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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well it’s official, my baby won’t be having any of her own! To be clear, we never would have bred her, but now it’s physically impossible.

We picked up a VERY stoned and VERY unhappy little girl from the vet this evening. It’s so funny how different they are… Charlie has always been so stoical about physical pain (though lots of drama for his emotional woes) Jo seems to be the opposite. They have her extra pain meds because she screamed when the tech took her out of the crate, and screamed again when I carried her into the house even though I was so careful. It’s so hard seeing them hurting and confused— I just wish we could explain!

But hopefully we’re through the worst of it and our biggest worry will be how on earth we keep our wild woman quiet for two weeks! Here’s my stony little girl in her onesie 😊


Dog Dog breed Carnivore Companion dog Snout
 

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Metrowest, MA
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Poor baby! I know she’ll feel better soon, but it isn’t easy to go through for either of you! 💕
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you for all the well wishes. She is definitely feeling a little better this morning, not so disoriented, but poor girl definitely seems pretty miserable. She is eating and drinking a little, so that’s good, but it’s so weird how tiny she seems. As anyone who has met her can attest, she has SO much personality packed into that tiny body that she doesn’t seem tiny. But she seems soooo small and delicate right now. Of course we colloquially think about it not as ‘spay’ which seems so simple, but technically, it’s an ovariohysterectomy. That’s a big deal! And I do think probably harder on littler dogs in some ways— just less room for the surgeon to do their thing.

Charlie is being the sweetest big brother and is clearly very worried about her. He’s not one for cuddling with her usually and really likes his personal space, but snuggled right up next to her in bed this morning 🥹

Dog Carnivore Dog breed Comfort Shelf
 

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Marion
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Probably better for her in the long run to feel sluggish. Finn acted completely normal after her spay, and although we tried so hard to keep her calm and inactive, she managed to tear her inside stitches and had to go back to the vet to get them re-done. After that she was on trazadone for several days to keep her calm, which she clearly hated. Every time it started to wear off, we could tell because she started acting like her happy, energetic self, and we would have to dose her again. Good luck, and I hope Jolene feels like her old self again soon!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Probably better for her in the long run to feel sluggish. Finn acted completely normal after her spay, and although we tried so hard to keep her calm and inactive, she managed to tear her inside stitches and had to go back to the vet to get them re-done. After that she was on trazadone for several days to keep her calm, which she clearly hated. Every time it started to wear off, we could tell because she started acting like her happy, energetic self, and we would have to dose her again. Good luck, and I hope Jolene feels like her old self again soon!
Yeah we have trazodone for when she starts feeling better! They said usually after a couple of days they start feeling more themselves and then you need it to avoid what happened to Finn with the stitches.
 

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You are right that it's a big deal, which people often forget, because it is a surgery done so routinely on pet dogs!

It is still major abdominal surgery! Pixel had a VERY hard time with it. Panda was easier, but first, Panda is more stoic, where Pixel is a "Princess and the Pea" type. Second, Panda was a fully adult, 6 year old dog at the time of her spay, had had a litter of pups and a C-section. So she had been through "some stuff" already. Also, she was WAY past the stage of "puppy wildness", so we didn't have to worry about that as she started feeling better!
 

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You are right that it's a big deal, which people often forget, because it is a surgery done so routinely on pet dogs!

It is still major abdominal surgery! Pixel had a VERY hard time with it. Panda was easier, but first, Panda is more stoic, where Pixel is a "Princess and the Pea" type. Second, Panda was a fully adult, 6 year old dog at the time of her spay, had had a litter of pups and a C-section. So she had been through "some stuff" already. Also, she was WAY past the stage of "puppy wildness", so we didn't have to worry about that as she started feeling better!
How old is she? Our Lexi is approaching six months and we’re trying to decide whether to spay at six months or wait until after the first heat. Everyone seems to have a different opinion on that. Glad your baby is feeling better.
 

