Havanese Forum banner
41 - 58 of 58 Posts

· Metrowest, MA
Joined
·
32,720 Posts
I have tried those veggident (vet highly recommended) and she is able to eat them in less than a minute. I dont see how it can possibly scrape any tartar off in that timeframe so it seems like empty calories. She does love them though.
Just be aware that we had a HUGE vet bill when Kodi was younger from a bowel obstruction caused by a dental chew. It turns out that if a dog does not chew them thoroughly, and bites off and swallows a big piece, it can become lodged in the intestines, causing an obstruction. We were told by the University hospital ER that the #1 cause they see for surgical obstructions is dental chews…
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
5,259 Posts
I have tried those veggident (vet highly recommended) and she is able to eat them in less than a minute. I dont see how it can possibly scrape any tartar off in that timeframe so it seems like empty calories. She does love them though.
Your right...I don't think they do anything to scrape any tartar off. We stopped all treats, but occasionally give them a half of one. The only treats they get now are those little red, yellow and orange peppers. :)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Yes, another reason I am leery of them. I think the V.e.t. ones are supposed to break down in the gut though.
My last dog died when she picked up a turkey bone that fell out of the garbage truck after thanksgiving during my states second lockdown. The bill was over 10,000 and I didnt even get to say goodbye…

Every time my new dog picks up a stick or twig or whatever my heart goes in my throat lol. But dogs will be dogs. You just have to watch them careful.
 

· Metrowest, MA
Joined
·
32,720 Posts
Yes, another reason I am leery of them. I think the V.e.t. ones are supposed to break down in the gut though.
My last dog died when she picked up a turkey bone that fell out of the garbage truck after thanksgiving during my states second lockdown. The bill was over 10,000 and I didnt even get to say goodbye…

Every time my new dog picks up a stick or twig or whatever my heart goes in my throat lol. But dogs will be dogs. You just have to watch them careful.
The manufacturers DAy that they break down… the vets in the Emergency hospital say theat NONE of them should be trusted. It totally depends on the size of the piece broken off and the particular dog’s gut flora and intestinal size. One experience was too costly for us and painful for him. We don’t take any chances anymore, considering that they don’t really help teeth, and there are a LOT better treat foods available.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Havanese Dreams

· Registered
Joined
·
3,616 Posts
I definitely think whether some chews are dangerous or can cause dental problems is really individualized. Sundance has never shown interest in harder chews like antlers or Himalayan chews. I’ve tried many “bagged” non compressed chews of different recipes and brands and they are really more like firm treats but still too soft and easy to eat fast. Bully sticks are just right for him, like Goldilocks, because they are hard enough that he can’t break off pieces but soft enough that he enjoys chewing them. It’s impossible to buy good ones locally in my area. The mainstream manufacturers add some kind of artificial flavors or powder, and some kind of ingredient to help with the drying process, and I think that is what causes some of the staining others have mentioned, and they smell. There are mainstream manufacturers that make odor free bully sticks but I’m pretty sure they add flavor to them. In order to get natural bully sticks without additional ingredients, I have to order them online in a larger quantity and it’s expensive. I buy a brand that is odor free because they’re dried longer, but that means the flavor isn’t as strong. There are usually a couple in every bag that Sundance rejects, and once we reach the end of the bag they aren’t as appealing. They still aren’t completely “odor free” but they don’t smell gamey or obtrusive. Sometimes Sundance will accept one of the rejects if I soak the end in a glass of water for a few minutes. The second best chews for Sundance have been tracheas. They are probably a little too soft and more like a long lasting treat. A 6” bully stick lasts much longer, I almost always replace them before he’s finished. Tracheas kind of gross me out though so I don’t buy them often. When I do, Sundance carries them around gently like they’re special toys. He chews them very carefully compared to bully sticks, and he wants us to play with him with the trachea.

Something I’ve considered is that with multiple dogs bully sticks might not be a good option, even if they’re okay for one of them. They are too soft for a lot of dogs that chew harder than Sundance. Maybe we’ll get lucky and they’ll end up being a good option for our second Havanese. If not I think Sundance will just get bully sticks on special occasions, since I haven’t found something else. He isn’t such a heavy chewer that he chews other things.

I actually can’t find a veterinary dentist in my area. There was one who rotated into different animal hospitals all over the state but he’s gone. I think one of the chains might have found someone else but I think I’d then need to see their regular vet to get a referral. A lot of the clinics list dental as a service but when I actually called the vet does it. i haven’t decided if I’ll go back to our vet for his next cleaning but I’m hoping I’ll find someone that specializes so that he can have X-rays, etc.
 

· Metrowest, MA
Joined
·
32,720 Posts
LOL! That is amazing. Before we realized that Kodi was allergic to beef, he was able to chew up and EAT a bully stick in less than 10 minutes! …Then again, he ALDO thought that the best way to access whatever you put inside the BLACK Kongs, (meant for heavy chewers, like pit bulls) was to simply chew the end off! LOL!

