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Oreo's Mom
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Everyone, I was just wondering how I can get little Oreo used to his leash. He walks in the house, from the living room to the kitchen ( where we usually take him for meals ;) ) just fine, but when we try outdoors he will not budge in anyway. I don't wish to force him, I want it to come naturally from him. Any suggestions?
 

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Samson & Delilah's Mom
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Lots and Lots of treats, toys and praise. Keep it fun and exciting. Keep your voice happy and encouraging. Jump around, anything to get his attention on you and not the leash. Use a light weight leash. Soon he will jump for joy when he sees the leash. Hope this helps.

Debbie & Sam
 

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Oreo's Mom
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Discussion Starter #3
Okay, will do :) My daugher, 2 yrs, and I went out to our mailbox and took Oreo. He was fascinated by all the fluffy white stuff ;) He doesn't like the side walk, it just might be because we have carpeted floors. He will have to get over this somehow... Lynn, may I ask what your hubby did to help your little guy?
 

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The biggest problem I see with people trying to train any dog to a leash is that they train them to pull instead. Don't match the force on the leash when the dog pulls. Take him back with a bit more pressure. It's not a JERK but an explanation. NEVER let him pull. A short leash works best to start with. Start when they are ready to be active and not when they are lazy. Go with a bit more speed to start with.

The easiest way is to go for long walks. It's about a mile from our house out to the main road. We baby sat for an adult dog once who the owners could not get to respect the leash. Pam took him on a walk up to the highway and by the time they got back the Havanese knew how to lead. Of course that would be too long for a puppy but the idea is the same. On a long walk they find out that the easy way is the correct way. The walk needs to be long enough that they start to find that out.

Watch Cesar on Friday nights on the National Geographic channel. That's the way you do it. Like he does. It doesn't take long but like any animal training the timing is what's most important.
 

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With Kodi we made a game of it. We were in PA for the weekend and just started walking him around the grounds of the hotel, one holding the leash and one calling to him. With Shelby, it was easy. She just runs after Kodi.
PS - Shelby found her bark and is using it on anyone who walks past the house.
 

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Oreo's Mom
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Discussion Starter #6
I sent out a PM last night for more info on Tom's suggestion, and I have posted it here as I am sure we all find Tom's suggestions very helpful - our very own Dog Whisperer:

I thank you for your reply. Please bear with me, when I ask if you could clarify "How" someone would actually train a dog to pull on a lead? I really would like to know, so that I don't do that. So, for instance I am now on the sidewalk, in front of our condo, Oreo is sitting and won' budge, could you please tell me what you would do in this instance? I do watch the dog whisperer and I do agree with Cesar's way of doing things. It just feels like I am dragging him along. I don't want to be soft, so that Oreo thinks he can start pulling me where HE wants to go, but how can I do it in a calm assertive manner? Oreo has alot of energy that NEEDS to be dicipated with long walks. I want to get started, so any pointers in the right direction would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you again Tom for your time. :)

Tom Wrote:

This question would have been perfectly fine on the forum for everyone
to see.

I don't know without being there. Maybe it's the sidewalk. The best
time for leash training is when the pup is ready to go with lots of
energy. Maybe start in the house or in a hallway somewhere that he's used
to playing in. Outside on the sidewalk might be a little overwhelming
right now. And don't feel like you have to do it right now or tomorrow
at 2:30. He'll learn.

What I meant by teaching a dog to pull is by just letting him pull
without a correction. Never hold the leash for the dog to pull. Havanese
especially are very smart and can learn a bad habit really quickly.
He has to come back from pulling and relax, stop when you stop, and go
when you go.

It's hard for puppies as they don't have much of an attention span yet.
I don't even know at what age we teach leading on a leash. We don't
have such a schedule. Probably just when they are ready.

I teach foals to lead on day 2 simply because they can get too strong
later and right after they nurse they have a few minutes where they are
receptive to learning but pretty soon will just want to lay down to
sleep and getting them used to being handled starts as soon as they are
born. Puppies are different. Horses have to be ready to run soon after
they are born.

Good luck, Tom
 

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Amanda
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If you are just talking about a nice soft walk rather than an obedience type heel. I just try to be more interesting than what is around me. This can be accomplished with a praising voice, treats, a favorite toy. Obviously if the dog is pulling or sitting down, he isn't understanding what you are asking of him, so I think it is my job to communicate better.

Dora was the type of puppy that when she would get to the end of the lead rather than pull, she would sit down. So to teach her that she needs to walk with the lead, I would say "let's go" in my high pitch lets have fun voice. Maybe show her toy. When she would get up and walk... "yes, good girl." Now 2 years later, she is a bit more assertive when walking around the neighborhood and definetly doesn't sit down on her favorite walks! Just practice to get what you want. Obviously with a puppy, you are going to have to go shorter and keep your sessions longer.

In the puppy class they teach at my area, one of the things they start off with is just letting the puppy drag the loosh leash. Play this game in your backyard-obviously supervised. The dog will get use to the feel of the collar and leash. Then start with the actually walk with the toy or the treat.

She has never been one to pull fortunetly. I think early on I taught her attention to me and this has helped. She has also been pretty easy to teach to heel in obedience too.

