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Sophie
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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
Oh man that is what happened to Sophie as a secondary issue, SIBO. Poor little Nino although Sophie was super sick I'm surprised Nino has been a happy feller through it all. Thank goodness you have a diagnosis and he's on his way to a clean bum! Thanks for the update!
Though I feel awful that it was something my choice in bait potentially brought on, I'm very glad it isn't a chronic case or secondary issue to something like in your situation. After seeing him endure a rectal swab without even squirming, I don't think there is much that could dampen his spirits.

I just took a quick glance at your posts from when Sophie was having all of her issues and saw mention of metronidazole. Did she ever go on it?
 

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Yes she was on it for weeks. We have now changed her to Tylosin as it's not good to be on Metronidazole for too long (can cause neurological issues).
Sophie had tummy problems since she was about 5 months old but never acted sick I too was blaming it on the string cheese bait in the beginning and who knows maybe it did trigger underlying issues that were smoldering in her. I wish we could go back and start again I'd put her in bubble wrap from day one instead of starting now! :D
 

Sophie
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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Yes she was on it for weeks. We have now changed her to Tylosin as it's not good to be on Metronidazole for too long (can cause neurological issues).
Sophie had tummy problems since she was about 5 months old but never acted sick I too was blaming it on the string cheese bait in the beginning and who knows maybe it did trigger underlying issues that were smoldering in her. I wish we could go back and start again I'd put her in bubble wrap from day one instead of starting now! :D
Here's hoping that this was just a quick bout then, and not the beginning of something worse like it was for Sophie. Up until now, he has had a gut of steel, but I will be milking the easy diet and simple treats (but getting away from the Rx food asap) for quite awhile now. Bubble wrap at the ready!

Mario has been with us for 9 years and hasn't had a single health issue, aside from a Grade 1 or 2 rear patella. Just 5 months with Nino...we did say from the beginning that we would have to get health insurance based on how mischievous he is :laugh: Both the vet and our breeder thought it was likely that the cheese was behind it, and I'm clinging to that theory and hoping...
 
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I'm sure it's a one time thing for Nino! Sophie had issues continually. Didn't get real sick until May with the food change and I'm sure that was just a last straw kind of thing.

You have been SO lucky with Mario! I have never had a healthy dog in my (adult) life! I truly can't even imagine what that would be like.

I am so grateful for having gotten health insurance for Sophie. I was so sure I'd never need it boy was I wrong.
 

Sophie
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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
I'm sure it's a one time thing for Nino! Sophie had issues continually. Didn't get real sick until May with the food change and I'm sure that was just a last straw kind of thing.

You have been SO lucky with Mario! I have never had a healthy dog in my (adult) life! I truly can't even imagine what that would be like.

I am so grateful for having gotten health insurance for Sophie. I was so sure I'd never need it boy was I wrong.
We definitely got lucky with him. He was initially meant to be my juniors dog, but he has just about every conformation flaw possible. Looking back, it matters so little. He has been to the vet 3 or 4 times for matters outside of a checkup, all minor.

You can never be too sure, which is why I say go for it with the insurance. It's a small price to pay for something that can save so much.
 

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I am so glad you got to the bottom of Nino's sickness! Wishing him a speedy recovery! No more string cheese for the dogs in this house, geez :surprise:
 

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Whew, I' am so glad that the vet found something. There isn't anything more exasperating than KNOWING there's something wrong with your pup and not being able to find out what it is. Or being told that the vets can't find anything. It's much better to know and be able to treat. Nino's getting better and that's all that matters.
 

Sophie
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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
After a couple days of solid, brown stools, we are going to slowly start to switch back to a normal diet for our guy. Just looking at the ingredients of the Rx food makes my heart rate increase. He did get one soft treat broken up as bait yesterday at his run through, and he thought it was the bees knees. Canned food loses its novelty pretty quickly.
 

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I'm sorry that your pup is going through this. You definitely need to take him to a Vet if it's a sudden occurrence with no change of food. One thing for sure, Stop giving him Pumpkin. Pumpkin's are good if they are constipated. Since he has diarrhea, it will make him go constantly. Try cooking him some ground beef or ground chicken with tiny bits of chopped onions (just a little) and white rice. The ground beef and white rice will help stop runny stool. The onions are natural bacteria fighters. Try this for two or three days and see if it helps. But definitely take your pup to a Vet. It could be underlying virus or bacteria. And keep an eye out for any stool with blood that's a red flag.
I hope Nino gets better.
 

