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Linda
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just did titers on Dexter for Distemper/Parvo. Parvo was good, but Distemper was low. The Vet reommends a booster, but booster only comes in a combo vaccine, so.... Dexter would get a Parvo vaccine too. What would you do?
 

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"Importantly, any measurable titer to a vaccine including distemper & parvovirus means that the dog has specific committed immune memory cells to respond and afford protection upon exposure. It really doesn’t matter how high the titer result is as long as it measures something. If your dogs consistently have no measurable titer to canine distemper virus, it means mean that they are distemper “non-or low-responders”, an heritable trait where they will never mount immunity to distemper and will always be susceptible. These dogs should not be used for breeding."
This is from Dr. Jean Dodd's FAQ about Titers and vaccine protocol.
 

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Dave T
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Linda
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks! Question Answered.

Thanks everyone! That was what I was thinking. I read about the memories cells prior to posting and it makes a lot of sense.

I also read that a rising distemper titer just means the immune system is attempting to kill off the invader to the system. :whoo:
 

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I'm planning on doing titers for the first time this year but now I'm confused. I thought if the titer was low, a shot was given. If the dog can still be immune even with low titer levels, then why get the test in the first place and spend the money? At what point do you give another shot?

Bella had shots every year until she was 4. She will turn 7 in July and so I thought I'd check on titer levels. But now I'm confused which means I won't be able to give a clear argument to my vet--who believes in yearly shots.
 

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Metrowest, MA
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I'm planning on doing titers for the first time this year but now I'm confused. I thought if the titer was low, a shot was given. If the dog can still be immune even with low titer levels, then why get the test in the first place and spend the money? At what point do you give another shot?

Bella had shots every year until she was 4. She will turn 7 in July and so I thought I'd check on titer levels. But now I'm confused which means I won't be able to give a clear argument to my vet--who believes in yearly shots.
Unfortunately, there are no clear answers. It is possible to have a completely negative titer and still have he "memory cells" that will mount a response if the dog is exposed to the disease. the problem is, we just don't know. Because of this, my vet (who is a holistic vet and is NOT in favor of willy-nilly vaccination) suggests titers every 3 years. If a titer for distemper or parvo comes back negative, she recommends revaccinating… just against these two diseases. The reason being that both diseases are still around (and there will be more if people don't keep their pets vaccinated) and Parvo is usually deadly for puppies and elderly dogs, and will make even healthy adults very, very sick. Distemper is almost always deadly, at any age.

Around here most vets who deal with people who are not interested in titers recommend re-vaccination for Parvo and Distemper every 3 years, just to hedge their bets. Very few are still doing it annually.
 

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going through this with my lab. We have to get the titers for boarding. Off and on he his titers come back low for parvo. He will be ten this year and hasnt had distemper since maybe when he was a year old, I will have to look it up, but his distemper always comes back fine. With the parvo he came back low in 2010 and we had a single shot given and his tests were fine until just this year. He is low again but I am not giving him a shot as we have to give distemper also now. My holistic vet says it is rare for adult dog to get parvo and not to bother because she doesnt think the low titer is an issue for him. The conventional vet says to vaccinate and that he can get parvo as adult. The dog boarding place has rejected him due to this even though he has gone there since he was a puppy, so now we are getting a pet sitter.
 

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Dave T
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I myself would not revaccinate unless there was a negative reading, and I have never heard of it. I believe that when they say these vaccinations once positive are good for life. I don't even titer JMO
 

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Dave T
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Dr. Schultz summarizes his 40 years of research with the following:

“Only one dose of the modified-live canine ‘core’ vaccine (against CDV, CAV-2 and CPV-2) or modified-live feline ‘core’ vaccine (against FPV, FCV and FHV), when administered at 16 weeks or older, will provide long lasting (many years to a lifetime) immunity in a very high percentage of animals.”
What Should Your Dog’s Distemper Vaccine Schedule Look Like?

One. Uno. That’s it. Some dogs may require a second distemper vaccine as puppies if maternal antibodies block the first one, but if a puppy is vaccinated after 12 to 16 weeks of age, he will most likely be protected, for life, with just one distemper vaccine
 

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I actually titer for rabies as well. The rabies vaccination has always taken my dog down for days and now with the Addisions, I don't even take the chance. He hasn't had any vaccinations in over 7 years thanks to titers.
 

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Probiotics

Dave, I have a question about probiotics. Henry had stomach/diarrhea issues for many many days. Things are mostly better now thanks to many chicken/rice meals and antibiotics, but my vet suggested the probiotics - as a regular dose or only for a period of time?
 

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Dr. Schultz summarizes his 40 years of research with the following:

"Only one dose of the modified-live canine 'core' vaccine (against CDV, CAV-2 and CPV-2) or modified-live feline 'core' vaccine (against FPV, FCV and FHV), when administered at 16 weeks or older, will provide long lasting (many years to a lifetime) immunity in a very high percentage of animals."
What Should Your Dog's Distemper Vaccine Schedule Look Like?

One. Uno. That's it. Some dogs may require a second distemper vaccine as puppies if maternal antibodies block the first one, but if a puppy is vaccinated after 12 to 16 weeks of age, he will most likely be protected, for life, with just one distemper vaccine
If I understand what you're saying, Bella had all of her vaccinations the first four years of her life so she would be immune to the diseases?

This is still confusing to me since the arguments rage on both sides. I've noticed significant improvement in scratching and skin irritation in Bella since she hasn't had her shots (except rabies) for two years. I groom her at home and the only contact she has with another dog is our neighbor's--and they get any shot they can for their dog. :) I'd love to never give her another shot again.

I have been checking on vets in my area doing titer levels and the one who does charges $250 per titer test. That's way out of our retirement income. Vets in northern Texas/Dallas area are expensive.
 

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Dave T
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hi Nancy I hear ya. If you want to titer you could use Hemopet. it's cheaper. http://www.canine-epilepsy-guardian-angels.com/DrDoddsInstructions.htm
I've looked into that and have even contacted the company recently, asking if they had vets in my area who use it. I haven't heard back from them yet.

I think it was Dr. Dodds who said the vaccinations could be given in half-doses. I don't think the vets we know here would accommodate that idea either.

Some days I think it was easier being ignorant. :)
 
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