was a Bichon Frise. He was overweight, lazy, tried to fight every other dog, marked wherever he felt like it, indoors, outdoors, on walls, shoes, furniture. He could also be very nasty. I think that he was abused by the family. He hated my other male Bichon. His upbringing was questionable. I had him neutered and eventually my parents begged me to let them have him for their own. He was a good pet for my parent's slower lifestyle. Being the only dog in the house was a better fit.
I will continue to have my male dogs neutered since I will never be a breeder and I need the option to board them. I have never seen any downside to neutering.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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I found that neutering Ricky did not alter his personality, but certainly it can vary from dog to dog. Ricky is still everyone's favorite dog who meets him. I do not trust myself to make sure he would not impregnate a female...I'm just basically lazy. And besides now that he is neutered, I will sometimes look the other direction when he and a female are attracted to each other. It just depends on the situation. It was NOT acceptable to me when he started humping a Havanese female in front of a large crowd at the San Diego Meet the Breed show a couple of months ago. It was so embarrassing to me but Ricky was getting cheers!!!

So, I am in the camp of believing non-breeding males should be neutered.
well, the fact that his personality did not change was because he was altered as an immature dog. That is to be expected. :) It would be very unusual to see much, if any personality change. Even in an adult dog, “personality change” will be EXTREMELY minimal. SOME behaviors may change. With males, they will be less prone to roaming and male/male aggression. (Since Havanese don’t tend to have a lot of THAT anyway, we don’t tend to see A big change there, though it CAN happen) with females, of course, you don’t have to deal with heat behaviors, or worse, in Pixel’s case, her false pregnancy. Going theough that with her ONCE, and being told that she was likely to do it on RVERY heat if not bred… well… THAT was a non-starter! Neither she NOR we had ANY fun with THAT!!! LOL!

And, as you’ve found, while neutering SOMETIMES curtails humping, (it largely did with Kodi until Ducky got big enough to play with! LOL) it doesn’t always. Some dogs, male AND female, just hump. Desexed or not!

The funny thing is that in the sports world, MANY people leave their dogs of both sexes intact, but it is the FEMALES who are ostracized… THEY are not allowed to trial when in heat, and many training centers will not allow females in heat in class, “Because they might distract the males!” LOL! What’s fair about that?
 

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Believe me, folks, I am NOT trying to talk people out of spay/neuter. I think for the VAST majority of pet owners, it is the right thing to do. It makes life MUCH easier, and as long as you wait for the dog to mature physically, there are no real down-sides to it In most cases. What I DON’T like is for people to think that they MUST desex their dogs or they are being negligent in some way. AS LONG AS they are SURE they are willing to take on the responsibility of an intact animal, there is nothing harmful to the animal in keeping it intact.

Tere talked about an intact Bichon she took in who had all sorts of problems… but then goes on to say that he was overweigh, his “up-bringing was questionable” and that he had all sorts of behavioral problems that had absolutely NOTHING to do with his status as an intact male, only that he had never been properly trained. THAT is a dog in the hands of the WRONG kind of people… intact or not. My guess is that he wouldn’t have been a much nicer dog (with the possible exception of his aggression toward other dogs) even if he’d been neutered before she got him. He MOSTLY needed someone to TRAIN him how to BEHAVE!

Spaying and neutering does not, in itself, make dogs into good pets. GOOD TRAINING does that. Spaying and neutering keeps them from reproducing when people aren’t careful enough. It also, in the case of girls, does away with some inconvenient messiness, and with boys it does get their minds out from between their back legs to a great extent. ;)
 

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Just gonna throw this out. Contrary to current wisdom, Boo was neutered in 2003 at the age of five months. I can’t say that it affected his personality or health, given his current age.

I know there is tremendous controversy about when or whether to neuter/spay. I don’t really have a firm opinion myself for responsible pet owners. However, for the many irresponsible “pet owners,” not on this forum, I feel spaying/neutering is the best option. Otherwise, there are just more unwanted and uncared for pets, which is a real tragedy.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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Just gonna throw this out. Contrary to current wisdom, Boo was neutered in 2003 at the age of five months. I can’t say that it affected his personality or health, given his current age.

I know there is tremendous controversy about when or whether to neuter/spay. I don’t really have a firm opinion myself for responsible pet owners. However, for the many irresponsible “pet owners,” not on this forum, I feel spaying/neutering is the best option. Otherwise, there are just more unwanted and uncared for pets, which is a real tragedy.
Absolutely! There is a good reason that most rescues won’t let a dog leave without being spayed or neutered. If a dog gets INTO that system, someone hasn’t been doing their job…
 
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Absolutely! There is a good reason that most rescues won’t let a dog leave without being spayed or neutered. If a dog gets INTO that system, someone hasn’t been doing their job…
So true. I used to volunteer with a rescue group. It really opened my eyes to the selfishness of so many people, who treated their pet as a disposable commodity instead of a living/breathing creature.