You are absolutely right, though, when it comes to chews, it is certainly NOT a “one size fits all!”!!! I think Ducky is more like Sundance! He is SO gentle with his toys… and then Kodi destroys them! LOL!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Discussion Starter · #48 ·
I just wanted to let you know that Kiki had her procedure last week, and she’s doing great. The dentist pulled a total of two teeth: the purple incisor and a puppy tooth that was being reabsorbed. She didn’t have any adult teeth lurking under the surface. She also had a cleaning and her teeth are so white now!

Since Kiki had so many adult teeth that never came in and she had a few baby teeth that never fell out and they are perfectly healthy, it’s my understanding that the dentist left them alone. This discretion in the moment was the reason why I went with a specialist, even though it was more expensive.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
5,259 Posts
What do you feel comfortable giving your dogs for “chewing time”? Ivy hasn’t had bully sticks either, but seems to tear things apart easily, so finding safe chew toys has been hard. And she loves to chew. ☺
When Scout and Truffles were young we gave them the bully sticks to chew. They loved them! When they had their teeth cleaned the dentist found cracks in the last two lower molars with an abscess. Truffles also had two front teeth with cracks with an abscess. She has tiny teeth! Scout has large teeth! Anyway...the dentist said it was most likely caused by chewing on bully sticks. She said large dogs can usually tolerate hard chews, bones etc... without causing damage, but not a good idea for small dogs. She mentioned never to offer a chew unless you can make an indentation with your fingernail.
 

· Owned by a Havallon
Joined
·
3,780 Posts
What do you feel comfortable giving your dogs for “chewing time”? Ivy hasn’t had bully sticks either, but seems to tear things apart easily, so finding safe chew toys has been hard. And she loves to chew. ☺
For chewing snacks, I give mine dehydrated things like heart, lung and tripe. I make sure the chews are soft enough so that they can bend and break easily. The lung and heart doesn’t last very long but the tripe is a challenge. It sort of turns rubbery and they really have to work at it. It took Mia 24 minutes to get through a piece I gave her the other day. However, she is a dainty chewer. It took my yorkie 12 minutes which is a long time for him I got these at Farm and Hounds. These are all very nutritional too. However, the tripe does smell because that is the nature of tripe. I feed raw homemade so they get some chewing time during their meals too.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
For chewing snacks, I give mine dehydrated things like heart, lung and tripe. I make sure the chews are soft enough so that they can bend and break easily. The lung and heart doesn’t last very long but the tripe is a challenge. It sort of turns rubbery and they really have to work at it. It took Mia 24 minutes to get through a piece I gave her the other day. However, she is a dainty chewer. It took my yorkie 12 minutes which is a long time for him I got these at Farm and Hounds. These are all very nutritional too. However, the tripe does smell because that is the nature of tripe. I feed raw homemade so they get some chewing time during their meals too.
Thank you so much for sharing these ideas with us!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
When Scout and Truffles were young we gave them the bully sticks to chew. They loved them! When they had their teeth cleaned the dentist found cracks in the last two lower molars with an abscess. Truffles also had two front teeth with cracks with an abscess. She has tiny teeth! Scout has large teeth! Anyway...the dentist said it was most likely caused by chewing on bully sticks. She said large dogs can usually tolerate hard chews, bones etc... without causing damage, but not a good idea for small dogs. She mentioned never to offer a chew unless you can make an indentation with your fingernail.
That is what I’ve read as well, so we have steered clear of the more solid feeling bones and chews in the pet stores and food stores. It is good to hear this message was confirmed by a canine dentist. Unfortunately, everything we have tried with her, that passes the fingernail pressure test, she rips apart pretty quickly, and then we have to take them away for safety. Knotted/twisted Cotton ropes seem to keep her busy as she loves playing tug and fetching them too… so they’ve become our go to for chewy activities.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Puppyhood is different. Puppies DO need things to chew on. Both for teething and developmentally… as well as to protect the owner’s home! LOL! But when we are talking about cleaning, (as opposed to daily brushing) we are talking about fully adult dogs.
I DO have a few moose antler slices and wood chews around the house, and once in a GREAT while one of the dogs, typically Ducky, who is the youngest, and still puppyish, will seek one out. I still would prefer that they have something appropriate to chew on than my base boards, thank you very much! But I don’t give them “consumable” chews, nor do I encourage chewing. They are just there as an alternative to “bad” chewing!
What wood chews do you use?
 

· Metrowest, MA
Joined
·
32,720 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
2,556 Posts
I know the argument against things that are too hard - but Perry was a super chewer (he's chilling a bit more as he gets older) so we have been using himalayan chews and split antlers (he's not a fan of the whole antlers). We also got the gorilla wood chew that Karen recommended - Perry's chewed on it but isn't the biggest fan.

For soft toys, while he still could tear them, the skineeez extreme and the GoDog chewguard work better - just get ones with less floppy parts and cut off all tags and floppy bits (things they can grab and pull). I've still had to mend them a thousand times, but they do still last a while.
 
41 - 58 of 58 Posts
Top