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How old is she? Our Lexi is approaching six months and we’re trying to decide whether to spay at six months or wait until after the first heat. Everyone seems to have a different opinion on that. Glad your baby is feeling better.
PLEASE do not spay her at 6 months. It is pretty clear at this point that it is better for dogs to allow them to be fully mature and have the benefit of their adult hormones before desexing. For a very good, balanced look at the pros and cons of spay/neuter, here is a link to an inexpensive booklet put out by the Puppy Culture people. It even includes links to all the reasearch papers they used to write the booklet if you want to do the “deep dive” for more information:PUPPY CULTURE SPAY/NEUTER BOOKLET
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
How old is she? Our Lexi is approaching six months and we’re trying to decide whether to spay at six months or wait until after the first heat. Everyone seems to have a different opinion on that. Glad your baby is feeling better.
Agree with krandall on waiting!! Jo is 16 months old. We decided to wait until after her first heat or a year, whichever came later, based on the research about the importance of getting those hormones for their development. Her first heat came a week after her first birthday. They say to wait a couple months after the heat has ended, and this timing worked for us (but we still felt pretty confident that it would be be well before her second heat)

I’m not going to lie, it was not the easiest to deal with— she went into heat right before she was supposed to travel cross country with me, so she couldn’t come at the last minute. She also couldn’t go on her group walks for a few weeks to be safe. And she was a bit of a drama queen about the whole thing 😊 But, they say every dog is different and for some, heat is really no big deal. Regardless ,dealing with a few weeks of annoyance is totally worth it to us if it means she is overall healthier, so I’d do it again.

I’ll also add (something I hadn’t thought about) is that I’m so thankful that she’s 100% potty trained. I feel like at 6 months she was still very much learning, and we probably would have seen some regression. She’s been great about it, despite clearly having some pain and being heavily medicated— she goes quickly on command which makes this much easier.
 

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Agree with krandall on waiting!! Jo is 16 months old. We decided to wait until after her first heat or a year, whichever came later, based on the research about the importance of getting those hormones for their development. Her first heat came a week after her first birthday. They say to wait a couple months after the heat has ended, and this timing worked for us (but we still felt pretty confident that it would be be well before her second heat)

I’m not going to lie, it was not the easiest to deal with— she went into heat right before she was supposed to travel cross country with me, so she couldn’t come at the last minute. She also couldn’t go on her group walks for a few weeks to be safe. And she was a bit of a drama queen about the whole thing 😊 But, they say every dog is different and for some, heat is really no big deal. Regardless ,dealing with a few weeks of annoyance is totally worth it to us if it means she is overall healthier, so I’d do it again.

I’ll also add (something I hadn’t thought about) is that I’m so thankful that she’s 100% potty trained. I feel like at 6 months she was still very much learning, and we probably would have seen some regression. She’s been great about it, despite clearly having some pain and being heavily medicated— she goes quickly on command which makes this much easier.
Wow you make some really good points, thank you. Thank you both for your input all very good to know!
 

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I'm glad Jolene is resting and is getting comforted by Charlie. My biggest challenge with Jasper was trying to slow him down. The vet tech told me he was even wagging his tail in recovery. The procedure for females is more complicated and she's so tiny. It hardly seems fair. I hope the rest of her recovery goes smoothly and you get some rest.
 

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I'm glad Jolene is resting and is getting comforted by Charlie. My biggest challenge with Jasper was trying to slow him down. The vet tech told me he was even wagging his tail in recovery. The procedure for females is more complicated and she's so tiny. It hardly seems fair. I hope the rest of her recovery goes smoothly and you get some rest.
Not for a spay/ neuter but in general to keep them calm after surgery, I found the combo of gabapentin and trazadone to work wonders for Perry - when he had his surgeries and was on crate rest for soooooo long, it's the only thing that kept him chilled out AND kept me sane!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Not for a spay/ neuter but in general to keep them calm after surgery, I found the combo of gabapentin and trazadone to work wonders for Perry - when he had his surgeries and was on crate rest for soooooo long, it's the only thing that kept him chilled out AND kept me sane!
That is the combo we started her on yesterday, when she woke up ready to take on the world! We just gave her another dose of just trazodone, as her morning dose had worn off and she was trying to play with Charlie again, and it knocked her out pretty well. I hate to have her so doped up but the vet said the #1 most important thing is that she heals well, and there’s no way that’s going to happen without the help of drugs. Thankfully she is being SUCH a good girl with the meds, I was worried about it given how tiny her mouth is and how opinionated she is, but she’s been great.

Also, a tip for anyone whose dog is getting surgery— for Charlie’s spring surgery, and for this one, I asked them to shave as little as possible bc their skin gets irritated. Previously, whenever Charlie had an IV, they shaved a huge band on his wrist, which I always just assumed was necessary. And it took MONTHS to grow out. But then @krandall showed us the tiny little spot they shaved for Panda’s emergency c-section, so I learned it was possible to do with very little shaving! And the request worked… it looks so much better, and there’s also one less thing for them to worry.
 
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