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Flynn of Sir Winston fame
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2,745 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I believe this should come with all new puppies...it is so true, regardless of breed...
DO I GO HOME TODAY?


My family brought me home cradled in their arms.

They cuddled me and smiled at me and said I was full of charm.

They played with me and laughed with me and showered me with toys.

I sure do love my family, especially the girls and boys.

The children loved to feed me, they gave me special treats.

They even let me sleep with them - all snuggled in the sheets.

I used to go for walks, often several times a day.

They even fought to hold the leash, I'm very proud to say.

These are the things I'll not forget - cherished memory,

because I now live in the shelter - without my family.

They used to laugh and praise me when I played with that old shoe.

But I didn't know the difference between the old ones and the new.

The kids and I would grab a rag, for hours we would tug.

So I thought I did the right thing when I chewed the bedroom rug.

They said that I was out of control, and would have to live outside.

This I did not understand, although I tried and tried.

The walks stopped, one by one; they said they hadn't time.

I wish that I could change things, I wish I knew my crime.

My life became so lonely, in the back yard, on a chain.

I barked and barked, all day long, just to keep from going insane.

So they brought me to the shelter, but were embarrassed to say why.

They said I caused an allergy, then they each kissed me goodbye.

If I'd only had some classes, when I was just a little pup,

then I would have been a better dog when I was all grown up.

"You only have one day left." I heard the worker say.

Does that mean I have a second chance?

DO I GO HOME TODAY?

I saw this attributed to Sandi Thompson and then I saw it with Author Unknown...not sure who wrote it, but please don't let this happen. If you get a puppy, be prepared to do the training, PATIENTLY..a puppy is like a child, it takes a while..they don't come with manners!
 

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Dave T
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10,876 Posts
Sad but oh so true. Thanks Flynn.
 

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Flynn of Sir Winston fame
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2,745 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sad but oh so true. Thanks Flynn.
Sometimes I think it might be better if we called a puppy 16 weeks, instead of 4 months. People tend to expect too much of newly acquired puppies. Most breeders won't let puppies go until they are 12 weeks old..somehow 4 months sounds much older than 16 weeks..and I think people expect too much. Training is just beginning then in my humble opinion..Sometimes it is better to try and get an older dog who is already trained..not a cute puppy.
 

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Dave T
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10,876 Posts
Sometimes I think it might be better if we called a puppy 16 weeks, instead of 4 months. People tend to expect too much of newly acquired puppies. Most breeders won't let puppies go until they are 12 weeks old..somehow 4 months sounds much older than 16 weeks..and I think people expect too much. Training is just beginning then in my humble opinion..Sometimes it is better to try and get an older dog who is already trained..not a cute puppy.
Flynn I think the biggest problem is people do not educate themselves before they get their first dog. They are not prepared for what awaits them and how little time they have to learn these things before problems arise. I differ with you on the "training is just beginning then". The training starts from day one. There is a lot to teach your puppy in a short time , that's why you need to do some homework beforehand.
 

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Dave T
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10,876 Posts
This is from Ian Dunbar's "Before You Get Your Puppy." a list of priorities

Once you have completed your doggy education and chosen the best possible puppy, you will find there is much to do and little time to do it. Here are your puppy priorities listed in order of urgency and ranked in terms of importance.

1. HOUSEHOLD ETIQUETTE - from the very first day your puppy comes home. Housetraining, chewtoy-training, and teaching your dog alternatives to recreational barking are by far the most pressing items on your puppy's educational agenda. URGENCY RATING 1 -- IMPORTANCE RATING 3

2. HOME ALONE - during the first few days and weeks your puppy is at home. Sadly, the maddening pace of present-day domestic dogdom necessitates teaching your puppy how to enjoy spending time at home alone — not only to ensure your pup adheres to established household etiquette when unsupervised, but more importantly to prevent your puppy from becoming anxious in your absence.--- URGENCY RATING 2 ---IMPORTANCE RATING 4

3. SOCIALIZATION WITH PEOPLE - especially before twelve weeks of age but forever thereafter.
URGENCY RATING 3 --- IMPORTANCE RATING 2

4. DOG-DOG SOCIALIZATION - between three months and eighteen weeks of age to establish reliable bite inhibition and forever after to maintain friendliness to other dogs. As soon as your puppy turns three months old, it is time to play catch up vis-a-vis dog-dog socialization, time for puppy classes, long walks...
URGENCY RATING 4 --- IMPORTANCE RATING 6

5. SIT AND SETTLE DOWN COMMANDS - begin anytime you would like your puppydog to listen to you. If you teach your dog just a couple of commands, they would have to be Sit and Settle Down.
URGENCY RATING 5 --- IMPORTANCE RATING 5

6. BITE INHIBITION - by eighteen weeks of age. A soft mouth is the single most important quality for any dog. Hopefully, your dog will never bite or fight, but if he does, well-established bite inhibition ensures that your dog causes little if any damage.
URGENCY RATING 6 --- IMPORTANCE RATING 1 - Bite inhibition is of crucial importance and by far the single most important quality of any dog, or any animal. Living with a dog that does not have reliable bite inhibition is unpleasant and dangerous. Bite inhibition must be acquired during puppyhood. You must fully understand how to teach your puppy bite inhibition. Attempting to teach bite inhibition to an adolescent or adult dog is often extremely difficult, dangerous, and time-consuming.
 

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Gibbs & Probie
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122 Posts
I have talked more people out of getting a dog, than I have in getting a dog. It is a commitment, and some just see that cute cuddly fur ball and go blind to all the other issues of raising a dog.
I just had a major issue with my nephew getting a dog. #1- I am not a fan of the "side walk" adoptions:( I think their line of thinking is to just get the dog in a home, but if it is not the right home, then it is just wrong! Any how, he came home with an Australian Shepherd! They live in a subdivision - he is lazy - they tried to make it a house dog - and right now I am not sure if they still have the dog.
Okay, enough of airing my family laundry:)
 

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Flynn of Sir Winston fame
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2,745 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks Dave for posting all of those sites...Yes, if the puppy has been trained from day one...but the new owner training is what bothers me too, they are unprepared...you are right!! No matter how well trained the puppy is, when he goes to a new home, the training will have to be continued in the same manner as it was from day one.
Thank you for all who will continue this tread with advice for the frustrated new owner.
I do have to say one breeder I worked with did send me information well in advance about what was to be done and expected with the puppy she was selling me. I am sure some do, but some just put them on a plane and send them along...
This site is a wealth of information for people before they get a dog. I have asked someone at HRI to recommend this site before adoptions are made. I know Fosters are great about keeping up with their adoptees...that is great...
If you can't find answers on HF...you will find someone who can tell you where to go get the answers...
 
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