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I'm sorry that your pup is going through this. You definitely need to take him to a Vet if it's a sudden occurrence with no change of food. One thing for sure, Stop giving him Pumpkin. Pumpkin's are good if they are constipated. Since he has diarrhea, it will make him go constantly. Try cooking him some ground beef or ground chicken with tiny bits of chopped onions (just a little) and white rice. The ground beef and white rice will help stop runny stool. The onions are natural bacteria fighters. Try this for two or three days and see if it helps. But definitely take your pup to a Vet. It could be underlying virus or bacteria. And keep an eye out for any stool with blood that's a red flag.
I hope Nino gets better.
This post was from 2016. ;)

Feeding onions to dogs is very bad advice. They are toxic to dogs. And pumpkin can definitely help with loose stools. (Also, Kar Mar works for a vet though Im not sure she did when this post was written ;))
 

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This post was from 2016. ;)

Feeding onions to dogs is very bad advice. They are toxic to dogs. And pumpkin can definitely help with loose stools. (Also, Kar Mar works for a vet though Im not sure she did when this post was written ;))
I didn't know that onions was bad and toxic to dogs. Myles had some of my pasta a while back with a little bit of onions in the sauce and he seemed to like it and is fine. Of course, I don't feed onions in his food every day. It's only once in a blue moon. Someone told me that it was ok for them to have a little bit. I know dogs in India and around the world eat human foods which has onions in them and didn't seem to get sick. I'll keep that in mind. Thanks for that. On another note, I read that garlic was also toxic to dogs, yet there are vitamins with garlic, B vitamins and brewers yeast to help repel against fleas and ticks. Sometimes, I really wonder if all these articles we read are even true.
However, Pumpkins on the other hand does not agree with my dog. Every time he's given a pumpkin treat or foods with pumpkin in it, he tends to get diarrhea and loose stool. I don't know if this is true with fresh cooked pumpkin though, I never tried it. I guess all dogs are different just like humans. What works for one dog might not be good for the other.
 

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I didn't know that onions was bad and toxic to dogs. Myles had some of my pasta a while back with a little bit of onions in the sauce and he seemed to like it and is fine. Of course, I don't feed onions in his food every day. It's only once in a blue moon. Someone told me that it was ok for them to have a little bit. I know dogs in India and around the world eat human foods which has onions in them and didn't seem to get sick. I'll keep that in mind. Thanks for that. On another note, I read that garlic was also toxic to dogs, yet there are vitamins with garlic, B vitamins and brewers yeast to help repel against fleas and ticks. Sometimes, I really wonder if all these articles we read are even true.
However, Pumpkins on the other hand does not agree with my dog. Every time he's given a pumpkin treat or foods with pumpkin in it, he tends to get diarrhea and loose stool. I don't know if this is true with fresh cooked pumpkin though, I never tried it. I guess all dogs are different just like humans. What works for one dog might not be good for the other.
It is definitely true that one dog might have an adverse reaction to any particular food, like pumpkin. But it is a well known, and often used remedy for loose stools.

And while you may have gotten away with feeding you dog small smounts of onion or garlic, they ARE toxic, and it is not a good idea.
 

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It is definitely true that one dog might have an adverse reaction to any particular food, like pumpkin. But it is a well known, and often used remedy for loose stools.

And while you may have gotten away with feeding you dog small smounts of onion or garlic, they ARE toxic, and it is not a good idea.
No scientific evidence, but I have a feeling onions are like grapes and chocolate - they're toxic and SOME dogs may not react to them, but you never know if your dog will or won't until they eat the and it's too late, so better to avoid the completely.

I think it may also be volume and bigger dogs can get away with more than our little dogs. We never knew about the whole grapes being toxic thing when we had medium size dogs and we used to feed them grapes all the time (my last dog loved frozen grapes) with no reaction (and in terms of chocolate I've known dogs that ate a lot with no problem), but now that I know I wouldn't risk whether it would happen or not.
 

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No scientific evidence, but I have a feeling onions are like grapes and chocolate - they're toxic and SOME dogs may not react to them, but you never know if your dog will or won't until they eat the and it's too late, so better to avoid the completely.

