Havanese Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

· Metrowest, MA
Joined
·
32,695 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a bit of a slog to read, but well worth it if you are interested. It is the first real look at the health consequences of these procedures (or lack thereof) side by side, over time. It doesn’t have all the answers… the number of dogs with OSS was too low to draw full conclusions in some areas. But it is extremely interesting.

 

· Metrowest, MA
Joined
·
32,695 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for sharing this article. I will need to make a decision for Issac and Pepper. His breeder suggests vasectomy over neuter so I have been looking into it.
It won’t be right for everyone, or for every dog. Because there ARE behaviors that neutering helps with. Just not nearly as many as once thought, and most are trainable in most dogs.

The one I am more leery of is the ovary sparing spay. You have to be SOOO careful of a girl who has had this procedure. She STILL comes into heat, and although it is less messy and she can’t get pregnant, she is still attractive to male dogs, and it is REALLY important that a male dog not be allowed to tie with her, or it can do her serious physical harm. So you STILL need to carefully protect her from other dogs during her heat, both intact and neutered. And while regular pyo is no longer possible, stump pyo is still a possibility, and equally life-threatening. This is less likely if the surgery is done by someone very familiar with the surgery, who is really good at it, however. You are also restricted from performance sports and day care while your OOS girl is in heat, just as if she were intact. So you miss 6 weeks of each year of competition time. (Seems unfair to me that the girls are singled out like this, but it is what it is!)

My vet did an OOS on her girl, and now wishes she hadn’t. It’s also hard to go back and find the tiny ovaries that are no longer attached to the uterus, if you decide to complete the spay later.

For me, I will continue to put off both spay and neuter of my dogs until there is a REASON to do it. In Panda’s case, it was her insane protectiveness of Ducky… still mothering him when he was a year old. LOL! And I knew she was not going to be bred again. But I have looked into the risks of pyo in our breed, and they do not increase until after the age of 10. So there is really no reason to rush spay there. I have my hands all over my dogs daily. If she were to develop a mammary tumor, I would find it when it was very small, and hopefully operable. And being intact for longer is protective against so many other cancers!

Likewise, with the boys, I will put off neutering them as long as they are not bothering me too much! LOL!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Pucks104
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top