I’m just waiting for the ball to drop now, since there were so many pets adopted, during the initial covid crisis. Hopefully, the system is not overwhelmed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have lived a number of years in Denmark and there, desexing (as it’s translated to in English) is not as prevalent as it is in this country. The country does not have a big unwanted dog population and it really is a personal decision even for owners who aren’t going to breed. Many owners simply choose not to especially for their boy pups.

Thoughts? I am not breeding mine. So I would not choose to not fix him for that reason. It does alter their personalities and behavior. For good and bad. Thoughts?
Thank you all for your in
I have lived a number of years in Denmark and there, desexing (as it’s translated to in English) is not as prevalent as it is in this country. The country does not have a big unwanted dog population and it really is a personal decision even for owners who aren’t going to breed. Many owners simply choose not to especially for their boy pups.

Thoughts? I am not breeding mine. So I would not choose to not fix him for that reason. It does alter their personalities and behavior. For good and bad. Thoughts?
Thank you all for your insights on this (apparently) not so odd question!
 

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I don't remember what thread we were discussing this on a week or two ago, but if you can find it (or if someone else can remember) I think there were also some good posts there.

I agree with Karen on the responsible owner - if you DON'T want to neuter you can do it if you are willing to take the time and effort to deal with it - but that doesn't just mean training, it also means probably not using daycare, being sure you absolutely trust your pet sitter/ dog walker to prevent any accidents happen from "meeting" other dogs, being hyper vigilant at a dog park, etc. While I agree that waiting til they're over a year is worth all of that work, for the average pet owner, I'm not sure there are other major benefits of keeping them intact longer that would outweigh all of that (and definitely wouldn't for me). I also think that for some responsible owners, spaying/ neutering is the most responsible thing they can do.

I am definitely in the "if you're not planning to use them for showing / breeding they should be spayed/ neutered" camp) - though not as early as most vets recommend and rescues recommend (keeping in mind that they both see an obscene amount of pregnancy "accidents" and the unwanted pups from that so they're erring on the side of public good rather than individual dogs).
 

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Metrowest, MA
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I don't remember what thread we were discussing this on a week or two ago, but if you can find it (or if someone else can remember) I think there were also some good posts there.

I agree with Karen on the responsible owner - if you DON'T want to neuter you can do it if you are willing to take the time and effort to deal with it - but that doesn't just mean training, it also means probably not using daycare, being sure you absolutely trust your pet sitter/ dog walker to prevent any accidents happen from "meeting" other dogs, being hyper vigilant at a dog park, etc. While I agree that waiting til they're over a year is worth all of that work, for the average pet owner, I'm not sure there are other major benefits of keeping them intact longer that would outweigh all of that (and definitely wouldn't for me). I also think that for some responsible owners, spaying/ neutering is the most responsible thing they can do.

I am definitely in the "if you're not planning to use them for showing / breeding they should be spayed/ neutered" camp) - though not as early as most vets recommend and rescues recommend (keeping in mind that they both see an obscene amount of pregnancy "accidents" and the unwanted pups from that so they're erring on the side of public good rather than individual dogs).
I think I am mostly in this camp… especially with the boys, where the annoyances of dealing with their sexuality is constant, rather than a couple of times a year. But I MOSTLY think that it needs to be an individual decision, without the HUGE amount of societal pressure and judgmentalism we see put on it (sometimes in BOTH directions!) these days!
 
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I agree with you, that it should be a personal decision. I do think generally that spaying and neutering is probably the best option for most dogs here, because we haven’t established a common precedent among average pet owners on how to supervise and manage them if they aren’t. But that isn’t because it’s really hard to do, or an individual can’t make a different choice and it would be irresponsible. I just don’t think we’re there as a society, and there’s already so much intentionally casual breeding. I hope we’ll get there in the future. Timing to neuter or spay can be complicated, and there are vets stuck in the old way of doing it early, but that’s changing.

The idea that a pet dog that spends most of his time indoors and is only supervised on a leash outside must to be neutered to prevent a neighborhood of stray puppies is pretty silly in principle. But the family of a pet dog that spends a lot of time at daycare, or a large breed dog that spends part of the workday unsupervised in a backyard, would have different issues to consider. I know that neutering was the best decision for my Havanese, but not because he escapes our house and wanders the neighborhood! I wish I could have waited a while longer to do it. The guidelines of daycare had more influence than maybe it should have, but there were other reasons to do it then. Our breeder made recommendations but the contract was more flexible than most.
 

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I don't remember what thread we were discussing this on a week or two ago, but if you can find it (or if someone else can remember) I think there were also some good posts there.
I was thinking about that one too, Melissa. It's the post titled 'New fur baby mom"

The funny thing is that in the sports world, MANY people leave their dogs of both sexes intact, but it is the FEMALES who are ostracized… THEY are not allowed to trial when in heat, and many training centers will not allow females in heat in class, “Because they might distract the males!” LOL! What’s fair about that?
Drives me crazy, just blame it on the female.
 
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