I think it may also be volume and bigger dogs can get away with more than our little dogs. We never knew about the whole grapes being toxic thing when we had medium size dogs and we used to feed them grapes all the time (my last dog loved frozen grapes) with no reaction (and in terms of chocolate I've known dogs that ate a lot with no problem), but now that I know I wouldn't risk whether it would happen or not.
It鈥檚 not exactly the same, because with both chocolate and onions, they know exactly what the chemical compound is that is dangerous, and what it does inside the dog鈥檚 body. Now, some dogs may have a higher tolerance to the toxin than others, some onions may be more potent than others, and eating milk chocolate is not anywhere near as dangerous as eating baker鈥檚 chocolate. So it all 鈥渄epends鈥. with chocolate, if they know the size of tge dog, and the amount and kind of chocolate ingested, they can actually tell you whether your dog is in danger or not. (Not sure how it works with onions)

But grapes are COMPLETELY different, because they don鈥檛 even know, for sure, what causes the severe reactions some dogs have to them. Nor does it have anything to do with the size of the dog or the amount ingested. When Kodi had his 鈥済rape encounter鈥 The ER vets told me that the frustrating part is that a Chihuahua can eat a pound of grapes and get away with nothing more than a belly ache, while a Great Dane can go into renal failure after eating 3 or 4. And when a dog comes in, they have no way of knowing which way the dog will go. So they tend to treat every one as an emergency, because if they don鈥檛, by the time they KNOW, it鈥檚 too late to reverse the damage.
 

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It鈥檚 not exactly the same, because with both chocolate and onions, they know exactly what the chemical compound is that is dangerous, and what it does inside the dog鈥檚 body. Now, some dogs may have a higher tolerance to the toxin than others, some onions may be more potent than others, and eating milk chocolate is not anywhere near as dangerous as eating baker鈥檚 chocolate. So it all 鈥渄epends鈥. with chocolate, if they know the size of tge dog, and the amount and kind of chocolate ingested, they can actually tell you whether your dog is in danger or not. (Not sure how it works with onions)

But grapes are COMPLETELY different, because they don鈥檛 even know, for sure, what causes the severe reactions some dogs have to them. Nor does it have anything to do with the size of the dog or the amount ingested. When Kodi had his 鈥済rape encounter鈥 The ER vets told me that the frustrating part is that a Chihuahua can eat a pound of grapes and get away with nothing more than a belly ache, while a Great Dane can go into renal failure after eating 3 or 4. And when a dog comes in, they have no way of knowing which way the dog will go. So they tend to treat every one as an emergency, because if they don鈥檛, by the time they KNOW, it鈥檚 too late to reverse the damage.
Thanks for the clarification - that's how I've always interpreted the issue with grapes (one dog can eat a ton and be completely fine another can have a couple and be in major trouble - with no way to know which is which ahead of time), but didn't realize (or do enough research!) to know that it was completely different with onions/ chocolate :)
 

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It鈥檚 not exactly the same, because with both chocolate and onions, they know exactly what the chemical compound is that is dangerous, and what it does inside the dog鈥檚 body. Now, some dogs may have a higher tolerance to the toxin than others, some onions may be more potent than others, and eating milk chocolate is not anywhere near as dangerous as eating baker鈥檚 chocolate. So it all 鈥渄epends鈥. with chocolate, if they know the size of tge dog, and the amount and kind of chocolate ingested, they can actually tell you whether your dog is in danger or not. (Not sure how it works with onions)

But grapes are COMPLETELY different, because they don鈥檛 even know, for sure, what causes the severe reactions some dogs have to them. Nor does it have anything to do with the size of the dog or the amount ingested. When Kodi had his 鈥済rape encounter鈥 The ER vets told me that the frustrating part is that a Chihuahua can eat a pound of grapes and get away with nothing more than a belly ache, while a Great Dane can go into renal failure after eating 3 or 4. And when a dog comes in, they have no way of knowing which way the dog will go. So they tend to treat every one as an emergency, because if they don鈥檛, by the time they KNOW, it鈥檚 too late to reverse the damage.
Hopefully people realize that raisins are dried grapes! Someone I know with a Coton got hold of one of those small packs of raisins. Not good.
 

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Hopefully people realize that raisins are dried grapes! Someone I know with a Coton got hold of one of those small packs of raisins. Not good.
Yes! And in Great Britain, they are called sultanas! We had a British member talking about sultanas, and I had to look it up! I had to look it up. I didn鈥檛 have. CLUE what she was talking about!
 
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Yes! And in Great Britain, they are called sultanas! We had a British member talking about sultanas, and I had to look it up! I had to look it up. I didn鈥檛 have. CLUE what she was talking about!
Hi Karen, not quite鈥e have both raisins and sultanas In the UK. Raisins are dried black grapes and sultanas are dried green/yellow grapes.
 
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