Amanda
 

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Oreo's Mom
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Amanda and All for your helpful suggestions. Time and patience in this case is the key. I will keep you all posted :)
 

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I just wanted to add that you don't HAVE to do all your leash training outside. When our German Shepherd was a puppy, she had the same sort of issues as your dog--wouldn't budge on the leash. I felt so terrible trying to drag her down the rough sidewalk, so I decided to work on it indoors for awhile. We would walk from room to room together, and she soon learned to stay by my side, sit when I stopped, etc. Oh, and our house was only 1,200 sq ft, so it wasn't like we were going on a stroll through our mansion or anything :D ! I just wanted you to know that its an option!! Good luck! :)
 

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I found that Ollie hated a leash and a collar but immediately did fine when I put his harness on - he didn't like the feel around the neck of a collar on walks - are you using a harness?
 

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I was thinking about this and it might be like starting a horse under saddle. We don't put a saddle and bridle on for the first time AND get on to ride. We put the saddle on one day, maybe several, and let the horse get used to that before we ask another question. With horses it's really important to ask only one question at the time-first because they're not as quick learners as dogs are and also they are big enough to hurt you. We only get in the saddle after the horse doesn't get worked up over having it on. We have our own whole system of training horses but that's another story. Anyway..........

I'm thinking that maybe it would be a good idea to just clip the leash on in the house while you are watching the pup and let him get used to having it on and dragging it around. That way when you go outside he's not having to process too many new "questions" since he already knows what the leash is.
 

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Oreo's Mom
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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you for all your feedback. My son and I have taken the suggestion to walk him around the house. He seems to like "exploring" with us, as he has never been allowed anywhere but our living room and kitchen. He really LOVES to trot into the kitchen - you can see how bouncy he gets as he gets closer and closer. I just love his "springy" step - he is so cute :)

As for the too many questions, you are right Tom. I don't want to turn him off the leash, so baby steps it will be. A little bit at a time :) Thank you again.
 

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Hi
In the begiining I got a very very light , very thin leash . One that you would use on a toy poddle or a yorkshire terrier I would put it on him in the kitchen with his collar not his harness .He would then drag it around while he played . I was with him at all times . DO not leave them alone they can get caught .. He did not like it in the beginning and he would fight it . I did it every day and I would leave it on for a few minutes longer each day . Never that long only 4-5 minutes and then take it off - then eventually got used to it . Sometimes I would hold it up sometimes he would drag it . He learned the difference that it tugged less when I held it ..
I never left it on him for long periods . Then after a week I took him outside on the grass and do the same thing . I know it is hard for you as you live in snow country . and it is very cold on those sensitive little paws not to mention the salt . Be sure to wash his feet when you bring him indoors .
By the time he went to puppy class he accepted a heavier nylon leash . All the leashes I used were light nylon , . I got them at petco or petsmart .
Now I use a harness when I walk him .
It is funny but no one mentions using a harness when they walk their dogs. It is not a training harness - just a small dog harness but it does not stress the neck as much and it is easier to manage the dog .
Even thought the neck is strong and muscular in a large dog . You have to be careful with smaller dogs amd I think a harness is key .
 

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I never used a collar on Kodi. I always used a harness on my big dogs so I just thought it would be easier. They took to walking right away. I don't think they like having a collar around their necks. At least mine don't.

I have tried a collar because I wanted to keep their tags on them at all times, but they don't seem to like them. Kodi is microchipped, and Shelby will be when she is spayed. Do you all keep ID tags on your dogs all the time? Any suggestions?
 

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Bugsy's Mom
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I use colors and leashes with my standards, but with Bugsy I started out and am using harness and leash. We had no problem what so ever, as he took to it right away. I also take off the colors off my other two as soon as we get home from a walk, as I see no need to have them in the house and backyard that's completely fenced in. All my dogs are microchipes as well.
 

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A harness may be your ticket. I know our breeder has recommended a harness for novices. She worries about too much strain on their little necks. I guess you just need to find out what works for you.

I plan on starting with a harness too. My last dog, the terrorist (Cairn Terrier) was always able to slip out of her colar no matter how tight you made it. It used to scare me.:eek: But now after being on this forum and research, I think I was dealing with an alpha female. She definitely was a handful.....
 

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We have always used a collar - actually my guys have two collars. They are on the electric fence & that collar they wear all day from the time they get up till they go to bed. I do have tags on those collars as I offer a reward if they are lost. They also have collars that we put on when on leash & I also have tags on that. Both Lily& Lexi are microchipped and Logan will be when he is fixed. I feel, better safe than sorry!! I did want to try the puppia harness on Logan but my groomer said that harnesses cause bad mats. Has anyone had that problem?
 

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Samson & Delilah's Mom
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I used a harness on Sam until he was about 7 months old. The matting and tangling the harness caused was too much. We switched to a collar, it also causes tangles but in a smaller area so he only wears it when we are out for our walks. He doesn't wear anything in the house or backyard.
 

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We have always used a collar - actually my guys have two collars. They are on the electric fence & that collar they wear all day from the time they get up till they go to bed. I do have tags on those collars as I offer a reward if they are lost. They also have collars that we put on when on leash & I also have tags on that. Both Lily& Lexi are microchipped and Logan will be when he is fixed. I feel, better safe than sorry!! I did want to try the puppia harness on Logan but my groomer said that harnesses cause bad mats. Has anyone had that problem?
I found a rolled, soft cord harness hand made by Timerbline for approx $14.00 that I recommend to my puppy buyers. Doesn't mat the coat, and less strain on the neck. To get one you would need to contact the manufacture direct or go to their web site as the place I use to buy them from has gone out of business.
 

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Kathy - did you spell that correctly?? Is it Timbaline or timberland?? I tried to go online but could not find it. Thanks. Laurie
 
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